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  • On 23 Apr 2014 in Which of the following cities are best to live/work in?, dublin hillz said:

    For living, I would rank as follows:

    1) Dublin - lots of wide open space, new everything - real estate, parks.

    2) Fremont - slight edge over walnut creek, namely lake liz, mission peaks

    3) Walnut Creek

    4) Daly City - nearby ocean, calm suburb feel yet close to SF

    5) San Rafael - close to st quentin, cancer rates high in marin

    6) SF - too expensive, no parking

    7) Oaktown - even safe areas are within arms length of "thugs" lol

  • On 23 Apr 2014 in Actually Fixing Our Economy, dublin hillz said:

    Reality says

    Don't you think the people investing in RE at that time were in reality
    speculating on future RE value?

    Yes, they were in fact some of them tried to get the money back that they lost in previous speculation in dot com bust of 2000 when they went all in on companies that had no earnings. Both examples are antithesis of disciplined investing that manifests itself via appropriate asset allocation based on time horizon.

  • On 23 Apr 2014 in Should I buy a house here in San Francisco?, dublin hillz said:

    Even at 1.2 mil, you are looking at over 22 annual rents. Don't ever buy primary residence if it's over 20 annual rents. Personally, I would get the hell out of there because paying 54Gs a year in rent is colossal expenditure, but if you insist on staying in marina, I would continue to rent.

  • On 23 Apr 2014 in Actually Fixing Our Economy, dublin hillz said:

    Reality says

    It is crucial that they paint a line between investing vs. speculation in order
    for people to part with their money. In reality, there is no clear difference
    between the speculation vs. investing (which is speculating on asset growth and
    returns). People understood that before the invention of 401k corralling
    people's money into trust funds for Wall Street banksters, and probably soon
    that of the treasury.

    There's plenty of research out there that indicates that in the long term stocks beat bonds and cash while bonds beat cash. This is not "brainwashing" by wall st, it is a documented fact. So if someone is in it for 5+ years, then they are not speculating but investing based on historical evidence. What is brainwashing however is the gold cult that is spearheaded by charlatans on AM radio who have convinced their followers that gold is a natural inflation hedge and that inflation will occur based on "government deficits." Talk about "speculation"! They have indeed brainwashed their listener "masses" to "part with their money" and the gold is now 33% below the peak. Many of these people probably went all in to follow the "advice" of their sage idols. If they would have listened to "brainwashers" of wall st and their recommended advice of not having gold be over 5% of their portfolio they would have been in much better shape today. Will they repent and look in the mirror? Probably not.

  • On 22 Apr 2014 in Actually Fixing Our Economy, dublin hillz said:

    When I think of word "speculation" to me it means basically gambling. So for example, going all in on a company stock of a recent start up or going all in on a fund that's full of companies that have not shown any profit is "speculation." Investing on the other hand means to me accepting some risk and designing portfolio based on funds and companies within funds that have been around for a while where the fund performance can be judged relative to an index for a number of years. Also investing can be investing in an index fund itself. It essentially means accepting a reasonable level of risk inherent in a portfolio design and believing based on precedent that portfolio will outperform keeping that same amount of money in savings or CDs over an X number of years. Additionally, careful investors will dollar cost average to lessen the risk of going all in at the top which is something that people automatically do through their 401Ks. So, speculators are more like gamblers who bet in a sports book or blackjack while investrors have history and data on their side in their decision making process.

  • On 21 Apr 2014 in Why Are You Charging On Credit Cards Again?, dublin hillz said:

    errc says

    zzyzzx says



    errc says



    Why do you assume they are morons?


    Because they are voluntarily paying extra on every purchase they make with their cards.


    Not if they are taking the borrowed money, and investing it at greater returns.

    Lol, credit cards annual interest rates on average are double the stock market performance. That strategy is a sure path to eventual bankruptcy.

  • On 21 Apr 2014 in Rush in Ruins?, dublin hillz said:

    I think Rush is an absolute moron with no self control - what kind of dumbass manages to get fired from espn nfl gameday show 1 week in because they lack elementary level of self control to not make QB performance a racial issue?

  • On 21 Apr 2014 in The Alienation of Work, dublin hillz said:

    Indiana Jones says

    Non-Capitalism does not = Soviet Union

    OK, you can say that just like some people will claim that united states is not "real capitalism." The fact remains that soviet union was the most powerful communist empire that ever existed and united states remain the most powerful capitalist nation.

    Lenin as a matter of fact was influenced by writings of marx and engels to a great deal. The name USSR stood for united soviet socialist republics and the one and only party that existed in society was the communist party. Lenin/stalin have actively tried to bring communist theory to fruition depsite the fact that their apologists try to cover up for them and say that they were practicing "state capitalism" or whatnot.

    If that form society is not to your liking, then perhaps you may want something else. In which case reading Marx is probably not the way to go to realize your vision.

    Also, united states is the most individualistic society in the world. To bring a communal lifestyle here will be extremely challening due to this cultural variable. It's very important to understand local cultures when bringing about change. Look how well the "bring democracy to iraq" project has worked out.

    The closest that you can probably come to realizing the "commune lifestyle" would be to buy a mcmansion with a few families and how that every one cooperates. Easier said that done when people cross the age of 30 though.

  • On 21 Apr 2014 in Why Are You Charging On Credit Cards Again?, dublin hillz said:

    I have not paid a single cent of interest in my life to credit card companies. Pay off balance in full every month. Get 1% back in cash outs when I choose to do that. Unfortunately even with all that, I feel that merchants raise prices because the fact that people are willing to use credit cards artificially increases the affordability matrix of customers. I believe that for example if restaurants would not accept credit cards that going out to eat would be at least 20% cheaper. So even if someone pays off their balance in full every month, there are still certain unavoidable costs that are baked into the price. The ultimate problem is the id-oriented hedonistic "customer" who is either unwilling to accept the reality of what they can/cannot afford or is unwilling to delay gratification.

  • On 18 Apr 2014 in The Alienation of Work, dublin hillz said:

    The alienation present in the soviet union was actually very monstrous - waiting for hours in line to buy chicken and then all of a sudden being turned back when supplies ran out. Different than just going to an american supermarket and loading up your cart. Think you could just buy an aeroflot flight ticket as you could on expedia? Not a chance, unless you have a hookup in the right department. No wonder alcoholism was so high in soviet union, the iron curtain was quite a cross to bear....

  • On 18 Apr 2014 in Basketball Commissioner Says NBA is "Too Black.", dublin hillz said:

    If a bunch of crackas and wiggas were to play in the nba, the product would become unwatchable.

  • On 18 Apr 2014 in Five groups that lie about the housing market, dublin hillz said:

    I think that people made 2 major errors:

    1) Believing that "rental parity" would automatically mean that house prices would go down. Not many considered rents going up to achieve "parity."

    2) Fear of down payment loss aka vaporization. But they didn't look at other side of the coin - house prices going up which causes future income to be "vaporized" due to continuing to rent and then buying at a higher price.

  • On 18 Apr 2014 in It's not the fed, dublin hillz said:

    If a fugitive is hiding in a cave, special ops procedure may involve throwing gas inside the cave in order to cause the fugitive to come out of the cave so that they may be captured. By ZIPR and QE that's what the Fed essentially done to those who wanted to remain in cash, they "encouraged" them to invest in riskier assets and they certainly did, perhaps obviously not all, but enough of them. To what extent the current total value of major indexes is due to this effect, I cannot say, but I would not be at all surprised if 20%-30% of total current value is due to QE/ZIRP. Hey, I am not complaining, my 401K is doing great and the value of my home is way higher than when I bought, but it is what it is.

  • On 17 Apr 2014 in Why aren't ACA premiums tax deductible?, dublin hillz said:

    The whole notion that ACA will liberate the individual citizens from "shackles" of corporate workworld does not pass the test of evidence or logic. In the "individual marketplace" comparable plans are hunderds dollars per month more expensive for individual or family compared to what the employee would pay while working for a fortune 500 company. There's no way that a private individual can compete with economies of scale inherent in a group plan that's provided by a solid company.

  • On 17 Apr 2014 in Only international pressure will force Israel to make peace, dublin hillz said:

    Muslim idea of friday night fun - go to the gym and explode....

  • On 17 Apr 2014 in Tell me anything that you hate about Republicans the most., dublin hillz said:

    The co-opting of christians for the benefit of wealthy elites technically should never work as jesus had absolutely no love for the connected wealthy and money changers. In the end, it cost him his life. He did mention something to the effect how it will be easier to fit camel through the eye of the needle than for a rich person to get into heaven. Now we can debate literal/symbolic meaning of this, but it's nonetheless ironic how christianity has been coopted by the wealthy elites in united states to completely invert the message. But then again, so has buddhism with concepts of "mindfulness, paying attentiong and being present in the moment."

  • On 17 Apr 2014 in Tell me anything that you hate about Republicans the most., dublin hillz said:

    marcus says

    As far as I can tell, the only purpose of the social issues is to get the
    Christianists on board so that they stand a chance of winning elections.


    Chalk it up to demographics ?

    Yup, that's the strategy, but even that strategy has not worked in the last 2 general elections.

  • On 17 Apr 2014 in Majority of workers feel they are overweight, dublin hillz said:

    turtledove says

    errc says



    All thanks to the Food Pyramid, suggesting people eat all that sugar and grains. 12 servings of breads and cereals, what exactly did they think would happen? That people would be so malnourished from a diet centered around toxins and carbohydrates, would wind up with people needing so much healthcare that the gov could end up forcing everyone to buy private health insurance from evil corporations?


    What about calorie consumption vs. expenditure?

    That's by far the most imprortant variable for weight loss/gain/maintenance.

  • On 16 Apr 2014 in Tell me anything that you hate about Republicans the most., dublin hillz said:

    The fact that a woman can "decide" what to do with her fetus and treat it like a part of her body with no independent autonomy is a conspiracy forced upon our nation by orthodox jews who believe that a child is automatically a jew if born to a jewish mother. This was done as an affront to the good ol' patriarchy when in the times of the Romans the male elder could sentence anyone "alive" in the family to death for disobedience. Couldn't the orthodoxes get over the diaspora by now and move on?

  • On 15 Apr 2014 in Evictions from rent controlled apts in LA surging, dublin hillz said:

    There's "shadow inventory" in the rental market as well known as the max capacity that landlords can fill. In SFBA, I believe that max is 2 per bedroom +1 in the living room which means that max capacity for example is 3 people in 1BD, 5 people in 2bd, etc. My guess is that LLs will be filling this capacity and its gonna get really ugly once it's filled up due to rarity of new construction.

  • On 15 Apr 2014 in Is this Romney's 47%?, dublin hillz said:

    True moochers are 18% - http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/politics/story/2012/09/18/who-are-the-47/57802074/1

  • On 15 Apr 2014 in Is this Romney's 47%?, dublin hillz said:

    It's the fault of the roman dogs and their lackeys from the biblical times. They set a precedent for this!

  • On 15 Apr 2014 in The rent is too high in every city in America, dublin hillz said:

    edvard2 says

    dublin hillz says



    You must admit that rising salaries/compensation does result in higher cost of living especially in societies where people tend to "live for today" and saving is not inherently present. Look how well compensated employees in SFBA drove up the cost of housing both on rent and buy side.


    I totally agree. I mean- look at how well everyone in some of those 3rd world countries making $1 a day do. We should all be inspired to aim for that level. Paying people more is the real problem here. Like I said- pay people a lot less and we'll all be so much better off.

    Over in 3rd world hellholes, the problem is different - when 80% or so are making basically nothing, they effectively can't compete against each other so the power resides purely with the entrenched generational aristocrats. Over here where the variability of incomes is high, the pressure is to live as well as possible even if it means going above your means and stretching your budget to the moon to show that you have "made it". Which means that access to money/options will result in prices being bid up. Additionally in places like SFBA, a region that is well coveted, there is often migration inflow on both upper end and lower end of income scale. With new development opportunities in RE being rather limited, a population inflow will result in higher buy/rent regardless of which income scale will inflow. If it's the rich gliterrati, it will result in nice "trickle down" form of price increases where they displace who was there previously while the latter will do the same thing to those below them and so forth. On the other hand if it's going be mostly the poor moving in, well unless they are gonna be homeless, they have to "live somewhere" so the LLs are gonna assume that they will double up and live a good old communal apartment soviet lifestyle. Which will also result in prices going up via people living like sardines.

  • On 15 Apr 2014 in The rent is too high in every city in America, dublin hillz said:

    edvard2 says

    errc says



    Yes indeed, the economic rent is too damned high in Everywhere, America. Do not fret. The statists are pushing for higher minimum wages so that the landlords can raise the rents, and forcing everyone to purchase health insurance, so everything will be better. I mean, come on! Look at my 401k! Bazinga


    Oh that makes soooo much sense. You know what the problem is? Those folks flippin' burgers make too much money. If everyone got paid less then they would have less money to spend and so all the people who sell stuff would have to lower their prices and cut employees and make less money. That's the real answer: don't aim high, aim low so that everyone can come closer due to everyone becoming equally poor. Great plan.

    You must admit that rising salaries/compensation does result in higher cost of living especially in societies where people tend to "live for today" and saving is not inherently present. Look how well compensated employees in SFBA drove up the cost of housing both on rent and buy side.

  • On 14 Apr 2014 in The rent is too high in every city in America, dublin hillz said:

    No worries, they will still spend $10.50 on a beer at a ballpark and stimulate the economy...

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