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1   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (41)   2012 Aug 8, 2:50am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

And that's why housing prices are poised to 10x by 2013!

2   HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2012 Aug 8, 2:53am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I missed this link in the past. If the $20 Trill is close,it raises the same problem I've seen for years. The money doesn't exist so it will have to be created through debt. I'm wondering how that's worked in the past. Now I've got another problem, No Jobs-No Consumers.

3   anonymous   ignore (null)   2012 Aug 8, 3:03am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Hence our current bifurcated market,,,,and the divide widens

People with money, will bid up desirable areas

Undesirables (the poor) will be relegated to squatting in these deecaying shacks, reminiscing about the good old days when they had potable water and dumpsters to dive in to scrounge for spoiled food scraps, as they eat their mud pies and drink their own urine

At least they'll have free healthcare to cope with the return of any number of disease and viruses that are imminent in such poor living conditions

4   Tenpoundbass   ignore (14)   2012 Aug 8, 3:12am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

America has too many big houses – 40 million, to be exact
because consumers are shifting preferences to condos, apartments and small homes

Lemme guess the 40 million houses NOT in the progressive snow globe?

experts told the New Partners for Smart Growth Thursday

Chris Nelson, who heads the Metropolitan Research Center at the University of Utah, suggests a need for 10 million more attached homes and 30 million more small homes on 4,000-square-foot lots or less. By contrast, demand for large-lot homes is 40 million less than currently available. "Is it any wonder that suburban homes are plummeting in price, because there is far less demand of those homes than in the past," he said. – UT San Diego

Yeah that's the ticket we need more rental apartments or houses with yards the size of postage stamps.

I can't count the times people came over to my house, and called my 11,000 sqft lot an eyesore, or how many times the 2,100 sqft of living space has just gotten in my way.

Where do you people find this crap, who comes up with this stuff?

http://www.unews.utah.edu/old/p/070108-1.html
http://metroresearch.utah.edu/presentations
Oh fuck the chief architect of the Snow globe utopia that's who?
This shit bird was hawking this load of shit since 2008.

Nice try.

5   Dan8267   ignore (3)   2012 Aug 8, 3:53am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Strategic Renter says

Forty Million Houses in the US That No One Needs?

None of those houses are zombie proof. As such, no one will need those houses in the upcoming apocalypse.

6   drew_eckhardt   ignore (0)   2012 Aug 8, 4:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

CaptainShuddup says

Yeah that's the ticket we need more rental apartments or houses with yards the size of postage stamps.

People generally don't want to live in small homes, although they do want to live places where land prices in those locations dictate smaller accommodations for finite budgets. Housing is scarce enough in my neighborhood that one bedroom apartments rent for $2000 and 2 bedrooms $3000. More supply would make that better.

I can't count the times people came over to my house, and called my 11,000 sqft lot an eyesore, or how many times the 2,100 sqft of living space has just gotten in my way.

Lots of people want to live close to job centers where such homes are prohibitively expensive.

Assuming I'd yet to make my millions (a Redfin search returned one 2000+ square foot home on a 1/4 acre lot in my town listed for $1.6M) if I owned a 2000+ square foot house on a 1/4 acre lot I'd consider it a weekend getaway because during the week I'd be spending my non-working waking hours living in my car driving to and from it. Instead I take what I can get that's a comfortable bicycle commute to the north and south ends of Silicon Valley (1200 square feet inside and perhaps half that outside).

Lots of people want to live in more urban areas with the same affordability problem.

As a young single guy I chose to live within walking distance of night life - live music, fine dining, and bars. My daughter chooses to live down-town in a relatively affordable one-bedroom apartment because the suburbs are boring.

7   jhall   ignore (0)   2012 Aug 9, 1:53am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

From the story:
"Smart growth," loosely defined as nonsprawling developments that minimize distances, maximize public infrastructure investment returns and promote environmental sustainability, has been a buzzword in planning circles since the 1990s.

Me:
Here in Minneapolis, rental apartment buildings are going up all over the city. More folks are biking to work (even in winter!) and using mass transit. In our downtown, we have one new grocery store and a Whole Foods being built with "286 luxury apartments" on the upper seven floors. Over 30,000 residents now live downtown, including lots of empty nesters who moved in for the nightlife.

The theaters are packed at night, most main streets have bike lanes, food scene is booming. It's great to see Minneapolis thriving...

You can get a great deal on a 4,000-square-foot Tuscan villa in Woodbury...


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