Birth Control: Over the Counter?


By zzyzzx   Follow   Wed, 21 Nov 2012, 10:48am   575 views   9 comments
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http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/birth-control-over-counter-155700568.html

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) announced yesterday its official recommendation that oral contraceptives should be sold over the counter, without a prescription. Plenty of paperwork still stands in the way of this monumental moment in women's health, but it appears as though the United States is one step closer to granted broader access to contraceptive for all women.

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  1. upisdown


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    1   11:06am Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)  

    Is that article meant to mean that it's "shining" everyone that reads it?

    Personally, i think that the catholic church should hand out birth control pills, because they wouldn't steal any (little boys can't get pregnant), but only to people that they don't like.

  2. zzyzzx


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    2   11:59am Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike (1)  

    I think we'll see this, since once it's OTC it won't be covered by your medical insurance anymore.

  3. mell


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    3   11:59am Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (3)   Dislike  

    I think that's a good recommendation, it will drive down health care costs a bit. Why pay an MD $250 to get a prescription for contraceptives?

  4. mell


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    4   12:01pm Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)  

    zzyzzx says

    I think we'll see this, since once it's OTC it won't be covered by your medical insurance anymore.

    And that's good too, if you want to have sex take the responsibility to be able to afford it. You could likely still get discounts or some for free from charitable organizations that want to promote family planning.

  5. zzyzzx


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    5   12:07pm Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike (1)  

    mell says

    I think that's a good recommendation, it will drive down health care costs a bit. Why pay an MD $250 to get a prescription for contraceptives?

    A doctor visit to get a prescription written in your area only costs $250???

  6. mell


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    6   12:10pm Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    zzyzzx says

    mell says

    I think that's a good recommendation, it will drive down health care costs a bit. Why pay an MD $250 to get a prescription for contraceptives?

    A doctor visit to get a prescription written in your area only costs $250???

    Yeah, if it's only a consultation (and possibly a prescription, no tests) it is around $250 here in the bay area. I thought that was on the high side, but I don't now about other states. In Europe it's roughly around $100 or less.

  7. curious2


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    7   12:59pm Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (3)   Dislike  

    Everything should be OTC. Generic OTC pills cost less than $0.10 each. Instead we have a regulatory system that makes everything horribly expensive, then struggles to shift the cost of that around through insurance, adding yet more layers of cost. We have this system because of lobbying and politicians pursuing their own self-interest, and because people are too willing to give up their liberty and accept being passengers - especially if they think it's "free".

  8. Suburban Gal


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    8   4:06pm Wed 21 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    OTC birth control IS available, it's called a condom. But there are still huge numbers of "unwanted" pregnancies every day. I put that in quotes because it's so easy to avoid yet millions of people refuse to take responsibility. If you really don't want to get pregnant, you can't get pregnant.

    As for the pill being OTC, I don't know about that. I thought the reason it was prescribed is because of different situations, other health issues to consider, and physical issues required different types and/or doses of pills.

    I think the greatest potential downside to this is the fact that some women have access to free or low cost prescription pills via Medicaid and health insurance. Since, health insurance doesn’t typically cover OTC drugs like ibuprofen and cough syrup, it'd mean those women who receive it free wouldn't receive it for free anymore and those women who receive it at low cost would have to pay more for it. I also think leaving it as prescription-only would only reinforce yearly Pap tests and pelvic exams for women.

    Ultimately, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will make the decision about whether the pill can be sold OTC. The FDA makes this type of change for one brand of pill at a time, and there are over 100 brands of pill now sold in the U.S. and in order to switch, a drug company that makes an FDA-approved pill would have to support two new studies: one showing that women can understand the instructions for taking an OTC pill and one showing "women can appropriately self-select themselves as candidates for the pill and that they can use it safely and effectively for some period of time." This process will be expensive. Someone will have to ante up about $10,000,000 for the two studies and so far no pill manufacturers or funders have even stepped forward to do so.

  9. elliemae


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    9   10:46am Thu 22 Nov 2012   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)   Protected  

    I don't know how this would work - with different strengths and types of pills according to the woman's specific mediical needs, I mean.

    I do agree that they should be available, but they should still see a physician regularly. Especially if they have health conditions.

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