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Walmart... do you shop there?

By PCGyver following x   2017 Jul 11, 11:10am 1,384 views   13 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


1   Dan8267   ignore (3)   2017 Jul 12, 8:44am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote        

Walmart is another example of capitalism's failure. All of Walmart's wealth creation is done by the employees, not the Walton family. Yet...

1. Walmart's economic profit is $16 billion/yr. (video)
2. Each store costs tax payers from $904k/yr to $1.75m/yr. (video) Let's be conservative and call that $1.3m/yr per store on average.
3. There are 4,177 Walmarts in the U.S..
4. That's $5.43 billion/yr of taxpayer money supporting Walmart each year. Let's round to $5.5 billion/yr for simplicity.
5. This makes their non-subsidized economic profit $11.5 billion/yr.
6. There are 1.4 million Walmart employees in the U.S. and 2.1 million worldwide. Note that the former is 1% of the U.S.'s 140 million working population.
7. Eliminating the tax subsidies for Walmart and converting the economic profit to normal profit, that is letting the workers keep more of their wealth production, would
7a. Save the U.S. taxpayer $5.5 billion/yr.
7b. Would increase wages for employees (using the global figure) by $5476/yr.
8. The average wage for a Walmart employee is $11.83/hr. (video). Since Walmart tries to keep wages and worked hours as secret as possible to avoid public scrutiny, I have to estimate. Given that Walmart strongly prefers part-time workers to eliminate benefits, I'll be generous to Walmart and minimize the maximum error by estimating 20 hr/wk. Based on this, the average Walmart employee in the U.S. would be making $11,830/yr. No wonder they are on food stamps and assisted housing. The $5476 increase in pay would therefore be a 46% raise
9. This means that Walmart is effectively taxing its employees 32% of their wealth production even before the government takes a penny. That's in addition to Walmart taxing you. Imagine if the government raised your taxes by over 32%. That's what working for Walmart is like. And if you are a more productive worker working in a more productive industry, your corporation probably taxes you at an even higher rate.

And capitalism has no problems?

2   Hassan_Rouhani   ignore (3)   2017 Jul 12, 8:46am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I'm buying motor oil there. No reason to pay extra $10 for the same shit at parts store.

3   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Jul 12, 8:50am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Walmart... do you shop there?

Of course! I fucking love the place. About to go there right now and buy some shit for my cat.

4   Tenpoundbass   ignore (10)   2017 Jul 12, 8:58am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Not sense they started selling only Halal meats.

5   Quigley   ignore (0)   2017 Jul 12, 9:39am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

No. Whether I'm buying hard goods or food, I want quality. Walmart filters out quality with their low prices mission and the pressure they put on suppliers to deliver at the lowest price. You can starve to death (nutritionally) eating low quality food, while getting obese in the process.
And if I want something I bought to break two days after I bought it, it'll be a sporting clay.
No reason to shop there at all imho

6   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Jul 12, 9:50am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I don't shop anywhere wtf. Maybe that makes me a bad actor in our economy, but I'm just not in to shopping.

But I've found myself in Walmart a time or two if we need something...Sofie shorts at midnight, or a brake light bulb in the middle of the night. Often last minute stop before a vacation to buy water socks or goggles,,,the kind of cheap crap that you don't travel back home from vacation with.

Otherwise if we're buying cheap disposable crap we get it from Dollar Tree. We just don't consume much crap. My lady loves treasure hunting at Goodwill, and always finds brand new high end stuff with the tags on it for a couple bucks. We keep it moving and donate it all back to Goodwill. Over the course of a year, she turns a profit goodwilling, it only takes a few Waterford Crystal finds etc. We stopped at one in Nashville on holiday this winter and hit the jackpot....a pricy piece of luggage we bought and filled with a few treasures and it flew home for free with us.

Walmart sucks balls , I get anxiety thinking about waiting in queues for 15 minutes to ring out a few pieces of landfill fodder

7   Quigley   ignore (0)   2017 Jul 12, 10:40am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I'm gonna pop some tags...🎵

8   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Jul 12, 10:55am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Quigley says

No reason to shop there at all imho

Walmart is a good place to buy consumables.

9   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (32)   2017 Jul 12, 1:15pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I took a shit in one in Florida and actually used the bathroom.

10   BayArea   ignore (0)   2017 Jul 12, 1:40pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I don't, but I do pop into Target once in a blue moon with my wife, mostly because it's local.

11   bob2356   ignore (1)   2017 Jul 12, 3:54pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote        

zzyzzx says

Of course! I fucking love the place. About to go there right now and buy some shit for my cat.

Most people get rid of cat shit. This explains a lot about your posts.

12   Goran_K   ignore (2)   2017 Jul 12, 5:02pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Straw Man says

I'm buying motor oil there. No reason to pay extra $10 for the same shit at parts store.

Car batteries, gun ammo, sports t-shirt, and fried chicken all in one trip.

I love WalMart.

13   jvolstad   ignore (0)   2017 Jul 12, 5:30pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sometimes online.





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