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Remodeling house question. Do I bother running wiring for land line phones?

By zzyzzx following x   2017 Jul 11, 9:48am 872 views   19 comments   watch   quote     share  

And should I remove at least some of the existing wiring for phone lines that was added over the years, and looks like crap because they used surface mounted phone boxes? Like these:

I mean nobody uses these any more, and I figure as part of my cleanup to remove all of these, but leave in all the in the wall ones (total on one in the house). Or am I missing something here because the only in the wall phone outlet is in the kitchen, and maybe I could see a use for an in the wall phone outlet in another room is someone wants to put in DSL, or something???

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1 YesYNot   2017 Jul 11, 9:57am   ↑ like (3)   ↑ dislike (3)     quote        

Run 2 ether net lines to each room /area. Wires work better than air, and they are cheap. Don't run them next to and parallel to power lines. Crossing power lines perpendicular is ok. Don't bother with the phone lines. If you need to, you can run a phone signal over half of one cat 5.

2 Tenpoundbass   2017 Jul 11, 10:00am   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        

You'll at least need one if you have internet.

3 zzyzzx   2017 Jul 11, 10:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

The problem with running Ethernet lines is that they keep getting outdated and I have no fucking idea where they are likely to put the hub anyway. Otherwise I'd agree and just run cat 6. That and I suspect most people are stupid and just use wifi for everything anyway. If I do run Ethernet, where do I assume the router is? Do people normally put that in the living room, a bedroom, or someplace else?

My thinking was to remove the phone lines, and removed the currently draped around cable TV lines and do the cable TV lines proper (in the wall, complete with jacks).

4 bob2356   2017 Jul 11, 10:55am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

wire is dead. you can easily do wireless everything. cable tv, internet, phone, whatever. Aries works just fine for wireless cable tv. You can put everything at the entry point and use range extenders. The wireless speeds are just going to get faster and faster.

5 zzyzzx   2017 Jul 11, 11:04am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

Never heard of wireless cable before... How common is that?

6 YesYNot   2017 Jul 11, 11:56am   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        

I did this twice recently. Used cat 5, because it was cheap. In my experience, it is much faster and more reliable than wireless with a $200 router. I put the wired hub where the internet came into the house in a utility room. You can then put the router in another room if you want.

7 APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   2017 Jul 11, 12:07pm   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        

You got kids, elders in the house, you want the copper service for 911 service and for emergencies in which power outages leave the router unpowered.

RBOCs or whatever they are called these days are one of the largest independent power generation enterprises in the country to keep the phone lines powered. Makes the copper a lifeline when other utilities are sideways.

8 HEY YOU   2017 Jul 11, 12:12pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

Old saying;"Better safe than sorry."
Any surface mounts have destroyed America.
..
So some don't like wires.
I'm enjoying my wi-fi electricity.
Some live in a shack with underground power
but won't bitch & moan about the electric meter stuck to side of the house.
That looks like shit! What are you White Trash?

9 FortWayne   2017 Jul 11, 12:15pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        

Land line can be emergency lines, cell towers go down in earthquakes, but not land lines.

We don't have one anymore though

10 zzyzzx   2017 Jul 11, 12:20pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        

We don't have earthquakes here. Yes, as long as I am running wires, yes it's easy enough to put Ethernet and cable into the same wall outlet.

11 FunTime   2017 Jul 20, 4:56pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

The main benefit given by the PoTS(Plain ol' telephone service) is the reliability and the aforementioned 90V of electricity. Those things have their own power line! There are DSL services that can give more than 30 Mbps data service but they depend on distance to hubs. see ADSL2+ etc. AT&T was using but because coax cable is so widespread most are resorting to fiber distribution as close to homes as they can get(usually not very close) and then jumping on the coax.

12 bob2356   2017 Jul 20, 6:06pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

zzyzzx says

Never heard of wireless cable before... How common is that?

Not common. If I didn't have cable to a room I would just use the wireless. There are a couple systems out there.

FunTime says

the aforementioned 90V of electricity.

Ringer voltage is 60-105 vrms 20 hertz ac. On hook the voltage is 48 dc. Off hook voltage is 3-9 volts dc. Ringer voltage can really knock the crap out of you.

YesYNot says

If you need to, you can run a phone signal over half of one cat 5.

Actually you can run phone over 1/4 of a cat 5. Unless you have a lighted princess phone you only need a single twisted pair of the 4 for tip and ring. Usually the blue. This won't work with gigabit ethernet which uses all 4 pairs.

FortWayne says

Land line can be emergency lines, cell towers go down in earthquakes, but not land lines.

I'm thinking you've never seen trees knocking down wires somehow. I've used voip since 2001 then just cell since 2012. Never had an issue. The new wireless standards are so fast and have such great range I'd just set up wireless whatever in a central location if the wiring wasn't there.

13 anonymous   2017 Jul 20, 7:10pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

home structured wiring terminates into an enclosure usually in the master bedroom closet. all RG6 COAX combine into a large splitter/hub and all ethernet CAT5/6 go into a switch (you can even get one with PoE). Add a voice module for phone line runs if you want, but usually there's dedicated wire and faceplates for phone runs only in the master bedroom, kitchen area, and home office / den room as applicable. add video surveillance and security modules and wiring as needed.

this way, the user can add a modem and gateway in any room that is wired for COAX and CAT5/6 and other rooms will be joined to the network upon connection. you could also pick a room to hook the modem up to, run its ethernet interface to the wall faceplate, then add a gateway to the enclosure to receive that specific room's CAT5/6 line that then feeds the switch and the other rooms.

check out LEGRAND products, for the enclosure and voice/video/data modules.

14 FortWayne   2017 Jul 20, 7:15pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

bob2356 says

I'm thinking you've never seen trees knocking down wires somehow. I've used voip since 2001 then just cell since 2012. Never had an issue. The new wireless standards are so fast and have such great range I'd just set up wireless whatever in a central location if the wiring wasn't there.

Yeah wasn't thinking of one that serious, and never seen that. Was thinking of those routine quakes that just make the news and temporarily knock out all cell towers.

15 RealEstateIsBetterThanStocks   2017 Jul 20, 9:06pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

i don t have wires for anything.

WiFi for networking and cell phones only.

16 anonymous   2017 Jul 21, 10:29am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        

i have structured home wiring for voice/data/video and still use wireless in conjunction with all of that. it's much better to attach a wireless AP with PoE to some rooms to create a mesh. there are some cool products that serve as an AP that replace the faceplate in the wall and still provide an ethernet interface for wired devices.

it just depends how large the house is and how tidy you want to make the telecom.

17 NuttBoxer   2017 Sep 18, 2:44pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
If this is in California, you are responsible as the owner to have at least one working phone line in the house. Laws change a lot slower than tech...
Aside from that, ATT still uses phone lines for their internet service, and Cox/giant cable ISP, still run a wire from the street that needs to connect to a router for cable/tv. And then theirs people like me who don't want the radiation, and crawl under our rental running wires for EVERYTHING.
18 jvolstad   2017 Sep 18, 5:34pm   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
I would unless it terribly expensive. I would also run some Cat 6 next to your phone lines.

I use Verizon Wireless Home Phone in addition to my Verizon Cell service.

https://www.verizonwireless.com/home-office-solutions/wireless-home-phone/
19 CL   2017 Sep 18, 7:25pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Sorry. A little late here.

Here's what I've done historically. Put a patch panel in the garage. Most of that equipment is bullshit and ugly, and it mitigates the question about which room to terminate in. You can link to any room.

Do Cat 5 or 6. 6 is probably overkill for residential, even into the future, but do whatever you want there.

RJ45 jacks can handle RJ11 male ends. No recabling or anything necessary, so you can plug your phones into the same jacks as telco. Phones use the center pair --no work.

Garages are good for a little mini or half height rack. Switches can be loud or give off heat, especially as everyone moves to POE. You also get to stand up and work, instead of dicking around behind someone's desk, dresser or credenza.

Flexible for current and future needs.

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