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1   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (2)   2017 Jan 11, 3:03pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

OMG!... California has, like,... rain!

2   MAGA   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 11, 4:02pm   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Bring in the Realtor's. That looks like a million dollar property.

3   Booger   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 11, 4:39pm   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Does this mean that you can take a shower now?

4   HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2017 Jan 11, 5:13pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Let's wait & see how the drought works out toward the end of 2017.

5   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 11, 7:33pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

This drenching, incessant rain is the disastrous product of Global Warming.

Wait, I thought the drought was the disastrous product of Global Warming.

6   Strategist   ignore (2)   2017 Jan 11, 7:42pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Will our water bills go down?

7   Rashomon   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 11, 7:44pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Strategist says

Will our water bills go down?

No, they'll probably go up for the repairs. Still, good to see the rain.

8   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 11, 8:05pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Q: I give you all your food for the year, to last 365 days, in single day. How well do you fare the year?
A: You starve by end of year. The excess food spoils and is not able to sustain you. It becomes waste before you can use it.

The truth is that this has been a multi-year drought in the making, and we have been tapping groundwater hard, throughout the state for many years. The estimates on how long it takes to make ground water vary, but none are close to 1 year because of 10 inches of rain in a winter storm.

I'm grateful for the snowpack and full reservoirs. That IS "stored water" useable later. But the excess we don't capture is mostly headed to the ocean. California has done a bad job building more capture, overall, as well. Combine that with "aging infrastructure" in the US. We are not well prepared for the new normals in the climate ... yet. A dry spring and a hot dry summer puts us right back.

In the new paradigm of climate change, more extreme weather is: wetter wets and dryer drys.

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-storms-drought-20170111-story.html

9   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 11, 8:06pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

The policy is to keep complaining of disaster until California and it's groundwaters are returned to their pristine, unpopulated water tables of yore. That way, the rates keep rising, and there's always a "good" reason to shaft the consumer.

10   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Jan 11, 8:35pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Rashomon says

No, they'll probably go up for the repairs. Still, good to see the rain.

fuck you bigsby, you limey twat.

11   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Jan 11, 8:37pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Rew says

In the new paradigm of climate change

the "new"? are you seriously arguing that climate has not changed in the past?

12   ForcedTQ   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 11, 8:47pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Rashomon says

Strategist says

Will our water bills go down?

No, they'll probably go up for the repairs. Still, good to see the rain.

They will go up regardless, noting that consumers have done such a good job conserving at the rates they have been called to. Now they have budget expenses that are increasing this year and infrastructure is about to fail/failing (which in many cases is true.) Cost per Ccf HAS TO RISE!!! All the while residents of CA have to accept additional bodies in the state further dilluting the acceptable Ccf/Person allocation, and increasing the competition (price) for water even further!

13   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 12, 12:22am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

landtof says

the "new"? are you seriously arguing that climate has not changed in the past?

Your hangup on semantics and feigned naïveté is laughable.
Yes, the climate has changed on Earth, and will continue to change into the future. Would "greater extremes in weather" suffice for you?

14   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 12, 12:33am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Ceffer says

The policy is to keep complaining of disaster until California and it's groundwaters are returned to their pristine, unpopulated water tables of yore. That way, the rates keep rising, and there's always a "good" reason to shaft the consumer.

Heaven forbid we pay what clean water is actually worth now or worry about providing water for the State residents and business where it is in demand. If we continue on the path we are, the resource becomes more scarce, and more expensive.

The municipalities around me are actually are starting to worry about clean water limiting their ability to grow. Imagine that? They cannot provide enough clean water throughout the year to increase the town populations.

No one is arguing for an absolute return to pre-Human era groundwater levels in California. Better management, investment in capture, upgrade of infrastructure, and protection ... f-yeah!

What is crazy, is every time water projects are proposed, Californian's claim some BS about the 'indigenous rock weevil that only nests in that area' being threatened, and the EIR takes 4 years to complete, to build essentially what amounts to a concrete lined hole in the ground. THAT is the real environmental crap to be pissed about. I'm very humanist at the core.

15   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 12:41am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Time to conquer Canada and establish a pipeline.

16   Rashomon   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 3:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

landtof says

Rashomon says

No, they'll probably go up for the repairs. Still, good to see the rain.

fuck you bigsby, you limey twat.

You're such a sad sack it's laughable. Mummy not give you enough love when you were young? Or more likely dropped you on your head. Repeatedly.

17   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 7:19am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Do you pay $50 per month per person for water in CA yet? That's what it costs in Baltimore City!

18   Strategist   ignore (2)   2017 Jan 12, 7:43am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

zzyzzx says

Do you pay $50 per month per person for water in CA yet? That's what it costs in Baltimore City!

I think it's less in California. The average yard is a lot smaller, so people use less.

19   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Jan 12, 8:03am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Rew says

Your hangup on semantics and feigned naïveté is laughable.

Yes, the climate has changed on Earth, and will continue to change into the future. Would "greater extremes in weather" suffice for you?

oh, it's laughable is it? "greater" extremes is the "new" paradigm?

here's where your narrative gets completely destroyed:

20   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 8:22am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Strategist says

I think it's less in California. The average yard is a lot smaller, so people use less.

Most people in Baltimore city have little or NO yard.

21   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 8:22am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/Officials-More-than-40-percent-of-California-out-10852736.php

Officials: More than 40 percent of California out of drought after powerful storms.

22   Tenpoundbass   ignore (11)   2017 Jan 12, 8:51am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

NO! The water authority will soon dump all of the collected water into the ocean citing it's killing cockroach larvae.

23   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Jan 12, 10:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

In Baltimore, they spike the water with crack and Prozac to keep the populace at bay. If you take that into account, Baltimore is cheaper.

24   rootvg   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 12, 10:05am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Ceffer says

The policy is to keep complaining of disaster until California and it's groundwaters are returned to their pristine, unpopulated water tables of yore. That way, the rates keep rising, and there's always a "good" reason to shaft the consumer.

You're right. My wife and I are tired of it but we're stuck there. I've resolved to not shut about it any more.

25   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Jan 12, 10:24am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

landtof says

here's where your narrative gets completely destroyed:

Strawman.

No climatologist, anywhere, is claiming man made carbon the sole factor in weather (including local California conditions). What they are saying is: it is making droughts more severe, storms stronger, tipping us toward patterns we haven't seen in a long time, and is set to continue and grow. Simply, there is more energy in the system: wetter wets, dryer drys, colder colds, hotter hots.

The existence of megadroughts, or other extreme weather in the past, doesn't disprove current trends toward extreme weather now. It's been over 1000 years since we have measured a dry this dry by the climate record. On my scale, that's pretty extreme. It is "NEW" for how I define it, and the continued things we see across the globe, are "NEW" too.

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/14/science/californias-history-of-drought-repeats.html?

"Most climate models show Northern California becoming slightly wetter in the decades to come, but at the same time, average temperatures are expected to increase across the state. And just as record-high temperatures exacerbated the drought this year by causing more evaporation and reducing snowpack, warmer conditions can be expected to make things worse in the future."

“Climate change is really weighting the dice” in favor of future megadroughts, said Toby R. Ault, a researcher at Cornell University and an author of the study.

Those calling the "drought over" ... yes we have stores of water and less than 60% of California in drought for the first time since April 2013. The groundwater deficit remains. Likely La Niña keeps us wet in Spring. That's good. It still remains less than a year can take it all away again, where we start borrowing against groundwater, and current climate looks setup to do just that ... soon.

26   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Dec 19, 4:12pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

http://fox40.com/2017/12/19/sierra-snow-pack-way-below-normal/
All sorts of news questioning snowpack levels right now for CA.

"You mean one magical deluge didn't cure us?"
"Nope."
28   HEYYOU   ignore (23)   2017 Dec 19, 4:33pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HEY YOU says

Let's wait & see how the drought works out toward the end of 2017.



How's it working out,living in a desert,choking on smoke & looking at the pile of cinders that used to be shacks?
29   Rew   ignore (0)   2017 Dec 19, 4:44pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HEYYOU says
How's it working out,living in a desert,choking on smoke & looking at the pile of cinders that used to be shacks?


Santa Rosa, Santa Barbara, LA ... and much more. Fire season still going right now, in December. Ugh.
30   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Dec 19, 8:45pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Rew says
"You mean one magical deluge didn't cure us?"
"Nope."


One benefit, less standing water for mosquitoes to breed and carry Zika.

You're saved!
31   Strategist   ignore (2)   2017 Dec 19, 9:00pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HEYYOU says
HEY YOU says

Let's wait & see how the drought works out toward the end of 2017.



How's it working out,living in a desert,choking on smoke & looking at the pile of cinders that used to be shacks?


I know it's not working out very well. What's your point, you sound happy with the fire?
32   WookieMan   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 2, 7:58am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

How's this season going so far you CA guys? Last year I'd stumbled across an article almost daily without trying. Haven't heard much this year. I assume just normal then?
33   DASKAA   ignore (3)   2018 Feb 2, 8:08am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
How's this season going so far you CA guys? Last year I'd stumbled across an article almost daily without trying. Haven't heard much this year. I assume just normal then?


Feels like less rain than normal and skiing in the Sierra is pretty meh, but it's still early in the season. Also the reservoirs are all full.
34   WookieMan   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 2, 8:18am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
Also the reservoirs are all full.

So how's that going to work out when it melts or does it get drawn down a decent amount over the next 3-4 months? I'm being serious, this drought out there has always intrigued me. I get the use of Lake Michigan fresh water, so these problems are kind of foreign to me.

I just can't believe better planning and resources weren't put into the whole system. Seems kind of silly in this day to be behind the growth curve and not have planned for needing more water.
35   DASKAA   ignore (3)   2018 Feb 2, 8:37am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
Satoshi_Nakamoto says
Also the reservoirs are all full.

So how's that going to work out when it melts or does it get drawn down a decent amount over the next 3-4 months? I'm being serious, this drought out there has always intrigued me. I get the use of Lake Michigan fresh water, so these problems are kind of foreign to me.

I just can't believe better planning and resources weren't put into the whole system. Seems kind of silly in this day to be behind the growth curve and not have planned for needing more water.


Dude, we have more pressing priorities than building additional reservoir capacity. You know, stuff like bullet train between Fresno and Bakersfield or scolarships for illegals.
36   WookieMan   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 2, 8:44am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says

Dude, we have more pressing priorities than building additional reservoir capacity. You know, stuff like bullet train between Fresno and Bakersfield or scolarships for illegals.

I guess you can't have it all. Got to pick your priorities ;)

It will be funny when the illegals can't go to school or ride the bullet train because they're dead from dehydration. Infrastructure is generally one thing government has done okay with (I know, I know, bullet train). Apparently no one in CA government was a boy scout or logical person. Be prepared. To have fresh water. To you know, survive!




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