There's More To Real Estate Than Meets The Eye (Advertisement)

How Employers Alienate Qualified Job Candidates


By Patrick   Follow   Sat, 12 Jan 2013, 4:48pm   2,407 views   37 comments
In Menlo Park CA 94025   Watch (1)   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (3)   Dislike (1)  

During my recent job search, I ran across many ways that companies ruin their chances of recruiting good employees. These problems never get fixed, because:

1. Applicants are unlikely to complain, since they want a job.
2. Rejected employees never get a chance to complain.
3. Accepted employees no longer care about the issues once hired

So HR (Human Resources) departments keep making the same mistakes over and over, at great cost to their companies. Here is some honest advice for HR departments:

* Do not make the applicant fill out any forms. Increasing the time it takes to apply decreases the number of quality applications you will get. The majority of places I applied to demanded that I laboriously copy the data from my resume into tiny little boxes on some web form. If you want to piss off applicants and drive them away, then by all means, yes, treat them like data-entry clerks and they will just go apply somewhere else. But if you actually want encourage good people to apply, do not force them to use Jobvite or to suffer similar pain from other applicant tracking systems, especially not Taleo (OMG, what pain!). Make it as easy as possible. Let them simply email their resume to you.

* Do not demand that applicants submit resumes in MS Word or PDF format, rejecting all other formats. Be liberal in what you accept. Again, make it as easy as possible for the candidate. It should be possible to apply for a job with a single email. Have a human being acknowledge receipt of the applicant's email. Do not use auto-responders.

* Say exactly where the job is within the job listing itself. It is amazing but true that job listings frequently don't even say what city the job is in. Even "San Francisco" is not specific enough. Give an address.

* Be flexible about the application process. I had one interview scheduled in San Francisco with company A and noticed that I had a phone screen scheduled with company B just up Market Street for later the same day. So I asked if I could simply stop by and talk in person to company B rather than doing it on the phone. Company B said no, they don't make any changes to their fixed HR procedure. That gives you a hint of how working there would be.

* Don't make big decisions about the applicant based on small questions. Many companies have non-technical HR people do technical phone screens that ask some bit of computing trivia and immediately reject applicants who don't happen to answer with exactly what the HR person was told the "right" answer is, even if the applicant gave a perfectly valid answer.

* Don't use trick questions, or questions that require achieving some particular insight on the spot. If the applicant has not heard that question before, he might or might not get the right answer under the pressure of an interview, but either way it's uncorrelated with his likely performance on the job. Conversely, if he has heard the trick question before, he can deceive you into thinking he's a genius when actually he's just familiar with that question already. Fashionable questions quickly make the rounds.

* Don't delay. Companies that delay getting back to an applicant are at a huge disadvantage to companies that get back quickly. I once interviewed at Yahoo and had to wait 6 weeks for a job offer. I also interviewed at Amazon and got an offer in 6 days. Even though Amazon was offering a bit less money, I took that job because Yahoo had pissed me off by taking so long, and the delay seemed to show internal disorganization or apathy.

* Do not fail to reply. If you're going to reject an applicant, do it, and do it quickly. Honestly explain why you're rejecting them. Just leaving applicants hanging is an insult. They will remember it and tell friends, and your company will accumulate bad karma. Generic rejections also accumulate bad karma. Explain the decision, and perhaps invite the employee to apply for a different job at the company, or to re-apply when he has some other particular skills or experience. That will generate good karma even from a rejection.

* Watch out for HR people who have a chip on their shoulder. HR people know when they are hiring people with a higher status than themselves, and some of them relish the temporary power they have to block an application.

* Never pay bonuses to HR that depend on how little pay they get the applicant to accept. It sets up an adversarial relationship. Never use contract recruiters or headhunters at all, only full-time employees of your company. Contract recruiters and headhunters do not care at all about the long-term success of your company.

* Do not be arrogant. Google is probably still the most self-congratulatory company, with contests like "Are you smart enough to work at Google?" These make it seem like Google is run by insecure geeky teenagers who need to continuously demonstrate that they are smart because they are afraid that perhaps they were actually just lucky.

* Do not skimp on lunch during the interview. If the applicant is going to be there at lunchtime, make sure it's high-quality. Applicants know that the company probably is not going to treat them any better as an employee later, so a dismal or non-existent lunch will be perceived as a bad sign.

* Show you care about the workers by giving them the same facilities as the executives. I showed up for one interview at the headquarters of a company in a tall building with a stunning view of San Francisco Bay. Then the HR person took me to an ugly building nearby where the actual programmers all sat on a lower floor with no windows in synthetic cubicles, explaining that the beautiful building was just for the executives and for HR. I've worked at Intel and it was very democratic. Even though Intel office space is just a sea of cubicles, the executives also sit in them like any other worker. Capitalism ironically works best when the internal structure of a corporation is communist.

Please add your own HR nightmare experiences below, and forward this post to corporate executives and to HR people as a public service. You can use the "Share" link below the title on this page to send it.

Viewing Comments 1-37 of 37     Last »     See most liked comments

  1. carrieon


    Follow
    Befriend
    1 threads
    228 comments

    1   5:44pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike  

    Two sides can play this game. May I suggest making generic business cards with only your name, phone number and email address.

    When making a favorable impression with people and businesses you care about, hand them out to create interest in contacting you for more information.

  2. APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch


    Follow
    Befriend (27)
    311 threads
    8,558 comments

    2   6:37pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (5)   Dislike  

    If you have to go through HR to go to work for a company you're not being placed by a high enough authority.

  3. Blurtman


    Follow
    Befriend
    151 threads
    1,105 comments

    3   7:53pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    HR recruiting for technical positions - a total disaster. They evaluate smiles, dress and grooming, but would pass over Einstein himself.

    Once I arranged an interview with HR by going over their head, to a senior manager. He arranged for my telephone interview, it was scheduled, but the HR bozo bailed on the call. What can you do? Complain? Either way you are fooked.

  4. Peter P


    Follow
    Befriend (4)
    117 threads
    17,701 comments

    4   8:37pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    What are trick questions? I think brain teasers and problem-solving type questions are useful.

    Just ask the candidate to inform you if he/she heard of that before.

    You can usually tell if she is coming up with an answer? Or if she is merely recalling the answer.

    Body language is everything. Look into her eyes.

    Sometimes, the purpose of asking a question is to find out more about the thinking process of the candidate. Is she over-complicating things? Or worse, is she trying too hard? The answer is usually unimportant.

  5. Peter P


    Follow
    Befriend (4)
    117 threads
    17,701 comments

    5   8:40pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    Blurtman says

    They evaluate smiles, dress and grooming, but would pass over Einstein himself.

    Einstein might or might not be a great employee. A company does not hire to reward talent, it hires to fulfill a function.

    That said, remember that in reality a natural person makes the hiring decision. You are hired if you consciously or subconsciously align with her will to power.

    It pays to reverse-engineer the psychology of your interviewer.

    In the end, you want the hiring manger to find reasons to accept you. The same set of facts framed differently in the mind of a "decider" will have very different results.

  6. Peter P


    Follow
    Befriend (4)
    117 threads
    17,701 comments

    6   8:43pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    For companies like Google, it really depends who will interview you.

    Sometimes, they ask really easy questions. Sometimes, the interviewers may be out to get you. It is like the roll of a dice.

    One tip: PROJECTION

    Always project a confident but agreeable persona. First, you will not perform if you put pressure on yourself. Second, your hiring manager wants a competent person who will not turn into a threat.

  7. Patrick


    Follow
    Befriend (55)
    5,610 threads
    6,305 comments
    male
    Menlo Park, CA

    7   8:49pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike (1)  

    Peter P says

    What are trick questions? I think brain teasers and problem-solving type questions are useful.

    Just ask the candidate to inform you if he/she heard of that before.

    You can usually tell if she is coming up with an answer? Or if she is merely recalling the answer.

    Body language is everything. Look into her eyes.

    I assure you I have in years past brilliantly acted the part of seeming to think about a brain-teaser question and then of coming up with the answer after waiting just long enough to make it believable, yet still quickly enough to look smart. Several times. You wouldn't have caught me.

    I feel no guilt, because brain teasers are utterly irrelvant to actual work in a real job.

  8. Peter P


    Follow
    Befriend (4)
    117 threads
    17,701 comments

    8   8:50pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    Patrick says

    I assure you I have in years past brilliantly acted the part of seeming to think about a brain-teaser question and then of coming up with the answer after waiting just long enough to make it believable, yet still quickly enough to look smart. Several times. You wouldn't have caught me.

    THAT is problem-solving on a higher level, isn't it? ;-)

  9. New Renter


    Follow
    Befriend (3)
    28 threads
    5,001 comments
    San Jose, CA

    9   9:37pm Sat 12 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    Patrick,

    Going through a job search myself I understand your frustration; however I also recognize the reality of the job market. There are HUNDREDS of applicants for most jobs. Applicants are screened arbitrarily - its a numbers game. The hoops that HR sets up is simply a way to eliminate 99% of the applicants to a manageable number. They do not care about your (or my) feelings. They don't care about being perceived as rude and why should they? The only accountability HR has is to their company and being sure the WRONG person is not hired. If the position goes unfilled so be it - that gives weight to the "critical shortage of STEM employees" myth.

  10. APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch


    Follow
    Befriend (27)
    311 threads
    8,558 comments

    10   2:57am Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (7)   Dislike  

    underwaterman says

    I've also been in google's cafeteria and visited friends on apples campus. Have you noticed the age of the people and distribution?

    Had to work for a project at Google SF and found the place creepy. The primary colors scheme and the furniture had a grade school vibe that could only get weirder with life-sized blow ups of Pedobear. Cafeteria? Assholes, get a fucking coffee and a smoke and get the fuck back to work.

  11. Patrick


    Follow
    Befriend (55)
    5,610 threads
    6,305 comments
    male
    Menlo Park, CA

    11   8:06am Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike (1)  

    underwaterman says

    Linkedin and using your connections there get you thru to a hiring manager and bypassing HR on the first round much faster than going thru recruiters in my experience.

    Yes, that's the best solution for individuals IMHO. You have to bypass HR and make personal email contact with the hiring manager. If you can do that and the hiring manager thinks you're a good fit for the job, lots of these other problems go away.

    I also ran into the weird issue of now being older than most of the people interviewing me, but there are advantages too, in that the hiring manager is usually my age.

  12. Patrick


    Follow
    Befriend (55)
    5,610 threads
    6,305 comments
    male
    Menlo Park, CA

    12   1:22pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike (1)  

    New Renter says

    The hoops that HR sets up is simply a way to eliminate 99% of the applicants to a manageable number. They do not care about your (or my) feelings. They don't care about being perceived as rude and why should they? The only accountability HR has is to their company and being sure the WRONG person is not hired.

    That seems like short-term thinking to me. HR people should care about being perceived as rude if they want good applicants in the future. Or even business relationships in the future. Just look on LinkedIn if you want to see how closely interconnected everything really is. It never pays to be rude.

  13. ForRentSign


    Follow
    Befriend
    3 comments

    13   1:23pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (6)   Dislike  

    I'm in advertising, a career with an extremely high churn rate. Accounts come and go and jobs along with them, so you're virtually always in the job market. I've never been unemployed for more than a few weeks, because I learned early on how to interview.

    You go in and interview them. And no, I don't mean go in and act like an arrogant git. You ask questions and get THEM talking about what THEY want. It's easy. You simply ask questions like "What are you hoping your new hire will really do for your company?"

    And let them do the talking. Oh - and LISTEN to the answers. Then you tell them how you can meet their needs, WITHOUT making them listen to you babble on. Be concise. They'll enjoy the interview and think you have world class communication skills.

    Come to think of it it's no different from any other human interaction. Everybody wants to be heard. Learn how to listen.

  14. Peter P


    Follow
    Befriend (4)
    117 threads
    17,701 comments

    14   1:52pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (3)   Dislike  

    Patrick says

    HR people should care about being perceived as rude if they want good applicants in the future.

    HR people are people. They care about themselves. They just need hire people that make them look good long enough.

    In many large companies, being able to detect who is sleeping with who is more important than actually doing work.

  15. MershedPerturders


    Follow
    Befriend (1)
    21 threads
    493 comments

    15   4:06pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    who are we !@#$ing kidding here?

    our economy HAS GONE TO SHIT.

    the businesses can't hire anyone because the taxes are so !@#$ing high.

  16. MershedPerturders


    Follow
    Befriend (1)
    21 threads
    493 comments

    16   4:09pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    underwaterman says

    Just to expand on the age discrimination. I interviewed at VMware and Netapp a few of years ago. I've also been in google's cafeteria and visited friends on apples campus. Have you noticed the age of the people and distribution? There seems to be a definite age bias going on for the young in these tech companies. You can read about it on glassdoor.com also.

    they just want 'tech people' to learn THEIR technology. The don't want well rounded people. The industry simply does not respect knowledge at all. They dont want expertise they just want one answer: YES.

  17. APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch


    Follow
    Befriend (27)
    311 threads
    8,558 comments

    17   4:13pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike  

    The easiest way to the HR ladies' hearts is to demonstrate how you can pick up half-dollars with your dick without bending at the knees.

  18. mell


    Follow
    Befriend (7)
    255 threads
    3,075 comments
    San Francisco, CA

    18   4:28pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    APOCALYPSEFUCK is Shostakovich says

    The easiest way to the HR ladies' hearts is to demonstrate how you can pick up half-dollars with your dick without bending at the knees.

    Or fetch that binder 2 cubicles away they need so desperately with it.

  19. New Renter


    Follow
    Befriend (3)
    28 threads
    5,001 comments
    San Jose, CA

    19   4:44pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    Patrick says

    That seems like short-term thinking to me. HR people should care about being perceived as rude if they want good applicants in the future. Or even business relationships in the future. Just look on LinkedIn if you want to see how closely interconnected everything really is. It never pays to be rude.

    Again hundred of applicants per job with no reason to believe the future holds anything different.

  20. New Renter


    Follow
    Befriend (3)
    28 threads
    5,001 comments
    San Jose, CA

    20   4:51pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    MershedPerturders says

    who are we !@#$ing kidding here?

    our economy HAS GONE TO SHIT.

    the businesses can't hire anyone because the taxes are so !@#$ing high.

    No, they WON'T hire people unless there is a need. In some cases the "need" is to perpetuate the illusion of growth, or to perpetuate the illusion of an employee shortage to influence immigration policy. Hell maybe rejecting qualified applicants is a way to grind down the unemployed to accept a lower wage.

    I many cases there is NO need to hire anyone, a contractor will do.

  21. MershedPerturders


    Follow
    Befriend (1)
    21 threads
    493 comments

    21   5:02pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (5)   Dislike  

    there's no need for ANY OF THIS SHIT AT ALL.

    American living standards are about giving half-dead boomers a sense of personal accomplishment at the expense of just about everything else.

  22. mell


    Follow
    Befriend (7)
    255 threads
    3,075 comments
    San Francisco, CA

    22   6:10pm Sun 13 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    MershedPerturders says

    there's no need for ANY OF THIS SHIT AT ALL.

    American living standards are about giving half-dead boomers a sense of personal accomplishment at the expense of just about everything else.

    Thanks for telling it like it is. But you will be soon labelled as someone who wants old people to die in the streets.

  23. Patrick


    Follow
    Befriend (55)
    5,610 threads
    6,305 comments
    male
    Menlo Park, CA

    23   7:26am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike (1)  

    MershedPerturders says

    the businesses can't hire anyone because the taxes are so !@#$ing high.

    It's not our taxes. It's our health care costs, which are by far the highest in the world.

    And health care costs are high because our campaign finance system is broken. For example, in California the insurers successfully blocked an attempt to give the state insurance commissioner the power to say no to excessive premium hikes.

    The insurers did it by bribing state legislators with campaign "donations". I confirmed this in a chat with my state rep.

    Nothing will get fixed until corporations are barred from bribing politicians.

  24. lostand confused


    Follow
    Befriend (9)
    325 threads
    2,448 comments

    24   7:37am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    underwaterman says

    I don't know if you've worked recently in high tech but they started taking
    away offices about 7 years ago and have continued to save on the real estate
    cost per employee by stuffing them like mice into an even smaller box. HP did
    started at the Cupertino site in 2007 and Cisco just finished their real estate
    compression and now sit at open tables like you see at these startups all the
    time. Someone got the great idea awhile ago that they could save real estate
    cost and get rid of cubicles altogether. People I know at Cisco and HP hate the
    open space concept and hate working in it.

    Haha-I am amused by this new trend. My old compnay that I worked for , before being offshored has adopted this trend too. They are not an IT company-just a company that uses IT to run the business. But some doofus consultant sold them this "trend" and now they removed all cubicles and it is first come first serve. You rush in and grab the first seat available and even the managers don't have offices!!

    Soon they will all treat us like school kids.

  25. zzyzzx


    Follow
    Befriend (10)
    677 threads
    5,947 comments
    Baltimore, MD

    25   7:49am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)  

    Patrick says

    * Say exactly where the job is within the job listing itself. It is amazing but true that job listings frequently don't even say what city the job is in. Even "San Francisco" is not specific enough. Give an address.

    Around here some only give a state name, if even that,

  26. bdrasin


    Follow
    Befriend
    7 threads
    550 comments
    Alameda, CA

    26   9:47am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    Where I work HR requires a job application; we don't have a choice. We do our own hiring though, and just have any successful candidates fill the application out along with the rest of the HR paperwork. So far we've been able to get away with it...

  27. CMY


    Follow
    Befriend
    145 comments
    Compton, CA

    27   11:40am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike  

    Ironically, as I was reading this a recruiter got back to me.. with a 20 question test. Gahhhh...

  28. mell


    Follow
    Befriend (7)
    255 threads
    3,075 comments
    San Francisco, CA

    28   11:48am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    CMY says

    Ironically, as I was reading this a recruiter got back to me.. with a 20 question test. Gahhhh...

    You're applying at Initech?

  29. Blurtman


    Follow
    Befriend
    151 threads
    1,105 comments

    29   11:57am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    This is exactly why companies are floundering. HR folks, because they have no depth of knowledge about the company's technology, nor what it takes to keep it successful, can only evaluate form over substance. Having these folks in charge of screening candidates is a nightmare scenario, like having a blind person defuse a bomb.

  30. CMY


    Follow
    Befriend
    145 comments
    Compton, CA

    30   11:58am Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike  

    mell says

    You're applying at Initech?

    Judging from some of the reviews I've seen on Glassdoor.com, it might as well be.

    I'm uniquely qualified for this position, so I figured it was worth a shot. We'll see.

  31. leo707


    Follow
    Befriend (12)
    11 threads
    4,088 comments
    Oakland, CA
    leo707's website

    31   12:03pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (1)   Dislike  

    Patrick says

    * Do not skimp on lunch during the interview. If the applicant is going to be there at lunchtime, make sure it's high-quality. Applicants know that the company probably is not going to treat them any better as an employee later, so a dismal or non-existent lunch will be perceived as a bad sign.

    Ah, yes...years ago I worked for a company that provided free food in the break-room (frozen entrees, drinks, snacks, etc.), and was slightly horrified when I saw a hiring manager was "treating" an applicant to a frozen microwavable lunch. I never did see that applicant again...

  32. CMY


    Follow
    Befriend
    145 comments
    Compton, CA

    32   1:33pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    Might as well do this in real time- that test was a joke.

    Not because it was easy, but because it was likely written by the Dev team (but used for a Project Management position).

    I also checked some similar positions at this company and they mentioned all of the terms/requirements that weren't in the ad I responded to. I basically sent them a follow-up letter stating as much, and thanking them for the opportunity. I'm not going to twist myself into knots if they can't get their recruitment process together.

  33. Patrick


    Follow
    Befriend (55)
    5,610 threads
    6,305 comments
    male
    Menlo Park, CA

    33   6:08pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike (1)  

    bdrasin says

    Where I work HR requires a job application; we don't have a choice. We do our own hiring though, and just have any successful candidates fill the application out along with the rest of the HR paperwork. So far we've been able to get away with it...

    Making the candidate copy info from his resume to some application is an insult illustrating just how little the company cares about the candidate's time.

    It is never legally necessary. If you need data entry, hire data entry clerks. Maybe it's not HR's choice, but HR could point out to the executives that the application process is pissing people off. Every day. All day long.

  34. CMY


    Follow
    Befriend
    145 comments
    Compton, CA

    34   7:35pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    Patrick says

    Making the candidate copy info from his resume to some application is an insult illustrating just how little the company cares about the candidate's time.

    Since it's my field, I created a four-page website that is an easy-to-digest summary of where I've been and what my focus is. I have a conventional resume (page) but I agree it's maddening to go through that time and time again.

    I don't understand how anyone with an open creative position doesn't allow for some coloring outside the lines.

  35. APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch


    Follow
    Befriend (27)
    311 threads
    8,558 comments

    35   7:48pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (5)   Dislike  

    I never get past the part of the interview where I give them the opportunity to blow me to convince me that I should work for them.

  36. JodyChunder


    Follow
    Befriend (2)
    32 threads
    1,776 comments
    Victorville, CA

    36   9:07pm Mon 14 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

    HR = Hardly Relevant.

    Interviews at my Tutti Frutti take five minutes. If you've got a sense of humor and a strong profile, we're good.

  37. jimbancroft01


    Follow
    Befriend
    1 comments

    37   10:36am Tue 15 Jan 2013   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like (2)   Dislike  

    Here's a good one. I interviewed at a place where the VP was reading his phone during the interview. He gave me an N-Queens / chessboard question I was completely unprepared for, regarding optimal moves that a knight can take...something like that.

    I don't play chess, so that was strike 1 and 2. I struggled along, mentioned something about Prim and Dijkstra's algorithms and scribbled something out. When I could get him to look up from his iPhone he nodded, and started sketching out his own solution. It was obvious he also had no idea how to solve the question he'd asked.

    At the end, after he put down the chalk, he said --I'll never forget this-- that his solution was big-Oh of either nlogn or n-squared, which is like a weatherman claiming it's going to be sunny or a 120 mph hurricane the next day. This is what CS interviewing is like all too often these days.

Patrick is moderator of this thread.

Email

Username

Watch comments by email
Home   Tips and Tricks   Questions or suggestions? Mail p@patrick.net   Thank you for your kind donations

Page took 199 milliseconds to create.