forgot password register

reset password

register

patrick.net

 

#politics


#housing #investing #politics #random more»
770,724 comments by 11,155 registered users, 9 online now: anotheraccount, astronut97, BlueSardine, Blurtman, Booger, freespeak, iwog, PCGyver, storm1
new post
« prev   politics   next »

-3

Russia waged a huge cyberwar against the U.S.

By Dan8267 following x   2017 Jul 30, 2:35pm 272 views   3 comments   watch   quote     share  

The Russian government had tens of thousands of fake Facebook accounts and Twitter accounts which they used to microtarget individual voters in swing districts to get Trump elected. Russia conducted the greatest psychological warfare campaign world history and won. Trump has obstructed the investigation into this because he benefited from it. And since this is not being investigated, it will happen again.

Russia also attacked Ukraine with a worm. Cyberattacks are cyber-terrorism and need to be dealt with as such even, nay, especially when state-sponsored.

#politics

1 BayAreaObserver   2017 Oct 3, 1:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
China’s plan for massive cyber-warrior expansion. Beijing views cybersecurity and national security as equals, and a war between China and the US, if it ever occurs, will witness many cyberspace duels.

Chinese mastery in cyber-warfare was without a doubt on General Joseph Dunford’s mind when as chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff he named China as the greatest future threat to US security at a congressional hearing last week.

Serious cases of hacking in recent years have demonstrated China’s growing cyber-warfare capability. In the past few months, China announced grand plans to expand its dominance massively in the cyber realm.

The Chinese government views cybersecurity and national security as equals. State, social, infrastructure and personal security are all deeply affected by events in the cyber domain. A war between China and the US, if it ever occurs, will witness many cyberspace duels.

To fight and win this war, China needs more highly trained cyber-warriors.

According to Tencent’s “Internet Security Report: First Half of 2017”, China currently suffers from a severe shortage of cybersecurity professionals. In the past few years, Chinese universities only graduated around 30,000 cybersecurity majors, while the current demand for such professionals has risen above 700,000 – a number projected to top 1.4 million by 2020.

The gap is huge. But the Chinese government does have a plan.

On August 15 this year, the Central Cyberspace Affairs Leading Group and the Chinese Education Ministry issued a joint decree formalizing a set of rules on constructing first-rate cybersecurity schools.

In 10 years’ time, the plan seeks to establish four to six world-class cybersecurity schools in Chinese universities as training grounds for cyber-warriors. All resources at these institutions – from teaching staff to incentive structures – will be dedicated solely to fostering top-notch cyber-warriors. Universities must meet certain criteria before they can apply for state support.

The first batch of state-sponsored pilot programs was approved in mid-September. These seven schools are Xidian University, Southeast University, Beihang University, Wuhan University, Sichuan University, the University of Science and Technology of China, and the Strategic Support Force Information Engineering University.

One quickly notices two trends. First, the seven schools encompass all regions of China, meaning the search for talent will cover the entire nation of 1.37 billion. Second, the batch is a mixture of civilian and military-affiliated universities. Such a model of civil-military integration will help schools complement one another’s limitations.

Young geeks make perfect cyber-warrior candidates. The geekier the better, since top-tier computer wizards are often strange individuals with unconventional ways of thinking. The consensus among Chinese university talent scouts is to find young Prometheans with strong cybersecurity interests and a cyber-related specialty.

More: http://www.atimes.com/article/chinas-plan-massive-cyber-warrior-expansion/
2 bob2356   2017 Oct 3, 6:37am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Dan8267 says



Russia also attacked Ukraine with a worm. Cyberattacks are cyber-terrorism and need to be dealt with as such even, nay, especially when state-sponsored.


Including American attacks on other countries?

Not that anyone is going to bother when they can watch a short youtube video and be an expert but Richard Kaplan published a really great book last year with a very in depth look at cybewarfare called Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War. Any decent library (hint for the youtube crowd, that's the big building filled with books) should have a copy.

The book is almost all about the escalation of cyber warfare and policies in response starting from the beginnings of DARPA. There is no real discussion of technology involved. The biggest takeaway is virtually all of private industry believes it's cheaper to clean up messes than to protect themselves. They have successfully resisted any type of regulation that would require protection of their (and their customers) data. Cyberwar and cyberwar planning is extensively discussed. I was very surprised how early foreign hacking and cyberwar started as well as how extensive it was even in the early days. It really does go all the way back to the beginning of the use of modems.
3 Dan8267   2017 Oct 3, 8:17am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
BayAreaObserver says
China’s plan for massive cyber-warrior expansion. Beijing views cybersecurity and national security as equals, and a war between China and the US, if it ever occurs, will witness many cyberspace duels.


Aren't you glad we outsourced all of IT to China and India? Now they have all the code monkeys and America has an aging and declining IT workforce. I'm sure that won't affect our national security during the 21st century. But hey, it only takes a few years for people to become experts in the most complex human endeavour ever, right? Oh shit, maybe not.

It takes a minimum of 20 years to build up a skilled IT workforce, and having one generation mentor the next gives a society a huge advantage in any industry. China and India now have that 20 years and are working on their second generation of IT professionals. America was in that position in the late 1990s, and our economy was better than ever because of it, but now has completely lost a generation and destroyed any possibility of mentoring the next generation. All that so that the damn executives can buy another yacht.

users   about   suggestions   source code   contact  
topics   best comments   comment jail  
10 reasons it's a terrible time to buy  
8 groups who lie about the housing market  
37 bogus arguments about housing  
get a free bumper sticker:

top   bottom   home