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McTardMart Doomed; Hillbilly Retail Bedlam Makes Customers Barph and Run Away

By APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch following x   2013 Aug 15, 11:21pm 12,486 views   65 comments   watch   nsfw   quote     share    


This shithole is doomed.

I go in once every few years when an item I need for work, usually, is loss-leader priced below even online prices. It's always a monstrous horror, like going to an underworld of half-human freaks who've been lobomotized at birth and left to wander dementedly around these huge stores in blue vests.

Now appears the victims who staff these things have figured out that by accepting $4 a day and no benefits, they are regarded as a form of life lower than draft animals and have become enraged and murderously hostile toward the customers who they no doubt believe they're barbaric wanton scum.

Won't be long before customers report employees sitting in the toilets in the plumbing supplies department and smoking and shitting during store hours and associates are arrested for raping and cannibalizing customers.

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130816103530-284615-wal-mart-disappoints-wall-street-and-customers-alike?trk=tod-home-art-list-large_0

When I heard this announcement a quick search on the web revealed articles from Bloomberg.com that talk about the Wal-Mart customer experience, using real world examples. There were several stories from real shoppers that gave specific examples of what frustrated them about their experience. I was able to narrow down their complaints into 5 main areas.

Can’t get the items they want. Many shoppers complain that they go to Wal-Mart with a list but can’t get all the items they want on them. They leave with three of seven, or even worse, one of seven. Many of them complain that the store has empty shelves and spaces that will stay that way for a long time.
No one is there to help anymore. More than one of the shoppers said that they couldn’t find an employee to help them. I have experienced that many times.
Long checkout lines. Consumers from stores all across the country complained about check out times. The average amount of time was 15 minutes. One couple had a strategy where they would wait until right before they checked out, and then one of them would run to get the ice cream because otherwise it would melt in line! Lots of consumers say that they just abandon their purchases and walk out empty handed.
Unpleasant experience. It’s no surprise that many former Wal-Mart shoppers are willing to pay more money, drive further, and go to more than one store to avoid their local Wal-Mart store. When asked why they would do those things, they said that Wal-Mart was an unpleasant experience and it was preferable to go somewhere else.
Poor Customer Service: A lot of the consumers felt driven away by poor customer service. One man said he was told that he should get his watch battery changed at a pawnshop since no one there knew how to do it. Others describe asking a question about where to find something and the employee pointing vaguely, saying “go over there.” Again this has happened to me.

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26   Vicente   ignore (0)   2013 Aug 26, 1:26pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Dan8267 says

Selling for less than cost to run competition out of business is called price dumping and I believe it's illegal in most states.

You really think that is enforced? It would be difficult to prove without getting all UP IN the books. And we know the bigger/richer the corporation, the more likely the lawyers and accountants have money & means to prevent that.

27   Dan8267   ignore (3)   2013 Aug 26, 1:45pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Vicente says

You really think that is enforced?

No idea. I just said it was illegal most places.

I suppose it could be provable with large companies like Walmart, which are exactly the companies that would profit by doing it. But I'd suspect that our government would just slap Walmart's wrist at the most if it did catch that company or any large corporation price dumping.

28   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Aug 26, 9:09pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

freak80 says

Not a problem for Wal-Mart. They have enough money to buy the governments of most states.

....That's why you should invest in WMT. And the cigarette companies for that matter (PM, MO, etc)... You think the gubmint is gonna kill that golden goose that brings in all those taxes from the poor nicotene-addicted taxpayers?

29   freak80   ignore (4)   2013 Aug 27, 12:12am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

sbh says

Let the deep pockets have their way. I don't understand you. It's perfectly legal to sell at a loss. Why do you hate freedom?

;-)

30   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Aug 31, 11:48am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

When did Walmart begin the downward spiral? When the founder died, and the new management fired or drove to quitting the thousands of long time employees making teens per hour with benefits.

They pursued a policy of aggressive expansion that drove tons of local businesses out of business. Fine, competition.

But then, they ate themselves. The multiple checkout lines were useless, since they were only partially staffed. The stores fell apart, disorganized shelves, filthy floors, overworked, hateful staff - the only people who wanted to work at Walmart were those who had no choice.

The lack of substitutes in rural areas makes Walmart a mad house at certain times (like all weekend long).

Having cut the staff to the bone, even Forbes noticed that Walmart seems to be cutting store management, too:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/walterloeb/2013/07/17/why-are-walmart-stores-such-a-mess/

In the past few years, people started to get wise to Walmart's trickery. People now make sure there is no "W" at the end of a model identifier when comparing Walmart prices to competitors - although Walmart got wise to that and got manufacturers to drop any serial number ID for their inferior Wally Versions:

I wanted an inexpensive digital camera for my daughter. After finding one with the basic features I wanted, I went to sears, target and walmart to check prices. All 3 stores sold the a camera with the exact same model number. Sears -$119 target -$109 walmart - $99 . I bought it at the manufactures online store but when the camera was delivered it DID NOT have all the features that the Sears and Target salesperson had shown me (couldn’t get help at the Walmart store). I contacted the factory store and asked them if perhaps the one I got was an older version of this camera since the model number on the unit was the correct. The customer service agent apologized and said I must have gotten one of the “WALMART” cameras. These units were manufactured just for them with the same model number but with reduced features. So while the price was a little lower at walmart, the value was worse since it was a stripped down version.

http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/NussbaumOnDesign/archives/2007/02/can_this_be_true_of_wal-mart.html

TL;DR: They'll find the cheaper price is due to reduced features, not better prices than the competition.

31   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Sep 1, 9:45am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Oops, forgot a keypoint - thanks sbh for the sociopath analogy.

Walmart stores began cannibalizing sales from other Walmarts, too.

Wallyword is a dying business. Even with all the preferential local tax treatments (localities often got into bidding wars, making all other businesses pay full tax with old infrastructure, while promising Walmart no property taxes and improved infrastructure for car traffic), the full bore PR campaign, all the CATO and Heritage help, it got too greedy and pissed off the customer.

Increasingly, Wallyworld is getting the bottom rungs of consumers; whereas before they had a much more diverse (and profitable) customer base. With that bottom rung base comes more security problems, as well. Walmart Parking Lots are often huge black spots in otherwise crime free locales.

32   HydroCabron   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 1, 10:25am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Why did Walmart never sell real estate?

33   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 1, 11:40am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

Wallyword is a dying business.

Really? Their financials say otherwise. Are you also considering their business OUTSIDE the US? This is where they will find very good growth moving forward.

You may not like Walmart as a consumer, or for moral reasons; but you can't deny it as an investment juggernaut....

34   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 1, 11:43am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

When did Walmart begin the downward spiral?

If a company is in a downward spiral, why do they keep raising their dividends? One of the best dividend growth companies, and they are in a downward spiral? What am I missing?

35   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 2, 6:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

sbh says

AverageBear says

why do they keep raising their dividends?

Because, as with most publicly traded companies, the only thing that matters is the stock ownership. Wealth in America doesn't come from labor, it comes from ownership. That's been the case for a long time, so nobody is surprised. The hard part is watching the whole economy re-balance and retool around an impoverished population of mainstay consumers. We all know that a large component of their fate is their own responsibility, but it's like watching a slow moving train wreck as these new crap jobs flesh out the new crap business model of crap American wages.

SBH,

Sooooo, your argument has mutated into a broad rant about the macro economy, that has nothing to do w/ my original comment about Walmart being a in a downward spiral and its overall fiscal heath.

But you are correct in one aspect: as with most (ie, ALL) publicly traded companies, the only thing that matters (or more correctly, the first or most important thing) is making money. It's why they exist, and it's called self preservation.

Blaming one company (and its success) on our nation's 'crap' business model/wages/etc, is a pretty narrow view of things.

Walmart is one of the elite dividend payers in a sea of American companies. It helps retired folks (rich and poor, and every one inbetween) live better off the fixed income stream (dividends) that Walmart provides. Do you have a problem with this aspect of Walmart as well?

36   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 2, 9:49am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

SBH, OK, I wasn't sure were you were going on the topic: economy vs WMT vs capitalism. I see what you are saying about those that work and shop in Walmart, or really any retail chain for that matter.

Not to sound depressing, but working in retail is supposed to suck. It requires no skill, and pays the least. It should be a 'negative reinforcement' experience to get the hell outta there, and find better work, or work on improving your skillset to get that better job. And depressing as it is to go into a store (walmart or otherwise) and experience the lowered standards as time marches on, it is what it is. I'd like to think that there were the same zombie-like, unattentive,people in the 60s/70s/80s that worked in retail. Maybe we just put those bad retail experiences out of our minds over time? Maybe the retail experience is different by location?

Not to get too political, but our welfare 'goodie quotient' has expanded big time the last 20+ years (under BOTH parties), so the pool of hungry, motivated workers has shrunk or disappeared.

I'm going to teach my kids to attack each menial/shit job like his life depended on it. Make it a game to see how fast they can get out of it (via promotion or a bounce to a better job), within that company or somewhere else. I want them to experience that work as I did, and appreciate and use your skills to improve yourself, so that retail/shit work will be a faint memory in the rearview mirror.... Kinda goes against the grain of those fast-food workers that went on strike last week, eh?

One final note (and story)... I took my kids to McDonalds last Friday night (I know, unhealthy, blablabla; it's a treat I give them about 5-6 times a year)... Anyway, I had a tray of garbage I was trying to throw out, into the tiny-slotted garbage can. I spilled everything on the floor, even a good amount of milk left in a bottle. I cleaned it up, and got napkins to clean up the spilled milk. The cashier was nice, and told me that they'd clean it up, but i did it anyway, feeling bad about them cleaning my mess. I checked on my kids (5 and 8), then went back to get shakes. The cashier didn't charge me for mine (1 of the 3) because she saw that I cleaned my mess myself. She was pleasant when i picked up my food before my spaz event, and she was pleasant during, and after. I thought that was a cool move that I didn't even expect. Moral of story? Sometimes you'll find people that really care, or are nice in places you'd never expect (retail)....

37   FortWayne   ignore (4)   2013 Sep 13, 9:43am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Dan8267 says

FortWayne says

Walmart business plan is simple. Come into an area and dump products at break even or less until everyone around goes out of business.

Selling for less than cost to run competition out of business is called price dumping and I believe it's illegal in most states.

Legal or illegal, they do practice dumping cheap Chinese garbage all over the place until they run everyone out of town.

38   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Sep 16, 9:21am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

AverageBear says

Really? Their financials say otherwise. Are you also considering their business OUTSIDE the US? This is where they will find very good growth moving forward.

Rising dividends are par for the course for an established company; increasing dividends are closely correlated with reduced growth.

WMT stock is $5 (~$74) more than it was in 1999 (~$69). That was almost 15 years ago and adjusted for inflation, it's worth far less. To be on par with the 1999 price, WMT needs to be over $95, or the other way around, the current price of $74 was $59 in 1999.

By comparison, COSTCO is trading almost 3x what it was in 1999 in raw dollars, and has almost doubled after adjustments for inflation, during the same ~15 year period (~$50 to $113.00). COSTCO has also greatly increased their dividend from about 7 cents in 2004 to 31 cents today, a rapid increase over a shorter period of time (COSTCO didn't pay regular dividends prior to 2004)

39   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Sep 16, 9:41am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

sbh says

For so many Americans there is just no margin for random accident because the value of labor is so low and their ability to manage capital is so poor. So it's both their fault and the fault of a country that has changed from how it used to be.

We're pretty much the only industrialized country in the world where a brush with a terminal disease can make you lose everything you worked for, even if you have insurance.

40   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 16, 9:42am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

Really? Their financials say otherwise. Are you also considering their business OUTSIDE the US? This is where they will find very good growth moving forward.

ThunderLips,

The quote you took from me, was refuting the absurd notion that WMT is going down the shitter. It obviously isn't. Sooooo, to compare WMT's 'value' to Costco's value does what exactly? I was simply saying that Walmart is a GREAT company for the long-term investor, and is far from going down the toilet. I honestly don't know much about Costco, but from my very brief research, it seems like a solid company as well.

Comparing Costco to Walmart I think proves my point. Both are great companies. However, if you want to compare a long-term investment in both, you are still better off investing in Walmart compared to Costco. Costco's current 1.1% dividend yield will never catch up w/ WMT's 2.4%, even with rehtorical insane (read unsustainable) future dividend growth on Costco's part.... This article sheds some light on this...

http://seekingalpha.com/article/1273201-wal-mart-or-costco-for-dividends-a-long-term-look

41   AverageBear   ignore (2)   2013 Sep 16, 9:43am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Thunderlips.. I highlighted the wrong text.... I'm sure you figured that out..

42   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Sep 16, 1:57pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

AverageBear says

The quote you took from me, was refuting the absurd notion that WMT is going down the shitter. It obviously isn't. Sooooo, to compare WMT's 'value' to Costco's value does what exactly?

Right, I neglected to mention why I compared COSTO to WMT, and not Target or other big box stores. It's because COSTCO pays well above the minimum wage and provides excellent benefits relative to the industry, making it generally one of the best employers for unskilled workers.

Thanks for the dividend comparison article. Pretty good points about the catch up problem. Since I'm a stock price guy, my focus was that WMT, adjusted for inflation, really hasn't moved in more than a decade, even using CPI which I consider to be overweight electronics and underweight (or absent) the main middle class expenses of medical and education. Of course, this fails to take into account a longer history of dividends at a higher rate.

Old Peter Lynch mentioned that he often chose companies based on the observations of his wife and her friends. One major reason I am bearish on WMT is because many people I meet loathe the messy chaos that is Walmart, and prefer Target and other shops, even if it means driving more or spending a few bucks more. I really do think WMT is the retailer of last resort for many folks, and given competition WMT will suffer unless they change their ways.

Brief aside, a store I never understood floundering was Sears Essentials. I found their stores bright, clean, with name-brand products like Kenmore and Craftsman Tools, and their prices were good (not spectacular) and the staff helpful and plentiful (try tracking down a Walmart Associate). Yet always empty, go figure. They didn't seem to market much beyond a weekly flier in the newspaper, though.

I wonder if employee turnover and squeezing is a decent Long Term strategy. Walton himself had no problem paying and keeping employees over the long haul, it was the "Professional Management" that took over after his death that began the labor squeezing. If memory serves, I remember that many long-term employees were fired in the mid 90s as a cost-cutting measure and replaced with people making half as much. I also recall the Home Depot CEO trying to win customers back after a round of severe employee squeezing that left stores with a skeleton crew that was overwhelmed by demand. And of course, Circuit City, which was managed by Moron Bean Counters:

"Hey Boss, let's fire all the best performing sales people to save a few bucks this quarter and pay ourselves bigger bonuses."
"Herpa Derp, sounds like a thinking outside the box strategy! They're only HS graduates and College dropouts, easily replaced."
"Hey, all our best salespeople are now at Best Buy and Tiger Direct while our sales are plummeting! And, why can't we find any great salespeople?!"

43   marcus   ignore (10)   2013 Sep 16, 2:00pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

FortWayne says

That watch is correct at least twice a day.

IT's got you beat.

44   Buster   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 16, 2:34pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

DON'T SHOP AT WALLY WORLD!

45   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (41)   2013 Sep 16, 3:31pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

We're pretty much the only industrialized country in the world where a brush with a terminal disease can make you lose everything you worked for, even if you have insurance.

Why do you hate innovation?

46   FortWayne   ignore (4)   2013 Sep 18, 3:48am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

marcus says

FortWayne says

That watch is correct at least twice a day.

IT's got you beat.

Home team advantage.

47   upisdown   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 23, 9:58am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Vicente says

Dan8267
says



Selling for less than cost to run competition out of business is called
price dumping and I believe it's illegal in most states.


You really think that is enforced? It would be difficult to prove without
getting all UP IN the books. And we know the bigger/richer the corporation, the
more likely the lawyers and accountants have money & means to prevent
that.

Not to mention the free shit from the local/county government when they build a new store like turn lanes and utilities run onto the property that other businesses ever get.

My biggest complaint by far, and I have seen this happen in more than a couple of locations is the deals that Wal Mart makes with them keeping the sales tax for X amount of time. They run their competitors out of business and those businesses are then no longer generating/collecting sales tax, so the revenue from that sales tax plummets, and the taxing body with jurisdiction raises the tax rate to offset the drop, and Wal Mart gets a windfall.

Then there's the property tax abatements for 20 years, on average, and when they expire Wal Mart closes the store and builds a new store right next to it to get a new abatement. Ma and Pa Kettle across the street with a 1st or even 2nd/3rd generation business doesn't get that luxury.

Also there's the profit leak whereas the profits do not stay local, and I'm not even factoring in the rise in county services because their employees can barely afford food, but definitely not health care.

48   upisdown   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 23, 10:17am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

Increasingly, Wallyworld is getting the bottom rungs of consumers; whereas
before they had a much more diverse (and profitable) customer base. With that
bottom rung base comes more security problems, as well. Walmart Parking Lots are
often huge black spots in otherwise crime free locales.

One of Wal Mart's biggest chunk of income is SNAP payments. Over half of Wal Mart's income is from food(around 53%) and in some locations 40% or more of their business is from SNAP recipients, and it's very high and common especially in the South.

The recent Farm Bill in congress had the food and farm portions of it seperated with some hard proposals to lower SNAP spending drastically. The way Wal Mart throws around lobbyist money, and the fact that the lowered spending will affect their profits, it won't ever happen. I thought that it was a ruse all along just to up political contributions, considering that 532 companies signed a petition against splitting the two parts.

49   HonkpilledMaster   ignore (5)   2013 Sep 25, 4:07am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

That's stunning, upisdown.

Basically, Wally is a welfare 'ho, they profit off SNAP.

Can you believe that companies are allowed to keep sales tax revenue? It's un-freakin' believable. The big boys who can afford it get out of it, while the old established mom & pops and smaller franchises pay normally.

I heard it's not only legal for the government to treat companies arbitrarily different than others, but to keep it a secret from taxpayers.

50   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 25, 5:38am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

APOCALYPSEFUCK is Comptroller says

Can’t get the items they want. Many shoppers complain that they go to Wal-Mart with a list but can’t get all the items they want on them. They leave with three of seven, or even worse, one of seven. Many of them complain that the store has empty shelves and spaces that will stay that way for a long time.

No one is there to help anymore. More than one of the shoppers said that they couldn’t find an employee to help them. I have experienced that many times.

Long checkout lines. Consumers from stores all across the country complained about check out times. The average amount of time was 15 minutes.

I think the first one causes the second one, since on the rare freak occasion WalMart has what I want in stock, I stock up since I never know when I am going to see what I came in for again.

51   upisdown   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 25, 5:41am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

thunderlips11 says

Basically, Wally is a welfare 'ho, they profit off SNAP

Wal Mart may have the (rightfully earned) rep of the low-life of the retailers, but their growth has matched the growth in SNAP of the last 13 years too. They are still a perveyor of cheap and mostly short-lived Chinese junk, but they morphed into a major player in the grocery business with a 25% market share that growing year by year.

thunderlips11 says

Can you believe that companies are allowed to keep sales tax revenue? It's
un-freakin' believable. The big boys who can afford it get out of it, while the
old established mom & pops and smaller franchises pay normally.

I have a friend who is now the 4th generation to run the family deli, and they have to compete head to head against Wal Mart on prices, and yet Wal Mart can advertise their very own "version" of choice and select cuts of meat. Factor in the slaes tax retention and numerous other advantages, it's not even a competition for my friends. They survive solely on reputation and name recognition, along with their same location for almost 50 years. They have little to no marketing because they just get undercut when the ad makes a full circle, but Wal Mart hurts Wal Mart the most because of their own reputation. my friends are in a catch-22 position whereas they are paying full taxes and such with an outdated building and location, but if they move Wal Mart will use political pressure to drive up all of their udate/relocation costs to put them out of business.

Back in the 90's quite a few of the small time mayors pushed pretty hard for the big box stores to locate to their cities/towns for the convenience and (now obvious) false sense of growth or revenues. Those part-time shit-pay jobs, along with giving away tons of perks to attract ANY retailers has not, or will it ever, pay for itself. One area nearby that did that can't even afford to fix the heavily traveled road where those box stores are located, and is fortunate that it is a state highway and the state picks up the bill. The citizens of the rest of the state just paid to redo that road and improve it with more turn lanes last year also, and ironically the mayor's time in office lasted as long as that road did.

52   freak80   ignore (4)   2013 Sep 25, 5:44am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

upisdown says

Back in the 90's quite a few of the small time mayors pushed pretty hard for the big box stores to locate to their cities/towns for the convenience and (now obvious) false sense of growth or revenues.

And for bribes. Don't forget the bribes.

53   upisdown   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 25, 6:03am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

freak80 says

And for bribes. Don't forget the bribes.

Boy, isn't that the truth. A bar/liquor store nearby was run out of business when the mayor(who was the former police chief)informed the owner that his liquor license would not be renewed and to just sell his building. Come to find out, the mayor had already conjured up a deal with one of the big local gas station chains to buy the property, with some generous city gas purchase contracts and......relection money for the mayor. He was in a very tight race politically last election and barely won. Ironically that gas station is practically the only business on that street to make any money/pay any taxes because of all the BS, T.I.F. district status that the mayor fought for, and got for most of the businesses and buildings.
That gas station is the ONLY gas station in the whole area to have a full liquor department because of the mayor's approval of some moronic exception because the gas station sits on the property where the former liquor store was. No other gas station around, including any of that locla chains' locations, has that perk.

54   Quigley   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 25, 7:17am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

As awful as Walmart is, it's not going anywhere. Too many towns and small cities have little to no alternative for shopping except their local Walmart. The citizens of these blighted places struggle on year by year, subsisting on welfare and small income from odd jobs and seasonal work. Walmart is their mama, they go to her for nearly everything.

55   HydroCabron   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 25, 7:35am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Wouldn't a tax cut for top earners solve this?

56   freak80   ignore (4)   2013 Sep 25, 10:29am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Quigley,

It's almost like a company town. You work for and buy everything from your employer.

57   curious2   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 25, 11:22am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

freak80 says

It's almost like a company town. You work for and buy everything from your employer.

And now Walmart sells Rx pills too. CAFO feedlot capitalism is the future of the Matrix economy, with the employees on food stamps and the customers on Obamacare, all plugged into the local cable company watching "Big Brother".

59   Quigley   ignore (0)   2013 Sep 25, 12:46pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

bgamall4 says

freak80 says

Quigley,

It's almost like a company town. You work for and buy everything from your employer.

Think how much more they could buy if they were paid more.

How would that help shareholders?

60   HydroCabron   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 25, 12:56pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

bgamall4 says

freak80 says

Quigley,

It's almost like a company town. You work for and buy everything from your employer.

Think how much more they could buy if they were paid more.

But they're not entrepreneurs. They didn't work hard. They haven't earned it.

If you speculate in derivatives, run a bank or hedge fund, sell real estate, or just import goods from China to sell to people here, you are a wealth creator.

Tax cuts for the wealth creators give them the money to create things, and build products. And, as we learn from real estate, supply creates demand. The consumer, seeing houses or products - or, in technology markets, solutions - steps forward to purchase these products, creating a spiral of more products and, in turn more demand for them.

Remember: production creates demand. Why do you think we have seen the shrinking wealth gap between rich and poor over the past 30 years?

Tax cuts have made us all happier, healthier, and better off, and every dollar cut from government spending, with the sole exception of military spending, creates greater efficiencies in capital allocation that improve the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the quality of our personal and sexual relationships with both people and animals.

I truly believe that the tax cuts of 1981-1988, and then, particularly, the tax cuts of 2001-2009, have created the heaven spoken of in scripture, but here on earth.

61   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (41)   2013 Sep 25, 3:18pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WalMart at least has the balls to kick the commies in the 'nads at home and exploit them for slave labor abroad like real capitalists, instead of offering their assholes to the workers like Costco.

They should change their name to RapeMart.

At RapeMart, we rape America, because it's the right thing to do.

62   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (41)   2013 Sep 25, 3:36pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

RapeMart, Every Sale a Savage Violation of Human Decency Which is for Assholes!

63   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 26, 2:40am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

bgamall4 says

There is more customer service at dollar stores. My wife is an addict.

I worry about what she buys there. I hope the shampoo doesn't turn me China green.

The shampoo I buy at the Dollar store is made in USA, and I don't worry about any bad side effects.

64   freak80   ignore (4)   2013 Sep 26, 2:47am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HydroCabron says

But they're not entrepreneurs. They didn't work hard. They haven't earned it.


If you speculate in derivatives, run a bank or hedge fund, sell real estate, or just import goods from China to sell to people here, you are a wealth creator.

Of course. People who actually do the work don't make a damn thing. They're just lazy bums who deserve their miserable lot in life. The people who collect the fruits of their labor are the true producers of this country. The real American heros.

65   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2013 Sep 27, 4:51am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-23/wal-mart-elevates-70-000-workers-amid-stocking-complaints.html

Wal-Mart Hires Workers for Holidays Amid Shelf Complaints

Wal-Mart usually hires temporary workers to get ready for the holiday shopping season. The company is adding more permanent people to improve customer service after failing to keep shelves stocked and handle other store-level operations, said David Galper, head of retail and apparel investment banking for KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The U.S. workforce at Wal-Mart’s namesake and Sam’s Club warehouse chains fell by about 120,000 employees in the past five years, to about 1.3 million, according to regulatory filings. In that time, the company has added more than 500 U.S. stores through July 31. That workforce decline has coincided with customer frustration that there aren’t enough employees to keep shelves stocked, cash registers manned and shoppers’ questions answered, Bloomberg reported earlier this year.

Cleveland Research Co. said in a Sept. 18 report that “one of the key issues” hindering Wal-Mart’s store operations “is the lack of labor in the stores to get the inventory out of the back rooms and onto the sales floor.”

I will believe it when I see the shelves stocked properly.

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