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40 Proposals

By someone else   Feb 19, 6:18am   270 links   45,058 views   288 comments   watch (3)   quote      

The common theme is ending the entrapment and exploitation of US citizens.

Copyright

Crime and Prisons

Discrimination

Education

Foreign Policy

  • End all visas for Saudis and freeze their US assets until they establish freedom to change religion and freedom of speech, stop murdering gays, and stop sponsoring terrorism.
  • Ban oil imports from countries without democracy, freedom to change religion, or freedom of speech.
  • Put compensating tariffs on foreign goods from countries with lower wages or lower environmental standards.

Freedom of Speech

  • Prohibit job termination based on political activities outside of work.

Immigration

Medical Care

Men's Rights

Money

  • Define the dollar as one ounce of pure silver minted by the US government.
  • Audit the Federal Reserve and make all their books and operations completely open to the public.

Real Estate

Regulation

Taxes

  • Require every employer and financial company to use the exact same printed and online format for every W-2, 1099, etc, and to make all financial data available to customers via standardized REST APIs. All fields must always have exactly the same names and be in the same positions. HR Block etc lobby to make sure this does not happen.
  • Increase taxes on non-productive rent-seeking and decrease taxes on income from productive work or sales. Swap the current maximum tax rates on income from work vs capital gains.
  • End Prop 13 in California.
  • Prohibit sales tax on used property that was already taxed per the full retail price when first sold.
  • Prohibit all public sector unions, especially teacher's unions and prison guard unions.

Transit

  • Give official federal priority to fast safe cheap rail transit in place of subsidies and favoritism for cars, oil, and highways.

Voting

  • Require proof of US citizenship to vote.
  • Establish the inalienability of the right to vote for all US citizens, whether in prison or not.
  • Publicly fund all congressional and presidential campaigns
  • Publicly post all bills two weeks in advance of Congressional vote. Require that Congressmen personally read entire bill before voting on it.
  • People should have a right to petition Congress regarding a specific proposal, and if they get enough signatures require a roll call vote in both houses of Congress on the verbatim topic of the petition, without amendments.

How you can help: If you agree with any or all of these proposals, please add your own feedback on the proposals and post links to the proposals on other websites.

#politics

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209   iwog   Feb 23, 9:31am     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

iwog says

The market value of the metal sets the price.

Which means the dollar would not be overvalued.

This means absolutely nothing. For example the price of everything on earth could increase by 500% due to population growth while a massive new silver discovery cuts the price of silver in half. OR speculation. OR a big economic depression. OR war. OR anything could cause a huge disconnect between the price of silver and the price of everything else. When you have a silver standard, all you're doing is indexing everything you buy to the price of silver. That's why it's a bad idea. Everyone who owns dollars will be a silver speculator and will be involuntarily making an investment in the price of a heavily used industrial metal.

210   iwog   Feb 23, 9:43am     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

If aliens circled the earth and said "You people of earth are now forced to convert to a hard money exchange standard!!!!" the only rational choice would be gold. Gold mining almost exactly approximates population growth. Only a small amount of the gold market is devoted to industrial use. Even when used for electronics, gold is not oxidized or lost in the process so nearly all gold ever used can be recovered. Gold is a lot more valuable so you don't need an armored truck to go to the mall. Finally gold is compact enough that banks can actually store it instead of needing a vault the size of a warehouse to keep a few hundred million dollars worth.

It's still an extraordinarily bad idea but at least it makes more sense than a silver standard.

211   Dan8267   Feb 23, 11:36am     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

You people of earth are now forced to convert to a hard money exchange standard!

Define "hard money exchange standard". Would cryptocurrency -- I know bad name as it's an implementation detail, not the defining feature -- count? That is, would a currency system in which there is a mathematical guarantee that money supply inflation is limited exponentially and thus cannot be debased?

iwog says

Gold mining almost exactly approximates population growth.

Perhaps right now, but there is no reason to expect that behavior to apply in the long run. There are limited supplies of gold on the Earth. Gold could be mined from asteroids. It could become cheap to fuse lead or other elements into gold in the not-so-distant future. The amount of gold is small enough that historically it has been very easy for a few powerful players to manipulate the gold market and siphon huge amounts of wealth from the public.

Why no have a IT system for currency that mathematical guarantees the supply of money will be directly proportional to the population at all times? There are enough smart people in the world to come up with a mathematical system that has any non-contradictory set of requirements that you can possibly imagine.

[stupid comment limit]

212   Dan8267   Feb 23, 11:41am     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Personally, I like the idea of having a single world currency called the credit for which the total supply is always exactly one credit. The credit can be divided in smaller parts, say trillions of a credit or picocredit or even picos for short. If there is ever a need to increase the number of discrete monetary units, this can be done trivially by adding smaller divisions like a quadrillionth of a credit or femtocredit or even femtos for short.

There. I just increased the money supply a thousand fold without
- redistributing any wealth
- breaking accounting metrics
- rendering long-term price comparisons meaningless or confusing
- requiring people to update the prices of goods and services to maintain real prices

If you want to prevent people from hording wealth or preventing savings from increasing in value due to population growth, then the proper solution to those two problems is a wealth tax. Saved currency counts as wealth, but so does everything else. So tax wealth rather than savings via currency debasement or income via the income tax, if you want to address the two forementioned issues.

I have yet to find anyone who can list any down sides to the above proposal over any alternative. But, as always, everyone is free to try. Challenging good ideas only makes them stronger.

213   iwog   Feb 23, 11:51am     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Dan8267 says

Define "hard money exchange standard". Would cryptocurrency -- I know bad name as it's an implementation detail, not the defining feature -- count? That is, would a currency system in which there is a mathematical guarantee that money supply inflation is limited exponentially and thus cannot be debased?

Nope, hard money is defined as money with intrinsic value. Data has no intrinsic value. It's identical to a federal reserve note but instead of a central bank controlling the amount of money in circulation, no one controls it and it's determined by a mathematical formula.

Dan8267 says

Perhaps right now, but there is no reason to expect that behavior to apply in the long run. There are limited supplies of gold on the Earth. Gold could be mined from asteroids. It could become cheap to fuse lead or other elements into gold in the not-so-distant future.

Again to be clear, I think basing the value of money on metals is a bad idea. I'm only saying that gold is a far more logical choice than silver.

214   indigenous   Feb 23, 12:19pm     ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

When you have a silver standard, all you're doing is indexing everything you buy to the price of silver. That's why it's a bad idea. Everyone who owns dollars will be a silver speculator and will be involuntarily making an investment in the price of a heavily used industrial metal.

Then use gold.

The current money supplier does this, how could gold be worse than this?

215   Dan8267   Feb 23, 12:29pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

Nope, hard money is defined as money with intrinsic value.

So intrinsic value does not have to be constant? If so, intrinsic value doesn't accomplish what you want, namely stable values of currency. If so, then again why not favor constant value over intrinsic value since that is what we are trying to ultimately accomplish.

iwog says

Again to be clear, I think basing the value of money on metals is a bad idea. I'm only saying that gold is a far more logical choice than silver.

I would think that if you had a metal-backed currency, the way to maximize value stability would be to include as many metals, particularly common ones, as you could. This would allow price fluctuations in the metals used in your basis to cancel each other out. It would do for your currency what an index fund does for your portfolio.

Of course, why limit yourself to metals. Why not include the values of all goods and services in the proportion of their total values? If you had such a metric, it would be mathematically identical to the single credit system I described above.

216   iwog   Feb 23, 1:06pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Dan8267 says

If so, intrinsic value doesn't accomplish what you want, namely stable values of currency.

Yup. That's why they created the federal reserve and abandoned the gold standard.

Dan8267 says

I would think that if you had a metal-backed currency, the way to maximize value stability would be to include as many metals, particularly common ones, as you could. This would allow price fluctuations in the metals used in your basis to cancel each other out. It would do for your currency what an index fund does for your portfolio.

Sure but you're still playing the commodities market with your savings. Furthermore how do you issue coins with 8 different metals? The integrity of the system depends on actual hard currency in bank vaults, otherwise you're dealing with a government system where your metals hoard could exist or not exist. It wouldn't matter. A hard money currency system is simply unneeded and like I argued before, if you want gold and silver money, get yourself some gold and silver money! Convince everyone in your town to take gold and silver at the spot price.

217   someone else   Feb 23, 1:09pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

The sticking point for me is that I simply do not like the Fed's ability to print unlimited supplies of money at essentially no cost.

This gives them massive power to steal from all individuals that hold dollars, and they have in fact stolen more than 95% of the purchasing power of the dollar over time. Why wouldn't they? They can get away with it.

I would rather have the power shift back to individuals, and limit the power of the Fed.

Doesn't have to be silver or gold, I just don't want them to have the ability to steal from me and from everyone else.

218   iwog   Feb 23, 1:15pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Patrick says

The sticking point for me is that I simply do not like the Fed's ability to print unlimited supplies of money at essentially no cost.

Necessary evil. You should make a transparent federal reserve and citizen audits part of your platform.

Patrick says

This gives them massive power to steal from all individuals that hold dollars, and they have in fact stolen more than 95% of the purchasing power of the dollar over time. Why wouldn't they? They can get away with it.

The winner in an inflationary environment is the borrower (investor) and the loser is the lender. (or hoarder) Since wages do indeed keep up, we can approximate for most workers it's a wash. This dynamic system of a slowly inflating currency creates wealth by forcing savers to invest. If inflation didn't exist, we would see far more money simply being stockpiled in bonds which is exactly the problem we have today with interest rates near 0%.

219   indigenous   Feb 23, 1:34pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Since wages do indeed keep up, we can approximate for most workers it's a wash.

Not that you understand this but it certainly does effect a workers standard of living.

220   iwog   Feb 23, 1:38pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

Not that you understand this but it certainly does effect a workers standard of living.

I would never make a statement like that utterly devoid of an argument, data, or even an explanation.

Why don't you show us exactly and specifically HOW workers have been harmed since 1911 and how it is directly related to inflation? I'd be fascinated to know your reasoning.

221   someone else   Feb 23, 1:45pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

I agree with iwog that some inflation is necessary. And I think silver is the way to get it without utterly debasing the dollar like the Fed does.

Current world supply of silver is about 777,000 tons:

http://demonocracy.info/infographics/world/silver/silver.html

That seems to be increasing at about 25,000 tons per year:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_silver_production

24 / 777 = 3%

So the world supply of silver is increasing at about 3% per year, which gives a nice small consistent inflation. This is why I prefer silver over gold, which is increasing much more slowly.

222   indigenous   Feb 23, 1:50pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Why don't you show us exactly and specifically HOW workers have been harmed since 1911 and how it is directly related to inflation? I'd be fascinated to know your reasoning.

It's called the Cantillon Effect, look it up.

223   indigenous   Feb 23, 2:04pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

Patrick says

I agree with iwog that some inflation is necessary.

Not true, refer the above inflation calculator.

Patrick says

So the world supply of silver is increasing at about 3% per year, which gives a nice small consistent inflation.

You seem to have the notion that the money supply has to grow. Why was this a problem when the US was on the gold standard.

224   Dan8267   Feb 23, 2:07pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

Sure but you're still playing the commodities market with your savings.

The bigger and more diverse the assets behind asset-backed currencies, the harder it is to manipulate the assets backing the currency and the more stable the value of the currency is. The ultimate asset-backed currency would be backed with all assets in the economy. This is what my single unit currency solution does. The only way to manipulate the currency is to change the overall wealth of the economy, and even then, it is pointless to do so since you cannot transfer purchasing power from one person to another under my proposed system. Denial of benefits eliminates all incentives to game the system.

225   Dan8267   Feb 23, 2:11pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Patrick says

I agree with iwog that some inflation is necessary.

Even if inflation is necessary, that does not imply that transferring purchasing power from group A (the common man) to group B (the bankers) is necessary. If you are going to debase the currency by increasing the money supply, you should do it in the exact opposite way we do it now. The transfer of purchasing power should go from the rich to the poor. This is easily accomplish by giving all newly circulated money to the public in the form of a guaranteed income that is equal for all persons.

The more inflation, the more equality. Let the owner class call for more inflation if they want. It will make them poorer and the poor better off. I suspect a nice balance would be found and maintained under that system because the incentive to print money won't be perversely affected by banker greed.

Put simply, the person who chooses how the pie is cut, should not also choose who gets which slice.

226   iwog   Feb 23, 2:57pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

It's called the Cantillon Effect, look it up

From Wiki:

In Essai, Cantillon provided an advanced version of John Locke's quantity theory of money, focusing on relative inflation and the velocity of money. ... The concept of relative inflation, or a disproportionate rise in prices among different goods in an economy, is now known as the Cantillon effect.

Explain to me and everyone else how in the hell this is an answer to the question: "Why don't you show us exactly and specifically HOW workers have been harmed since 1911 and how it is directly related to inflation?"

Which words to I need to clarify in that sentence? "Specifically?", "Harmed?", "How?"

227   someone else   Feb 23, 2:59pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

You seem to have the notion that the money supply has to grow. Why was this a problem when the US was on the gold standard.

I think there is a beneficial effect from small inflation, encouraging investment rather than simply hiding the money.

OTOH, when you invest, you also give the government a tip-off that you have money that can be confiscated somehow.

228   someone else   Feb 23, 3:08pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Dan8267 says

giving all newly circulated money to the public in the form of a guaranteed income that is equal for all persons.

That's an interesting idea. If we have to have any inflation, why not give the benefit directly to everyone?

The more inflation, the more equality. Let the owner class call for more inflation if they want.

Not really. The assets that the owner class owns (like nearly all the land) are pretty much impervious to inflation.

229   iwog   Feb 23, 3:11pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Patrick says

Not really. The assets that the owner class owns (like nearly all the land) are pretty much impervious to inflation.

The aristocracy also owns all the mines and the huge majority of precious metals stockpiles. It would be relatively easy for a couple of billionaires to corner the market on whatever asset you tie to the money supply. The Hunt Brothers did it in 1980 and it drove silver from $4 an ounce to $50.

The beautiful thing about fiat currency is that it cannot be hoarded or cornered to influence its value, at least as long as the central bank knows what it's doing.

230   Blurtman   Feb 23, 3:23pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

If the goal is to back the dollar by some immutable, non-manipulatable physical entry, try the energy of the sun.

231   iwog   Feb 23, 3:26pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

Explain to me and everyone else how in the hell this is an answer to the question: "Why don't you show us exactly and specifically HOW workers have been harmed since 1911 and how it is directly related to inflation?"

Which words to I need to clarify in that sentence? "Specifically?", "Harmed?", "How?"

Is there any possible reason why you consider this question unfair or unreasonable???

Usually when you say someone is harmed, you can describe the harm.

232   someone else   Feb 23, 3:41pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Blurtman says

If the goal is to back the dollar by some immutable, non-manipulatable physical entry, try the energy of the sun.

I was just thinking about energy as currency. But how do you deliver it? Barrels of oil?

The energy of the sun in particular is simply proportional to land area, so the rich have a lot more of it.

233   indigenous   Feb 23, 3:53pm     ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Which words to I need to clarify in that sentence? "Specifically?", "Harmed?", "How?"

From that same source

"In Essai, Cantillon provided an advanced version of John Locke's quantity theory of money, focusing on relative inflation and the velocity of money.[61] Cantillon suggested that inflation occurs gradually and that the new supply of money has a localised effect on inflation, effectively originating the concept of non-neutral money.[62] Furthermore, he posited that the original recipients of new money enjoy higher standards of living at the expense of later recipients.[63] The concept of relative inflation, or a disproportionate rise in prices among different goods in an economy, is now known as the Cantillon effect.[64] "

Those that receive the money first can invest ahead of the inflation. Those who receive the money later in the cycle have to pay the inflated price for items.

Anecdotally in the 50s and 60s almost all mothers were stay at home moms. Today the purchasing power has gone down to where almost all mothers have to work.

Anecdotally "The Washington, DC, metro area had the highest median income in the United States, according to the US Census Bureau, which released its latest median household income data last week. That's the good news.Sep 21, 2016"

Before the central bank people put money into a savings account and could retire on their savings because of interest and deflation which raised the value of money. As the inflation calculator shows a dollar became worth $1.83 112 years later strictly because of deflation.

Inflation and the "necessity" of inflation is a myth.

234   indigenous   Feb 23, 3:55pm     ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

IMO the best option will be Bitcoin.

235   iwog   Feb 23, 3:59pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

Furthermore, he posited that the original recipients of new money enjoy higher standards of living at the expense of later recipients.

Which is CLEARLY not true since standards of living have increased exponentially since 1911. Try again.

indigenous says

Before the central bank people put money into a savings account and could retire on their savings because of interest and deflation which raised the value of money. As the inflation calculator shows a dollar became worth $1.83 112 years later strictly because of deflation.

Unbelievable. How about the fact that most banks went bankrupt? That your odds of losing 100% of your money in a bank failure were extremely high? Or do you not consider a bank failure to be 'harm'?

Did you know that in 1873, 70% of the banks in New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia went insolvent?

236   Dan8267   Feb 23, 3:59pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

Patrick says

Not really. The assets that the owner class owns (like nearly all the land) are pretty much impervious to inflation.

That's true, and it mitigates the effect. However, you can impose a wealth tax if the goal is to prevent monetary or material hording.

237   curious2   Feb 23, 4:01pm     ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike   quote    

People should have a right to petition Congress regarding a specific proposal, and if they get enough signatures require a roll call vote in both houses of Congress on the verbatim topic of the petition, without amendments.

238   indigenous   Feb 23, 4:03pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Which is CLEARLY not true since standards of living have increased exponentially since 1911.

It's absolutely true, we are not talking about wage inflation. We are talking about the lag time.iwog says

Unbelievable. How about the fact that most banks went bankrupt? That your odds of losing 100% of your money in a bank failure were extremely high? Or do you not consider a bank failure to be 'harm'?

Did you know that in 1873, 70% of the banks in New York

That is a problem with banking being localized rather than centralized. Canada has never had this problem because their banking is centralized.

239   iwog   Feb 23, 4:05pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

That is a problem with banking being localized rather than centralized. Canada has never had this problem because their banking is centralized.

Hmmmm.......a centralized bank as opposed to a local bank. One might even say..........and please correct me if I'm wrong here, that you might call this a 'central bank'?

Again....unbelievable that I'm even having this conversation.

240   indigenous   Feb 23, 4:06pm     ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

Dan8267 says

Patrick says

Not really. The assets that the owner class owns (like nearly all the land) are pretty much impervious to inflation.

That's true, and it mitigates the effect. However, you can impose a wealth tax if the goal is to prevent monetary or material hording.

Home prices skyrocketed because of the bubble caused by Greenspan's lowering of the interest rates in 2002 to 2004. This was an example of the Cantillon Effect

241   iwog   Feb 23, 4:07pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

Home prices skyrocketed before the bubble caused by Greenspan's lowering of the interest rates in 2002 to 2004. This was an example of the Cantillon Effect

Except none of that happened, the bubble wasn't caused by Greenpan lowering the discount rate, and free money generated from fraudulent bond selling as prescribed by YOUR free market ideology was entirely responsible and indeed all that was necessary.

242   indigenous   Feb 23, 4:08pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Hmmmm.......a centralized bank as opposed to a local bank. One might even say..........and please correct me if I'm wrong here, that you might call this a 'central bank'?

No you have to pay attention I said centralized bankS, not a central bank.

243   indigenous   Feb 23, 4:08pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Except none of that happened, the bubble wasn't caused by Greenpan lowering the discount rate, and free money generated from fraudulent bond selling as prescribed by YOUR free market ideology was entirely responsible and indeed all that was necessary.

Nope it was ALL Greenspan

244   iwog   Feb 23, 4:08pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

indigenous says

No you have to pay attention I said centralized bankS, not a central bank.

Seriously I can't stand this much longer. Coffee is about to explode all over my desk.

245   someone else   Feb 23, 4:09pm     ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike   quote    

curious2 says

People should have a right to petition Congress regarding a specific proposal, and if they get enough signatures require a roll call vote in both houses of Congress on the verbatim topic of the petition, without amendments.

Hey, that's good!

I want to limit my list to 40, so I'll have to drop something to add that.

246   Dan8267   Feb 23, 4:09pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

iwog says

How about the fact that most banks went bankrupt?

Banks fail because lending and money storage are married. They shouldn't be.

The function of securely storing money and easily accessing it has nothing to do with lending. There should be two separate and isolated types of institutions for these two independent areas of responsibility. They should even be called different things. Let's call the storage structure a bank, as that makes sense. Then we call the lending structure a lender. By this distinction, banks do not lend. Lenders lend, and lenders do not provide banking services.

Banks provide the following services for the customer.
1. Provide a secure place to store your money. Physical or virtual doesn't really matter.
2. Provide secure deposits like direct deposit. Dirt cheap to do so as it's all electronic.
3. Allow you access to your money through mechanisms like withdraws (if there is physical currency), transfers (if there is more than one bank), and electronic payments (like debit cards).
4. Can also provide financial advise based on your financial state and history.

Banks provide the following services for the state.
1. Detecting and reporting tax evasion.
2. Preventing counterfeiting.
3. Preventing money laundering.
4. Preventing welfare and other social service fraud.
5. Providing a treasure trove of information about the economy down to the level of an individual.
6. Making it trivially easy for the state to confiscate wealth.

[stupid comment limit]

247   indigenous   Feb 23, 4:09pm     ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote    

iwog says

Seriously I can't stand this much longer. Coffee is about to explode all over my desk.

I have to admit it is fun pissing you off. None the less you are not hearing what I'm saying.

248   Dan8267   Feb 23, 4:10pm     ↑ like   ↓ dislike   quote    

There is no reason that we need more than one bank to do all the above. There is no reason for a private bank. This is clearly something that is best done by the state, and the state gets sooooooo many benefits from it that it should absorb the trivial per customer costs -- hell, it saves the state money on law enforcement -- and provide all the services in the best way for free. It even allows the state to improve the financial state of its citizens allowing it to have a better economy, and thus also more tax revenues.

Lenders can be private institutions and if they fail it's the investors who lose out. Lenders won't be able to take the economy down with them.

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