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Girl Scouts should be allowed to bake their own cookies


By Patrick   Follow   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 4:31am PST   2,530 views   21 comments
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A good example of over-regulation is that Girl Scouts are not legally allowed to bake and sell their own cookies, but instead are forced to work for the 1% that owns the factories.

Over-regulation is one way we are trapped and forced to serve our corporate masters.

How many poisonings or fatalities could there really be from home-baked cookies?

When was it first forbidden for Girl Scouts to bake their own cookies without a kitchen inspection and business license? I'm guessing sometime in the 1960's.

How can we most effectively fight this ridiculous rule?

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Huntington Moneyworth III, Esq   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 4:40am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike     Comment 1

I just ate a batch of my own homemade brownies.

What were we talking about again?

TMAC54   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 4:50am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 2

If Gubmint says yes. They can be held liable. Soooo !
We pay taxs for their solutions. They like the money more than your happiness.

TMAC54   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 4:55am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 3


This is a photo of the Girl Scouts of Saudi Arabia. They don't even look like Terrorists !

Nomograph   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 7:40am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 4

Patrick says

A good example of over-regulation is that Girl Scouts are not legally allowed to bake and sell their own cookies, but instead are forced to work for the 1% that owns the factories.

Complete BS. Individual Girl Scouts absolutely CAN bake cookies and sell them.

What the CANNOT do is bake cookies and sell them as Girl Scout cookies. Can a Domino's employee bake his own pizza at home and sell it as Domino's Pizza?

Patrick says

When was it first forbidden for Girl Scouts to bake their own cookies without a kitchen inspection and business license? I'm guessing sometime in the 1960's

I would guess earlier even. Do you think food service industry inspection is really a bad idea? I don't. Do you think having tens of thousands of girl scouts all baking cookies of various, dubious, and inconsistent quality is the best fundraising policy for GSA? I don't. I think it's be a terrible idea that would fail miserably.

illustrateth   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 10:23am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 5

Well, they are cracking down on lemonade stands:

http://www.ktnv.com/multimedia/videos/?bctid=1077252078001

http://www.necn.com/03/28/11/Homeowners-association-tells-kids-to-shu/landing_business.html?blockID=492250&feedID=4209

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/07/15/main20079838.shtml

TPB   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 10:40am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)     Comment 6

Chin up, a Father was arrested in Canada because his daughter drew a picture of a toy gun in school.

http://www.therecord.com/iphone/news/article/676150--man-shocked-by-arrest-after-daughter-draws-picture-of-gun-at-school

Oh the humanity, well what was it?

www.therecord.com/iphone/topstories/article/676744

TMAC54   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 11:18am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 7

TPB says

Oh the humanity, well what was it?

www.therecord.com/iphone/topstories/article/676744

This is what we must expect when we aks gubmints help. I met a lady leaving a hospital emergency room. She stated her five year old stuck a twig in his ear. She continued, Child services was called to the exam room where they asked the child questions like, Did Mommy stick something in your ear ? Did Mommy tell you to stick something in your ear ? It Seems, One Mommy screwed it up for everybody. On the other hand, some gubmint agencies soon become dependent on severing family relationships.

Dan8267   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 1:17pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 8

Nomograph says

What the CANNOT do is bake cookies and sell them as Girl Scout cookies. Can a Domino's employee bake his own pizza at home and sell it as Domino's Pizza?

Girl Scouts are unpaid employees. Gotta love that.

Still, whenever one comes to the door selling cookies, I'm a softie and buy a dozen boxes.

Patrick   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 1:58pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 9

Nomograph says

Complete BS. Individual Girl Scouts absolutely CAN bake cookies and sell them.

What the CANNOT do is bake cookies and sell them as Girl Scout cookies. Can a Domino's employee bake his own pizza at home and sell it as Domino's Pizza?

No, I don't think it's legal for an uninspected unlicensed Girl Scout to sell her own home-baked cookies. Even if they've been baked at 350 degrees for 10 minutes.

The argument that she shouldn't be able to sell her own home-baked cookies "as Girl Scout cookies" is even worse than saying it's not hygenic. She's a member of the Girl Scouts, not an employee!

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 11:29pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike     Comment 10

It's just against the law for bomb-throwing anarchist lesbian abortionist cults like GSA to make cookies.

Nomograph   Sat, 25 Feb 2012, 11:34pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)     Comment 11

Patrick says

No, I don't think it's legal for an uninspected unlicensed Girl Scout to sell her own home-baked cookies. Even if they've been baked at 350 degrees for 10 minutes.

I didn't say there wouldn't be any licensure involved, but it's not a big deal. Did you know there are commercial kitchens you can rent for short periods of time to do small batch production? These kitchens have all the necessary inspections already done. There's even space available right in Menlo Park dedicated to baking:

http://www.bizkitchens.com/commercial-kitchen-rental-in-menlo-park--ca.1888.html

http://www.bizkitchens.com/commercial-kitchen-space-available-in-menlo-park--ca.1133.html

I have a friend who launched a homemade granola business and produced it in her kitchen. For larger orders she rented commercial kitchen space by the hour.

Framing the argument as little girls being forced to work for the 1% is a bit of a stretch, any way you look at it. There are plenty of options if you explore around a little bit.

Patrick   Sun, 26 Feb 2012, 1:14am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 12

Nomograph says

Did you know there are commercial kitchens you can rent for short periods of time to do small batch production?

Actually, I didn't know that. Seems like a reasonable compromise. Maybe the Girl Scouts should be using those.

But little girls are being taught that they should rely on Keebler, which is Kellogg, which is definitely a large corporation whose largest shareholder (23% of shares) is "Bank of New York Mellon Corporation":

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/mh?s=K+Major+Holders

So it definitely is true that the labor of lots of little girls is being used to enrich the 1%.

thunderlips11   Sun, 26 Feb 2012, 10:59pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 13

Patrick says

A good example of over-regulation is that Girl Scouts are not legally allowed to bake and sell their own cookies, but instead are forced to work for the 1% that owns the factories.

Fortunately, there are cottage industry laws being passed in many states, both Oregon and Florida have them. But these don't always help so much.

Girl Scouts could certainly obtain the pre-made dough and bake them themselves in home kitchens, then package them themselves, too. Good entrepreneurship training.

Problem with home production is that domestic ovens, particularly electric ones, are not suited to making large quantities of baked goods. There's a difference between baking a few dozen cookies at home for party/family consumption vs. thousands of cookies to sell to the public in boxes; or a loaf of bread or two versus a scores of loaves.

We're actually encountering the "annoying quantity problem" on a regular basis when organizations only order 50-150 cakes from us. It's too small an order for us to make (or only token amounts of) money after paying kitchen rental costs; but too large an order for us to in a complete reasonable time in our home oven with a 6qt mixer.

One great business idea would be to have rental kitchens available at an affordable price in 4-hour blocks. Right now, most rental kitchens are leased out by caterers when they don't need the space. Problem with that is, it's damn nigh impossible to lease space during the holidays when people buy lots of baked goods as gifts or for gatherings; as that is when the caterer-owner also needs the space for his own business.

But another problem is refrigeration: You generally can't store stuff in rented kitchens, and most people can't store 50 loaves of bread in their freezer. Maybe these rented kitchens could also rent mini-walk ins.

Nomograph   Sun, 26 Feb 2012, 11:18pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 14

Patrick says

But little girls are being taught that they should rely on Keebler, which is Kellogg, which is definitely a large corporation whose largest shareholder (23% of shares) is "Bank of New York Mellon Corporation":

Both the corporation and the Girl Scouts benefit from the relationship.

Isn't this exactly the kind of non-parasitic business undertaking that we want the banks to be participating in, rather than subprime mortgages and credit default swaps?

TPB   Sun, 26 Feb 2012, 11:37pm PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 15

Girls can't even sell Lemon aide in their own yard anymore with someone coming up and slapping a cease and desist action on them.
Nomo is all defending the man, but I would love to see what would happen if a Girl Scout troop were to bake up a batch of Macadamia nut cookies wrapped each one in saran wrap, put them in a plate with a sign that said "$1 each". Then placed that plate of homemade cookies next to the boxes of cookies for sale, on that table set up out side of K-Mart. The GS troop set up to sell GSC on a Saturday afternoon. Not calling them Girlscout cookies, just selling while in uniform, and next to the Girl Scout branded cookies.
I bet corporate would come down on them, like the Almighty power of the Man.

david1   Mon, 27 Feb 2012, 4:30am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 16

Nomograph says

Both the corporation and the Girl Scouts benefit from the relationship.

What do the girl scouts do besides sell cookies?

Honestly...can the parent of a girl scout tell me how much of the total yearly meeting time is taken up by preparing for cookie season, having cookie season, and concluding cookie season, etc?

Further, what % of the total yearly troop budget is supplemented by cookie sales?

Granted I do not have a girl scout in the family, and I am sure they have meetings throughout the year regarding other skills, but the only time you hear about or even see a girl scout is when she is peddling cookies.

I would call it a symbiotic relationship if a small percentage of the girls scouts time is taken up by cookies while a large portion of their budget is supplemented by the income. The way I see, Keebler isn't making one cent off Girl Scout cookies without the Scouts themselves, so they better be giving a great deal as well in order to call it fair.

tatupu70   Mon, 27 Feb 2012, 4:35am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 17

TMAC54 says

I met a lady leaving a hospital emergency room

Any post from TMAC that begins "I met" is almost certainly pure BS.

Vicente   Mon, 27 Feb 2012, 7:56am PST   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 18

This is part and parcel of the child-shilling game. How many boxes of GooGoo Clusters, or rolls of wrapping paper have we all bought, because the neighbor or co-worker's kids need you to buy from them.

Old-fashioned bake sales, yes that's the way to go. When I was Industrial Arts in High School we made and sold golf-tee peg-board games for fund-raising. OK there was one professional piece of the project, we paid to have the boxes made for it.

meggymoo   Thu, 5 Apr 2012, 11:01pm PDT   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 19

david1 says

Honestly...can the parent of a girl scout tell me how much of the total yearly meeting time is taken up by preparing for cookie season, having cookie season, and concluding cookie season, etc?

Better than a parent: a former Girl Scout: 11 years (1993-2004). Total meeting time for cookie sales: part of ONE MEETING. Maybe the first year or so an entire meeting because it was new and there was a lot to go over. Ask any Girl Scout and she'll tell you that the cookie sale is the most exciting part of scouting especially in the beginning. You learned business skills and selling skills, and money skills (in each division of GS there is a merit badge associated with money sense usually completed around that time). AND for safety reasons you were NOT allowed to sell door to door.

Girl Scouts are members by CHOICE of the Girl Scouts of America AND at no point are girls FORCED to sell cookies. True, we may not have seen actual money for our time spent selling and delivering cookies there were incentives and troop funds (aka "Cookie Dough") earned that was used (girl and parent choice) for individual trip fees or pooled to do bigger trips.

My troop used "Cookie Dough" funds for community service supplies (one year we purchased toys for a homeless shelter- girls plan!), summer trips (spelunking in Kentucky, Senior trip to Mexico, visiting a family from our troop that moved to NYC) and after we graduated (I stayed thru high school) a check, of our remaining funds, was written out to us (the individual girl).

Before you start criticizing a legitimate NON-PROFIT organization -> get your facts straight. And if you have such a problem with cookies- don't buy them.

david1   Fri, 6 Apr 2012, 3:00am PDT   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 20

meggymoo says

Total meeting time for cookie sales: part of ONE MEETING. Maybe the first year or so an entire meeting

So you are telling me that you spent part of one meeting to prep for cookie sales, receive the cookies, and sell the cookies, etc.? I am not talking about the weekly (monthly? daily? I don't know) official girl scout meetings, I am talking about the total time a young girl devotes to all things girl scouts.

So that would be the sum of girl scout meetings, any spelunking trip, standing at walmart selling the cookies - anything gorl scout related...

What % of that is taken up solely in cookie related activity?

And I am not criticising the girls scouts by the way. I only made the comment that the only time I am aware of a girls membership in the organization is during cookie season. But I don't have a daughter in the scouts. I was asking a question about it so I could know.

What is the take on the cookie dough? How much per $4 (or is it $5) box?

Again not asking to be critical, I just wondered...

Honest Abe   Sun, 8 Apr 2012, 5:44am PDT   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike     Comment 21

Patrick, I'm with you. Thanks for noticing the over-reach of our busy body government. What, they don't have ANYTHING else better to do with their time than focus on girl scouts???

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