Heres how much housing prices have skyrocketed over the last 50 years
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Heres how much housing prices have skyrocketed over the last 50 years

By BayAreaObserver following x   2017 Jun 24, 3:03am 1,832 views   14 comments   watch   quote     share  


If you want to buy a house this year, you may well be paying around $199,200, the median price for a home in the U.S., according to Zillow.

Houses weren't always this expensive. In 1940, the median home value in the U.S. was just $2,938. In 1980, it was $47,200, and by 2000, it had risen to $119,600. Even adjusted for inflation, the median home price in 1940 would only have been $30,600 in 2000 dollars, according to data from the U.S. Census.

Here's how much the median home value in the U.S. has changed between 1940 and 2000:
•1940: $2,938
•1950: $7,354
•1960: $11,900
•1970: $17,000
•1980: $47,200
•1990: $79,100
•2000: $119,600

Here are those values again, adjusted for 2000 dollars:
•1940: $30,600
•1950: $44,600
•1960: $58,600
•1970: $65,600
•1980: $93,400
•1990: $101,100
•2000: $119,600

It's natural for prices to rise over time. But the issue here is that home values are outpacing inflation, making it nearly impossible for new and young buyers to enter the market.

Dramatically higher prices are partly why the typical homebuyer is now 44, whereas in 1981, the typical homebuyer was 25-34.

In 2016, home prices rose twice as fast as inflation. And in nearly two-thirds of the country, housing price growth exceeded wage growth. While homes in some towns remained affordable, in places like Manhattan and San Francisco buyers would need to fork over between 95 and 120 percent of their average paycheck to afford a mortgage payment.

More Including Sub Links etc. http://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/23/how-much-housing-prices-have-risen-since-1940.html

#Housing #Economics #RealEstate

1 Tenpoundbass   ignore (6)   2017 Jun 24, 6:20am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Why does it stop at the bubble?

2 BayArea   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 24, 6:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

You're missing the last 17 most interesting and speculative years!

3 BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Jun 24, 7:07am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Here is a link from the census bureau showing the median and average sales price of a new home from January 1963 up to May 2017.

https://www.census.gov/construction/nrs/pdf/uspricemon.pdf

The link below is probably what the author of the article used. It does show more information for each state but only up to 2000.

https://www.census.gov/hhes/www/housing/census/historic/values.html

4 Strategist   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 24, 9:11am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

The numbers say it all. Home prices always go up.

5 just any guy   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 24, 11:37am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Strategist says

The numbers say it all. Home prices always go up.

Everyone line up and buy more tulips before you're priced out forever!

6 APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   ignore (5)   2017 Jun 24, 3:55pm   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Housing prices will keep doubling until the price of a 3/2 in Camden = the GDP of the world and that house is sold to the One who can pay for it in cash and then flip it to JESUS! who will have to MORTGAGE! THE! SUN! and then FORECLOSES! ON! SON! OF! GOD! and FUCKS! UNIVERSE!

7 HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2017 Jun 24, 7:35pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Strategist says

The numbers say it all. Home prices always go up.

And immediate gratification,keeping up with the Jones, buyers will continue to overpay.

8 WorkInProgress   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 25, 3:45pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

I have come to the conclusion that ApocalypseFuck is the wisest or all on Pat.net. I'm serious.

9 HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2017 Jun 25, 4:05pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

WorkInProgress says

I have come to the conclusion that ApocalypseFuck is the wisest or all on Pat.net. I'm serious.

He's on Patnet. He can't be wise.

10 Strategist   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 25, 5:21pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

http://www.ocregister.com/2017/06/25/how-much-longer-can-home-prices-keep-going-up/

All hair stylist Erin Bond wants is a decent two-bedroom condo in Orange County, preferably in Huntington Beach.

But all she can afford is $400,000 to $420,000.

In a county where the median price of a condo in May was almost $500,000, she’s not sure there’s anything in her price range she can live with.

“It’s pretty disappointing,” said Bond, 35. “You can’t even buy anything that low. I mean, there are things out there, but they’re not nice.”

So Bond’s plan is to wait until the market goes down again. And if it doesn’t, “I would continue to rent.”

A lot of homebuyers are facing Bond’s conundrum.

For 62 straight months, Southern California home prices have gone in one direction. Up.

11 PeopleUnited   ignore (2)   2017 Jun 25, 6:04pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

HEY YOU says

Strategist says

The numbers say it all. Home prices always go up.

And immediate gratification,keeping up with the Jones, buyers will continue to overpay.

If there were no thirty year mortgages, prices would have to come back to reality. In the meantime renting is not that bad.

12 just any guy   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 25, 7:46pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Strategist says

For 62 straight months, Southern California home prices have gone in one direction. Up.

By the logic then, it won't ever stop. Once something has gone up for so long, it won't ever come down. It's fiziks.

13 SFace   ignore (0)   2017 Jun 26, 10:23pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

I never understood why housing would track inflation.

If the business of America is business, then in a way, the business of the American family is owning real estate.

Do you think over the last 30 years, a real estate investment trust returned the rate of inflation? Hell no, reits have outperformed the s&p 500.

So somewhere the answer lies in real estate assets track the returns of wall Street, adjusted for some variance. Inflation is not the base, but market return for reits. Rents probably outpaced inflation as well long term which drives reit returns

There is no reit in the world that owns single family homes. Except silver bay. The next best compatible will be reits from apartment owners. You can bet your life that business returned over 9% over the last 50 years.

14 Daggett76   ignore (0)   2017 Jul 19, 11:36am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Food for thought: Here's what happened if you took the median home value in 1940 and invested it an S&P 500 index fund:

1940: $2,938
1950: $4,031
1960: $13,861
1970: $21,571
1980: $26,489
1990: $81,205
2000: $340,518

Interesting of course that 2010 would have seen a dip compared to 2000, but in 2017 it would have reached almost $600k.


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