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Equifax says Social Security numbers, birth dates of 143 million consumers may have been exposed

By curious2 following x   2017 Sep 7, 4:40pm 946 views   45 comments   watch   quote     share  

"Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit reporting firms, announced Thursday that its computer systems had been breached, leading to the unauthorized accessing of Social Security numbers and birth dates of up to 143 million U.S. consumers.

The Atlanta-based company said the intrusion — enabled by a website vulnerability — occurred from mid-May through July. The issue was discovered July 29, and the company spent recent weeks working with a cybersecurity consultant and authorities on an investigation, which is continuing.

Equifax said it launched a website for people to check whether their data were affected and to sign up for the company’s credit-monitoring services. But a form on the website purportedly offering to “check potential impact” instead just gives users a date on which they must return to Equifax’s website to enroll in credit monitoring.

The discrepancy drew quick scorn from consumers on social media. Equifax declined to comment on the issue. Several attempts to get through on a phone line that Equifax said was dedicated to consumer calls about the data breach resulted in a busy signal.

Besides Social Security numbers and birth dates, the accessed information “primarily” includes names, addresses and, in some cases, driver’s license numbers, according to the company.

The credit card numbers for 209,000 U.S. consumers were compromised, and dispute documents related to 182,000 U.S. consumers also were accessed. An unspecified number of people in Britain and Canada were affected.

Equifax has acknowledged or been linked to several previous data breaches, including much smaller incidents in 2013 and 2015.
***
Meanwhile, Bloomberg reported that three senior Equifax executives sold a combined $1.8 million worth of company shares in the four days following the discovery of the breach, before it was made public. None of the trades were pre-scheduled, the news agency noted, citing regulatory filings.

News of the breach sent Equifax shares sliding; the stock price fell more than 13%, or $18, to about $124 in trading after markets closed.
"

Something to think about when large organizations promise that your confidential data are "safe."

#Investing #BitchesRunningAway

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6 TwoScoopsMcGee   2017 Sep 7, 7:05pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Dan8267 says
There has never been a time when only one problem plagued the world. You have to deal with multiple problems in parallel. That's just life.


The moral outrage over one guy blathering about Mexicans will be in the Media and the minds of TDS sufferers far longer than Equifax, which will probably end up actually damaging far more families than a rant, is the point I'm trying to make.

I always kinda knew, but never really appreciated, how Moral Influence is such a key aspect of Elite Control.
7 Dan8267   2017 Sep 7, 7:20pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
TwoScoopsMcGee says

The moral outrage over one guy blathering about Mexicans will be in the Media and the minds of TDS sufferers far longer than Equifax, which will probably end up actually damaging far more families than a rant, is the point I'm trying to make.


That's a valid point, assuming that it's true. There should definitely be far more moral outrage over Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. There should also be more moral outrage over financial crime, which is rampant in the financial industry and banking. There should also be more moral outrage over American prisons, Gitmo, the militarization of the police, and domestic spying. I think that people have just come to accept that they can't change any of these things, so they stop expressing outrage over them.

However, if your point is that the left engages in identity politics over everything else -- and that's a valid point -- I must point out that the right also engages in just as much identity politics. Every time someone denies man-made climate change or its significance, that's identity politics because it's putting "my tribe" over scientific fact. All conservative tribes revolve around identity politics. It's the defining principle of conservatism. What's being conserved is identity.
8 TwoScoopsMcGee   2017 Sep 7, 8:05pm   ↑ like (3)   ↑ dislike (3)     quote        
Dan8267 says
That's a valid point, assuming that it's true. There should definitely be far more moral outrage over Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. There should also be more moral outrage over financial crime, which is rampant in the financial industry and banking. There should also be more moral outrage over American prisons, Gitmo, the militarization of the police, and domestic spying. I think that people have just come to accept that they can't change any of these things, so they stop expressing outrage over them.


Dan8267 says
However, if your point is that the left engages in identity politics over everything else -- and that's a valid point -- I must point out that the right also engages in just as much identity politics.


It's kinda related, but I was thinking more along the lines that framing what is or isn't morally important, is a major key to Control. Around 2008, the Media was focused on framing the Financial Crisis as something that nobody, not even the experts, could have seen coming, as if it were an act of nature more like a hurricane. The only individual they really paid attention to was Maddoff, who had little to do with MBS and the Housing Market, and primarily ripped off other very wealthy people, you couldn't give him your money unless you were already a (multi-) millionaire.
9 errc   2017 Sep 7, 8:22pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
I always kinda knew, but never really appreciated, how Moral Influence is such a key aspect of Elite Control.

------------

I mean, Christians are generally nice people and all, but that they all always support Republicans without question all the time, is pretty much the reason our government is broken.
10 BayAreaObserver   2017 Sep 8, 10:13am   ↑ like (3)   ↑ dislike (3)     quote        
Visiting Equifax site to see if you're a victim can require you to waive lawsuit rights.

If you want to find out if your data might have been exposed, you have to waive your right to sue the Atlanta-based company. We're not making this up. The company has now published a website allowing consumers to input their last six digits of their Social Security numbers to find out.

Like most websites, at the bottom of this new site is a section called "Terms of Use." There, in paragraph 4, is bolded, uppercase text of note. It says that by visiting the site, you agree to waive your right to sue and instead "resolve all disputes by binding, individual arbitration."

"AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL".

Of course, it will be up to the courts to decide whether arbitration agreements are enforceable. The legal standard is whether they're "unconscionable." We'll find out soon enough because class-action lawsuits are already being lodged on behalf of breach victims.

Minutes after we published this post, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman strongly challenged the terms of service in a tweet to his followers:

Whether Equifax victims would come out any better or worse via arbitration versus a class-action is anybody's guess. Unlike arbitration disputes, class actions don't require victims to take on any out-of-pocket expenses.

There is some fine print that allows you to opt out of arbitration if you notify Equifax in writing within 30 days of "accepting this agreement." And the terms also allow you to go to small claims court to individually handle your grievance.

Equifax did not immediately respond for comment.

More: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/09/are-you-an-equifax-breach-victim-you-must-give-up-right-to-sue-to-find-out/
11 KimJongUn   2017 Sep 8, 10:17am   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
BayAreaObserver says
Of course, it will be up to the courts to decide whether arbitration agreements are enforceable.


The fuckers will also have to prove that it was the actual person who entered the last name and 6 digits of SSN and not the hackers who stole it in the first place. The only reliable proof is an actual document signed in front of witnesses. Everything else is BS.
12 WineHorror   2017 Sep 8, 11:15am   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
Technology is pretty cool they said. It will solve all of humanities problems they said.

Tech is no different than armor vs. weapons. It is a constant battle. I think it gets worse and worse as time goes on. Look how they want all health records online. Endless DNA, retina information and fingerprints online.
13 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 11:40am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Dan8267 says
There should also be more moral outrage over American prisons, Gitmo, the militarization of the police, and domestic spying. I think that people have just come to accept that they can't change any of these things, so they stop expressing outrage over them.


I agree. I'm thoroughly outraged.
American prisons. No A/C, heating, TV, or luxuries. It's a prison, not a resort.
Gitmo. Fill it up. Shoot the terrorists or send them to Gitmo. No terrorist must ever get out of Gitmo alive.
Police militarization. Ghettos are not Disneyland. You fight criminals and gangs with overwhelming firepower.
Domestic Spying. Spying is the best way to prevent terrorism and crime. No rights for terrorists and criminals.
14 Heraclitusstudent   2017 Sep 8, 11:45am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
American prisons. No A/C, heating, TV, or luxuries. It's a prison, not a resort.
Gitmo. Fill it up. Shoot the terrorists or send them to Gitmo. No terrorist must ever get out of Gitmo alive.
Police militarization. Ghettos are not Disneyland. You fight criminals and gangs with overwhelming firepower.
Domestic Spying. Spying is the best way to prevent terrorism and crime. No rights for terrorists and criminals.


Strategist is one jovial guy who makes silly jokes at barbecue parties - about nuking NK.
15 lostand confused   2017 Sep 8, 11:45am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Who is watching the watchers?
16 Dan8267   2017 Sep 8, 1:08pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
I agree. I'm thoroughly outraged.
American prisons. No A/C, heating, TV, or luxuries. It's a prison, not a resort.


Your more concerned with revenge on people, many of whom are innocent, than you are with decreasing crime. This is why your opinion does not count.

All evidence shows that brutality increases crime, not decreases it. See this post and the following ones.

Get your revenge fantasies under control. You aren't that noble yourself.
17 Dan8267   2017 Sep 8, 1:15pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Strategist says
Spying is the best way to prevent terrorism and crime.


Spying is also the best way to prevent reform and selectively prosecute people. If the level of domestic spying we had today had been around in the 18th century, America would never have gotten independence. Do you think that would have been a good thing?

We already know exactly what domestic spying does to a society. The Soviet Union demonstrated that very clearly. Do you want America to become another Soviet Union? The intelligence agencies have to prove their worth. When there are no threats, the spies have to torture innocent people into confessing to plotting to commit terrorist acts. This is EXACTLY what happened in the Soviet Union, very often. Is that what you want America to become?
18 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 2:34pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
lostand confused says
Who is watching the watchers?


Dan8267 says
We already know exactly what domestic spying does to a society. The Soviet Union demonstrated that very clearly. Do you want America to become another Soviet Union? The intelligence agencies have to prove their worth. When there are no threats, the spies have to torture innocent people into confessing to plotting to commit terrorist acts. This is EXACTLY what happened in the Soviet Union, very often. Is that what you want America to become?


Here is the type of spying I would support.
We will soon have the technology to track every person every second of the day. That information will only be known to robots and computers. If someone commits lets say a murder, law enforcement will have the right to get that information, and easily identify who was at the murder scene. The killer would be caught right away. This ability will bring crime to a virtual halt, because it's almost impossible to get away with crime.
Why is that bad?
19 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 2:37pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Hey Dan, aren't you supposed to evacuate? If you haven't already, get the hell out of there. Jesus ain't gonna save your ass.
Where is the Captain? Probably stuck in traffic on the way out.
20 drBu   2017 Sep 8, 2:51pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Strategist says
American prisons. No A/C, heating, TV, or luxuries. It's a prison, not a resort.

There are plenty prisons in S. Texas without AC. Someone I know, who is over 70 yrs old, was put into one such prison in Corpus. He has not been convicted yet. Imagine how 70+ year old person feels at 95-100F and 90% humidity
21 drBu   2017 Sep 8, 3:08pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Strategist says
Why is that bad?

Because State will be able to use this technology to frame people someone in position of power dislikes. We see now cops planting drugs on someone they arrested. Why would this not be done via computers?
22 KimJongUn   2017 Sep 8, 3:14pm   ↑ like (3)   ↑ dislike (3)     quote        
Strategist says
Why is that bad?


Because you don't want to get a chair because of some bug in code written by some guy from some bodyshop in Bangalore.
23 Heraclitusstudent   2017 Sep 8, 4:45pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
We will soon have the technology to track every person every second of the day. That information will only be known to robots and computers. If someone commits lets say a murder, law enforcement will have the right to get that information, and easily identify who was at the murder scene. The killer would be caught right away. This ability will bring crime to a virtual halt, because it's almost impossible to get away with crime.
Why is that bad?


You’re not thinking critically.
Do you know why we live in democracy today? Because the elite understands that nothing is more disrupting to a country than a civil war, and democracy is the only system that allows systematic peaceful transition of power.
Remove the threat of violent revolt against the government, and democracy instantly stops making sense. It’s way too messy and people are way to stupid for it to work well.
If you had such a surveillance system, a perfect totalitarian system could be put in place. Any opposition would be instantly eliminated. Non-conformists would be made to conform. All things would be perfect!
If you think a constitution protects you, just look at how many times it is violated and no one says anything.
The wheels of history are turning, and stupidity has consequences. Blind trust has consequences. You should think about it.
24 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 4:48pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
drBu says
Because State will be able to use this technology to frame people someone in position of power dislikes. We see now cops planting drugs on someone they arrested. Why would this not be done via computers?

Happening now anyway. So won't make a difference.

SpecialSnowflake says

Because you don't want to get a chair because of some bug in code written by some guy from some bodyshop in Bangalore.

We can continue to use other means of proving guilt to double check.
25 TwoScoopsMcGee   2017 Sep 8, 5:37pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
WineHorror says
Technology is pretty cool they said. It will solve all of humanities problems they said.
I remember when Silicon Valley was dominated by Libertarians out to let Free Speech Reign. The kind who listened to the "Fuck the FCC" crap put out in the 80s and 90s by Carlin, Zappa, etc.

Now the Inventor of "Hot or Not" Zuckfuck is out to ban political speech, as is "Don't Be Evil" Google/Youtube. Anything the least bit edgy is getting demonitized or put into "limited service", lest it distract from Mascara Application (and thus Maybelline) how-tos. The ISIS videos are of course left alone at the request of Intel Agencies.

Ironically the least policed by SJWs is Microsoft and Yahoo! spaces right now.
26 Dan8267   2017 Sep 8, 6:34pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Strategist says
Here is the type of spying I would support.


That's not what your going to get. Your going to get Soviet Union style spying and arrests. That's how it always plays out. When there are no threats found, the government thugs have to make random innocent people into threats. You are in that pool of random people. Pretending that America, a nation that has indulged itself in genocide, slavery, segregation, forced sterilization, torture, and lethal medical experimentation on unsuspecting civilians is somehow going to be the first nation in history to be completely ethical in domestic spying. That's delusional.
27 Dan8267   2017 Sep 8, 6:35pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
Hey Dan, aren't you supposed to evacuate?


I'm fine. I got balls of steel and a well-built house.
28 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 7:55pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Dan8267 says
Strategist says
Hey Dan, aren't you supposed to evacuate?


I'm fine. I got balls of steel and a well-built house.


I'm glad you are fine. We don't want anything bad happening to you. No point kicking your butt if you are dead.
29 Strategist   2017 Sep 8, 8:05pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Dan8267 says
Strategist says
Here is the type of spying I would support.


That's not what your going to get. Your going to get Soviet Union style spying and arrests. That's how it always plays out. When there are no threats found, the government thugs have to make random innocent people into threats. You are in that pool of random people. Pretending that America, a nation that has indulged itself in genocide, slavery, segregation, forced sterilization, torture, and lethal medical experimentation on unsuspecting civilians is somehow going to be the first nation in history to be completely ethical in domestic spying. That's delusional.


Not any more. Times have changed. The future that I envision in the second half of the century will be the best ever for mankind.
Fossil fuels will be history.
China will be a full democracy.
Islamic nations will start becoming democracies.
Technology will advance to better mankind.
Major diseases like cancer will be cured.
Wars between nations will come to an end.
Crime will deteriorate.
Life will be awesome.
30 anotheraccount   2017 Sep 8, 8:52pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
Fossil fuels will be history.
China will be a full democracy.
Islamic nations will start becoming democracies.
Technology will advance to better mankind.
Major diseases like cancer will be cured.
Wars between nations will come to an end.
Crime will deteriorate.
Life will be awesome.


You are optimistic. So far I see people getting fatter by eating crap while glued to their little screens. AI and hacking are major threat to world stability.
31 Heraclitusstudent   2017 Sep 8, 10:21pm   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Strategist says

Not any more. Times have changed. The future that I envision in the second half of the century will be the best ever for mankind.
Fossil fuels will be history.
China will be a full democracy.
Islamic nations will start becoming democracies.
Technology will advance to better mankind.
Major diseases like cancer will be cured.
Wars between nations will come to an end.
Crime will deteriorate.
Life will be awesome.


They say foolish optimism is # 13 on the list of forces shaping the universe. Just in front of love.
Ignorance and stupidity are #1 and 2 respectively.
32 KimJongUn   2017 Sep 8, 10:34pm   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
Strategist says
Not any more. Times have changed. The future that I envision in the second half of the century will be the best ever for mankind.
Fossil fuels will be history.
China will be a full democracy.
Islamic nations will start becoming democracies.
Technology will advance to better mankind.
Major diseases like cancer will be cured.
Wars between nations will come to an end.
Crime will deteriorate.
Life will be awesome.


Where are the flying cars in that list? They were supposed to be widely available for 17 year now, where the fuck are they?
33 curious2   2017 Sep 8, 11:01pm   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Strategist says
in the second half of the century...Islamic nations will start becoming democracies.


Pakistan is already a democracy, but that hasn't helped. In the second half of the century, more democracies will become Islamic, and some of them have nuclear power (e.g. France, Belgium) and nuclear weapons (e.g., France). The risk of violent conflict between incompatible ideologies (Islam vs everyone else) grows every year, especially when the USA serves KSA and pretends to "respect" Islam.
34 APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   2017 Sep 9, 5:04am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
SpecialSnowflake says
The fuckers will also have to prove that it was the actual person who entered the last name and 6 digits of SSN and not the hackers who stole it in the first place. The only reliable proof is an actual document signed in front of witnesses. Everything else is BS.


This is the kind of shit that exposes corporate counsel as ridiculous, grasping hucksters. Having nothing to think or say about the situation, shit like this makes you want to drink Ballantine Ale for a week and find these goombahs and take a piss on their faces.
35 BlueSardine   2017 Sep 9, 5:20am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Eventually computers will become self-aware.
At that point humankind will become nothing but ants in the farm, born and bred for the amusement of hardware running windows 666...

Strategist says
Here is the type of spying I would support.
We will soon have the technology to track every person every second of the day. That information will only be known to robots and computers. If someone commits lets say a murder, law enforcement will have the right to get that information, and easily identify who was at the murder scene. The killer would be caught right away. This ability will bring crime to a virtual halt, because it's almost impossible to get away with crime.
Why is that bad?
38 zzyzzx   2017 Oct 3, 8:02am   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
http://money.cnn.com/2017/10/02/technology/business/equifax-million-more-impacted/index.html

Equifax breach impacted 2.5 million more people than originally stated
39 KimJongUn   2017 Oct 3, 10:42am   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
zzyzzx says
http://money.cnn.com/2017/10/02/technology/business/equifax-million-more-impacted/index.html

Equifax breach impacted 2.5 million more people than originally stated


At this point it's safe to assume that everybody's info is public now.
40 BayAreaObserver   2017 Oct 4, 1:36am   ↑ like (2)   ↑ dislike (2)     quote        
"At this point it's safe to assume that everybody's info is public now." The Government doesn't care...read below

IRS awards Equifax no-bid, $7.25 million contract after hack. "This is considered a critical service that cannot lapse."

Just because your resume says you exposed the personal data, including Social Security numbers, of some 143 million Americans while practicing unsafe security, it doesn't mean you can't score a multi-million dollar contract with the Internal Revenue Service. That's the case even if your name is Equifax and you're being contracted by the IRS to "verify taxpayer identity" to combat fraud.

The $7.25 million no-bid contract to Equifax was posted the last day of the fiscal year, Saturday, on the government's Federal Business Opportunities database. It was awarded Friday, three weeks after Equifax announced what Ars has described as "very possibly the worst leak of personal info ever." According to the posting, Equifax will "assist in ongoing identity verification and validations" for the IRS.

The contract was a "sole source order." That means the IRS has determined that Equifax was the only company deemed capable of performing the contract, according to Politico. The IRS, which did not immediately respond for comment, said in the contract posting that "this is considered a critical service that cannot lapse."

According to the contract posting:

This action was to establish an order for third party data services from Equifax to verify taxpayer identity and to assist in ongoing identity verification and validations needs of the Service.

Equifax, a credit reporting bureau, exposed a breathtaking amount of highly sensitive data to hackers—full names, Social Security numbers, birthdates, addresses, and, in some cases, driver's license numbers. That's the information that banks, insurance companies, and other businesses use to confirm that consumers are who they claim to be.

More: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/10/irs-awards-equifax-7-25m-taxpayer-identity-contract-weeks-after-hack/

Is this more of the MAGA and Winning we keep hearing about ?
41 errc   2017 Oct 4, 4:45am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Cleaning the swamp
42 anonymous   2017 Oct 4, 7:10am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
Heraclitusstudent says
Strategist is one jovial guy who makes silly jokes at barbecue parties - about nuking NK.


I'd strongly consider it if I had access to the red button.
43 anonymous   2017 Oct 4, 7:11am   ↑ like (1)   ↑ dislike (1)     quote        
Booger says

44 TwoScoopsMcGee   2017 Oct 4, 8:22am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
BayAreaObserver says
The contract was a "sole source order." That means the IRS has determined that Equifax was the only company deemed capable of performing the contract, according to Politico. The IRS, which did not immediately respond for comment, said in the contract posting that "this is considered a critical service that cannot lapse."


I imagine the only one who possesses Equifax records is Equifax. Since the IRS is a collections as well as enforcement organization...
45 HEY YOU   2017 Oct 4, 11:03am   ↑ like (0)   ↑ dislike (0)     quote        
If info is use to fuck with some - Be careful who you piss off.

Equifax Inc Corporate Office & Headquarters
1550 Peachtree St. NW Atlanta GA 30309

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