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  • On 21 Oct 2014 in The 2014 housing market and my prediction for 2015, New Renter said:

    Robber Baron Elite Scum says

    Of course. The last imbecile I want wiping my asshole is an unrefined, unsophisticated and commoner type.

    I need my asshole wiped for me in the most elegant way possible.

    You are looking for a Groom of the Stool:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groom_of_the_Stool

    This was one of the most coveted positions in the royal courts of old.

    Robber Baron Elite Scum says

    Staff is code word for disposable human waste. We just need a robot that can do everything and anything we ask.

    We don't care for it's feelings or their real nature. They don't get to choose what they are, we mold them into whatever we want...

    Even if it means using "it" as a butler, chauffeur, chef, pianist, violinist, masseuse, bodyguard, personal assistant and as a torture experimental subject.

    You will quickly become bored "torturing" something that feels no real pain.

    If that's your thing why not just buy yourself a part time high ranking military commission, travel to Guantanamo and torture er, enhanced interrogate along with the real professionals?

  • On 21 Oct 2014 in Where Do You Peasants Bank? Credit Unions? Hahaha, New Renter said:

    Rin says

    Quick question ... why is someone parking $1M in a loser bank, everyone knows about BoA, esp when his FDIC insurance is capped at $250K?

    At most, he should have $300K, out of that pile, parked in three different commercial banks (checking/CDs) and then, have $700K split between two brokerage accounts offering SIPC protection up to for $500K per account holder.

    Those brokerage accounts should be fully vested in high dividend utility/tobacco/alcohol stocks, earning him 4-5% per year. If he wanted to re-invest he can, or simply take the dividends ($30K-$32K/yr) and use 'em to pay his bills.

    That $250k is per beneficiary - The acct holder can put his/her spouse/BFF/cat or dog on the account as beneficiaries and get $250k per head.

    http://www.cbsjbank.com/PR093.pdf

  • On 21 Oct 2014 in How tech jobs, housing and transit are shaping a megaregion, New Renter said:

    Heraclitusstudent says

    Companies need to open locations outside of the peninsula.

    And develop proper work-from-home options.

  • On 19 Oct 2014 in Desalinization: A permanent solution to CA water problem, New Renter said:

    Quigley says

    You can use solar energy directly to produce fresh water. Just build an Oceanside dome of clear plastic and pump in seawater to cover the floor. Sun evaporates the water which condenses on the dome and runs down the sides to collection basins. It would be land intensive and not very fast tho. But you could use undesirable land for it.

    I've posted here on PatNEt extensively on this very subject. RO desalination is a terrible solution. It consumes far too much energy and can only purify 50% of the input water, the rest leaqves far saltier than it entered. This isn't so important for plants with ocean access but for inland plants this is a big problem.

    There is a company - WaterFX (And no, I have no affiliation with them) - which has developed a solar desalination method using mineral oil as the heat reservoir.

    http://waterfx.co/

    This allows the plant to operate even at night and cloudy days (provided not too many cloudy days in a row). It also purifies 93%+ of the input water, is modular, can be constructed quickly, and is FAR cheaper to build and operate than plants such as the one in Carlsbad.

    Note that the Carlsbad plant was begun in the mid 1990's drought and abandoned when the rains returned. This is the problem with desalination plants they are the hot ticket when water is scarce and abandoned when water is plentiful. Unfortunalty they are also damned expensive and the bills continue even when there is no need for the extra water.

    There is also the problem of logisitics. Agriculture uses 80% of the state's water, NOT coastal cities. Desalination plants need to be located inland, not on the coasts.

    To summarize, RO desalination plants are expensive, use tremendous amounts of high value electricity, are inefficent at making fresh water, and take forever to construct, are not modular, and have a large footprint in valuable coastal areas.

    Solar Desalination plants are far less expensive, use little high value electricity, are highly efficient at creating fresh water, are modular, and have a large footprint in low cost inland areas.

    I 'd go with solar. By far.

  • On 19 Oct 2014 in The United States Is Number One ... but in What?, New Renter said:

    STEM shortageOilwelldoctor says

    The United States Is Number One ... but in What?

    Denial

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    indigenous says

    New Renter says

    Oh don't worry, its not just IWOG.

    That is a relief, it goes without saying or Iwog's ilk, of course I have to explain that to you...

    I see you've been taking grammar lessons from the Captain again.

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    indigenous says

    iwog says

    You really are a loser on so many levels.

    Oh dear, Iwog thinks I'm a loser, I'm crushed.

    Oh don't worry, its not just IWOG.

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    indigenous says

    It did not hit the main stream, Ebola is an equal opportunity killer.

    I dunno, AIDS doesn't care who it affects. As far as epidemics go AIDS is far, far worse than ebola has ever been or is likely to get.

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in When Will ApocalypseFuck Finally Die?, New Renter said:

    Ceffer says

    Good luck with the phalanx of Gatlings.

    Its the claymores and punji pits you really need to watch for.

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in A non-compete clause for sandwich-makers? Something is wrong., New Renter said:

    Vicente says

    It would be so much easier for Job Creators, if we just went ahead and formally legalized slavery again.

    I don't see here a cost breakdown based on skills, so here's a chart I made for a class a few years ago:

    Average cost of a slave (of any age, sex, or condition) in 1850 = $ 400 ($11,300 in 2009 dollars)

    Average cost of a slave (of any age, sex, or condition) in 1860 = $ 800 (#21,300 in 2009 dollars)

    Cost of a prime field hand (18-30 year-old man) in 1850 = $ 1,200 ($34,000 in 2009 dollars)

    Cost of a skilled slave (e.g. a blacksmith) in 1850 = $ 2,000 ($56,700 in 2009 dollars)

    EDIT: Some have asked where these figures are from. They're data from the Texas State Historical Association and it's important to bear in mind that these values would vary state by state.

    http://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/1dp3cb/how_much_did_slaves_in_america_cost_in_todays/

    On top of that slaves will have to be fed, clothed and sheltered.

    Don't worry, there's a better way!

    Enter the unpaid internship:

    No pay (other than *work experience*) and all costs of living are offloaded to the intern in the forms of high interest loans and parental charity. As long as HR departments universally exclude the candidacy of anyone without extensive unpaid internships there will be a neverending line of slaves er bright young people willing to work for free.

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in Dallas Top Health Epidemiologist Being Monitored For Ebola, New Renter said:

    Strategist says

    They need a quick and effective cure


    vaccine.

    Vaccinate with a syringe loaded M134 and "cure" the corpses with a flamethrower.

    Works every time!

  • On 17 Oct 2014 in The Giants win the pennant!, New Renter said:

    iwog says

    New Renter says

    Who are the Giants and what's a pennant?

    Giants is yo daddy.

    Really? Would a family court judge accept that in a paternity case?

    If so I may just be able to buy your empire and then some with the couch change from my inheritance.

    Yay sperm lottery!

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in Interest Rates flirting close to sub 4% territory again..., New Renter said:

    iwog says

    New Renter says

    Would you recommend these as a safe place to park money now?

    For someone in California, yes. Tax benefits as well as monthly dividends and they earn a good return.

    I've had them in the trust I manage for at least a decade but this is the first time I've owned them.

    Watch out because the spread on these is pretty steep. They are also a lot more volatile than a bond fund has any right to be. I find the best way to buy them is to watch the relative price movements over the last week. If NAC is outperforming, buy NXC. If NXC is outperforming, buy NAC.

    Thanks for the advice - I'm taking my foyer into the investment world very slowly.

    Did you park all your cash in these guys or only a portion?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in Interest Rates flirting close to sub 4% territory again..., New Renter said:

    iwog says

    New Renter says

    Which bonds did you go with?

    Would you recommend these as a safe place to park money now?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in The Giants win the pennant!, New Renter said:

    Who are the Giants and what's a pennant?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in Lockheed claims nuclear fusion breakthrough., New Renter said:

    justme says

    There is no way one can get that much power passing out of such a small space without melting pretty much any material known to man.

    Extra and ultra high voltage power transmission lines pass more than 1.21 GW all day every day, over plain old steel re-enforced aluminum wire with a total cross section far less than this thing.

    turtledove says

    This is probably a really stupid question... Based on the responses, I think this is probably directed at Mark... If the goal were to power cars with this kind of thing, wouldn't every car accident be like dropping nuclear bombs on ourselves? At a minimum, radiation leaks?

    (See Dan, once again, I prove myself unworthy for NASA.)

    My father worked - briefly - on a nuclear powered bomber back in the 1960s. The project was similar to project Pluto:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Pluto

    The problem was the bomber was so heavy from all the shielding that it required a runway miles long, however it could stay aloft for years. The crew OTOH could not. This was well before eh era of drone tech.

    The other problem was the engines were so leaky the plane didn't even need to carry a payload, instead all it had to do was make a few passes over the target to render it too radioactive for human habitation.

    justme says

    those reactors are small scale and highly inefficient, not cost effective.

    Those are based on harnessing the heat generated by the radioactive materials via the Edison effect.

    No, not very efficient but damn reliable night and day.
    Heraclitusstudent says

    This doesn't happen with fusion, where you fuse small atoms.

    No the products are indeed radioactive but for a much shorter time.

    myob says

    Solar will only work for base load if one of two major problems is solved:

    1) Storage of electricity or solar energy so that it can be stored for night time.

    2) Long range transport of electricity, so we can ship it across time zones.

    It's wonderful for peak load during the day in sunny climates, though.

    1) Pumped hydroelectric storage can handle anything solar can put out and more. Response time to load demand can be very rapid too, although batteries may provide local instantaneous response more reliably.

    2) Texas is putting together such a grid for their wind power. HVDC will go a long way to solving that problem.

    No the problem with solar will be night, weather and super cheap natural gas.

    Rin says

    On the other hand, the Lockhead/UW idea is to use some aspect of the plasma's own field for self-containment. Sure, it may work up to 99.9% of the time, as expected in the theoretical models, however, what about that 0.1% time when a chaotic phase boundary gets hit and then perhaps, the magnetic fields de-polarize so all of the sudden, the entire plasma goes critical without an active shield in place? If this is the Univ of Washington then I won't be moving to Seattle.

    I'm sure that has been thought of. They will probably buffer the output through the mother of all battery/capacitor banks to ensure a steady supply of power to the containment field at least for the short time it's needed to prevent a catastrophe.

    indigenous says

    es but you are forgetting about the flux capacitor.

    This is the real flux capacitor:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    indigenous says

    New Renter says

    Meanwhile the presence of ebola in the US is still an unknown?

    Yes

    or the potential of

    By that reasoning AIDS was the "black swan" of the late 20th century! How much of an impact did it have on the economy?

    None, absolutely none.

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in Interest Rates flirting close to sub 4% territory again..., New Renter said:

    iwog says

    Heraclitusstudent says

    iwog says

    I've been long bonds since I sold all my stocks.

    Are you down on this one?

    Nope I'm up by a pretty good margin, not to mention the huge sum I saved by going to cash.

    Which bonds did you go with?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in A non-compete clause for sandwich-makers? Something is wrong., New Renter said:

    APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says

    If you've been in any chain sub shop they should be forcing the SLOPFUCKS! to sign non-jack-off-on, non-spit-on and non-jack-boogers-on sandwich making agreements.

    Well so much for the "secret" sauce.

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in Why are we punishing poor for not registering for the draft, New Renter said:

    APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says

    The draft should be replaced with a scalp bounty.

    Bring in the head of an ISISFUCK! and collect $30. Biker gangs would vacation in hotspots and the bounties would take care of the cost of the plane tickets.

    Win-win.

    But how do you know the head is genuine ISISFUCK and not an imitation?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    indigenous says

    New Renter says

    The California drought has a better chance of being a black swan than ebola.

    The state caused drought is known about, don't think so.

    Meanwhile the presence of ebola in the US is still an unknown?

  • On 16 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    mell says

    New Renter says

    For what its worth I also don't see how one, two or even a few hundred US based John and Jane Doe cases of Ebola would affect the stock market.

    Post hoc ergo propter hoc

    What? Whether you think it's hysteria or not, you are seeing first full hazmat-suited travelers popping up at airports, and you can bet that air travel is already down.

    If the post 911 TSA nonsense hasn't hurt air travel volume then an ebola outbreak certainly won't either.

    indigenous says

    But yes in my expert opinion Ebola could be a black swan. Not that it really is the cause of anything just the catalyst.

    The California drought has a better chance of being a black swan than ebola.

  • On 15 Oct 2014 in The implications of being right about stocks, New Renter said:

    iwog says

    mell says

    Prediction was good so far. But this is just wrong. I trade every morning and the minute the 2nd infection was announced the markets took a big dive, then again as the commercial air travel of that nurse the day before was announced. It has everything to do with ebola, and some other economic indicators that turned sour. If they limit air travel (which they should) it will be an even bigger impact on the economy.

    One trading day is going to be totally irrelevant in this correction. If you think this selloff was because of ebola fine, but you're wrong.

    For what its worth I also don't see how one, two or even a few hundred US based John and Jane Doe cases of Ebola would affect the stock market.

    Post hoc ergo propter hoc

  • On 14 Oct 2014 in If you're a real STEM person, think about the Navy Nuclear program, New Renter said:

    Rin says

    New Renter says

    Sure if you like working for the Dread Pirate Roberts:

    BTW, Rodents of Unusual Size do exists.

    Here's South America's Capybara ...

    I hear they are quite tasty to some:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/21/world/americas/21rodent.html?_r=0

  • On 14 Oct 2014 in OK you're driving down the street a dog runs out in front and you hit it., New Renter said:

    CaptainShuddup says

    But lately it seams every time a City has to use their search and rescue resources, they start immediately talking about reimbursement from those that they rescued. It's most always parlayed into the ending of the news report, about the lost hiker, stranded driver in the snow, mountain climbers ect...

    But a family dog lost and on the lose, well let's call out the whirly birds!

    Usually that's because the hikers did something idiotic like go off-trail despite numerous signs posted saying not to, ignore weather warnings, try to feed a bear doughnuts from their mouths, etc.

    Should the dog get on a freeway it not only will likely be killed it will cause a huge, potentially human fatal pileup, so yes calling out the whirlybirds for a loose dog isn't always a stupid idea.

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