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  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Artisans will rise.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    New Renter says

    Peter P says

    Yeah. That skill is even harder to come by. Worse yet, some promising prop traders are false prophets who end up losing big.

    maybe because that profession rewards bullshit more than facts.

    No, that's my job. I'm the professional BS artist.

    I was about to say something about the sell-side. But I didn't want to hurt your feelings. Oh well. ;-)

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Are you guys a mostly quantitative firm?

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    New Renter says

    Peter P says

    Yeah. That skill is even harder to come by. Worse yet, some promising prop traders are false prophets who end up losing big.

    maybe because that profession rewards bullshit more than facts.

    No, P&L is very real.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    New Renter says

    So far all I have heard from you people is of a shortage of exceptional (competent) programmers in the SFBA

    BTW, there is a shortage of exceptional prop traders in finance.

    And the reason for that is they're already millionaires and thus, demand more of the firm's bonuses than anyone else.

    If anything, you want to be that *unicorn*.

    Yeah. That skill is even harder to come by. Worse yet, some promising prop traders are false prophets who end up losing big.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    New Renter says

    Then there is no STEM shortage, there is just a shortage of exceptional, highly specialized programmers.

    Trust me, companies want exceptional generalists instead.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Why are people so willing to forgo their passion and whore their way to financial slavery?

    There ought to be a way to better exploit them.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Dan8267 says

    Software development is like the Olympics. You have to start when you are young in order to compete.

    Not necessarily young but everything must click. It is like golf. But I know people who went from beginner to scratch in two years.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    curious2 says

    I read comments from executives complaining that they can't find employees with the precise training they are looking for, and that the company is not in the education business.

    Again, it is hard to find semi-decent programmers even if you are not looking for a precise skill set. A scary number of candidates cannot even write simple programs on the whiteboard.

    Too many STEM students picked their majors because of salary expectations. I am sorry but most of them are crap.

    An passionate English major will do better in life than a tiger-parented engineer.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    Peter P says

    Heuristics can work for a while, but they entail assumptions that are bound to be in flux.

    That's the thing, it is in flux and that's what makes for a great career in development and analysis. Engineers should definitely be paid as well as doctors.

    I agree. I am all for importing foreign doctors and create a multi-tier healthcare system.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Portal says

    They cannot quit when they are told to work 24 hours straight because if they do they will revoke their visa.

    There are always weak minds. I have friends who work long hours because they are "on a mission" to develop something cool and groundbreaking. Whatever.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    If one's a dickweed boss, which many are, the locals can jump ship but stay in the country.

    In reality, the distinction is less dramatic. Even locals have egos to satisfy. An attack to their worth is no more benign than an attack to their ability to stay n the country. Both are irrational, IMO.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    The idea is that one is trained to think in terms of being open minded, while technical, in solving problems.

    Perhaps, but software is rather ill-defined to be classified as "solvable" problems. It is too much of a moving target. One can approach it like a math puzzle, but any kind of rigid analysis will be futile. Heuristics can work for a while, but they entail assumptions that are bound to be in flux.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    A way to do this, w/o mass defection/turnover, is to hire H1-Bs who'll do as they're told.

    Most workers do as they are told anyway. Moreover, a true leader gives his minions the illusion of self-control. Imports are not necessarily easier to "charm" than locals.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    HydroCabron says

    Why are they using H1B's to replace even the mediocre programmers, then? I don't get it.

    Why not just screen for the unicorns, and ship them over?

    It is easier to find unicorns if you look at more horses. Many horses will never become unicorns no matter how you raise them.

    Sometimes it is just hard to screen candidates before they are hired.

    Besides, why should the government interfere in the hiring process?

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    Isn't becoming a "great" programmer, similar to what's described above, a person with a technical background, who's willing to hone his concentration into a single point of focus for lengthy periods of time?

    Except that software is a left AND right brain exercise. It is just as qualitative as it is quantitative.

    A Computer Science degree is not even required. A Math (pure or applied) degree works just fine. No matter how they try to spin it, but software is NOT engineering.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Portal says

    STEM folk can't find jobs because Bill Gates and other billionaires are lobbying to import hundreds of thousands of H1Bs.

    That is a myth. Good programmers are as rare as unicorns in the Bay Area. To protect the future of the software industry, it is foolish to further reduce the pool of candidates.

    If talents cannot be sourced locally, companies will have no choice but to move overseas. The Bay Area will turn into another Rust Belt.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in Shooting Uzi was high on 8 year old's bucket list, Peter P said:

    I would have preferred Uni when I was 8. People need to eat more sushi.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    F# is an amazing language. I wrote a Self-Organizing Map with graphics in 40 lines of code.

    Better yet, the "pipe" operator eliminates the need for having many temp variables. Nulls are further discouraged, though still available for legacy/compatibility with .NET. Real tail-call optimizations. Very similar syntax/concept to ML/OCaml.

    I think concurrency is handled better in Scala though.

    I hate duck-typing of any shape or form. And I am saying this as a postmodernist.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    mell says

    Peter P says

    mell says

    Agreed. Although it pains me a bit to write Javascript jon the back-end just because node.js (no doubt a good framework for smaller projects) has become hotter than J-LO ;)

    To me, any large-scale project that uses a non-typed language or tool is suspicious.

    People have forgotten how much a well-designed type system can help with code quality and maintainability.

    Agreed. My favorites are currently Scala (though Java 8 looks pretty pretty good) and Groovy. Groovy is prob. one of the most concise languages that allows duck typing as well as strict type checking where necessary, and it has a lot of functional plus all the OO goodness.

    I have done Groovy/Grails quite a bit back in 2008. I liked it better than Ruby/Rails.

    What is great about Scala is strict-typing as well as type inference. The code can be concise and precise. It is the ULTIMATE OO language, yet with the expressiveness of a functional language.

    Three gripes: lack of TCO, calls are not curried by default, nulls are still prevalent

    As far as the language is concerned, I think F# is superior. However, I do prefer JVM over .NET.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Rin says

    Peter P says

    they should have gotten a degree in Women Studies. At least they would have more realistic imaginary girlfriends in their minds.

    Women studies is the den for Femi-Nazis. Even if they're attractive, you never know when they'll bite.

    What you're talking about is English Lit. Now there ... you get some cuties with fashionable outfits, kinda like the Bronte sisters.

    You are right! Creative writing is a much better bet.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    Training in abstract mathematics is the most underrated thing in computer science.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    drew_eckhardt says

    In a world where graduates can't write one 15 line function which handles corner cases B+ trees are completely out of the question.

    Then I guess they also can't write a one-line C function to compare strings.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    mell says

    Agreed. Although it pains me a bit to write Javascript jon the back-end just because node.js (no doubt a good framework for smaller projects) has become hotter than J-LO ;)

    To me, any large-scale project that uses a non-typed language or tool is suspicious.

    People have forgotten how much a well-designed type system can help with code quality and maintainability.

  • On 28 Aug 2014 in STEM graduate says he can't find a job, Peter P said:

    drew_eckhardt says

    Unfortunately not everyone has the aptitude to succeed in such environments - supposedly 1/3 of our data structures class failed which would imply finding another major and a drop in department revenues. Joel Spolsky observed a 40-70% washout rate in another appropriately rigorous program.

    In our compiler class, only one person finished the project.

    1/3 failed data structures? What's the matter with them? Many students had issues with classes like formal methods and computational theories. Those are excellent mind exercises IMO.

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