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The Secretive Family Making Billions from the Opioid Crisis

By someone else following x   2017 Oct 21, 10:23am 1,472 views   23 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a12775932/sackler-family-oxycontin/?src=patrick.net
The descendants of Mortimer and Raymond Sackler, a pair of psychiatrist brothers from Brooklyn, are members of a billionaire clan with homes scattered across Connecticut, London, Utah, Gstaad, the Hamptons, and, especially, New York City. It was not until 2015 that they were noticed by Forbes, which added them to the list of America’s richest families. The magazine pegged their wealth, shared among twenty heirs, at a conservative $14 billion. (Descendants of Arthur Sackler, Mortimer and Raymond’s older brother, split off decades ago and are mere multi-millionaires.) To a remarkable degree, those who share in the billions appear to have abided by an oath of omertà: Never comment publicly on the source of the family’s wealth.

That may be because the greatest part of that $14 billion fortune tallied by Forbes came from OxyContin, the narcotic painkiller regarded by many public-health experts as among the most dangerous products ever sold on a mass scale. Since 1996, when the drug was brought to market by Purdue Pharma, the American branch of the Sacklers’ pharmaceutical empire, more than two hundred thousand people in the United States have died from overdoses of OxyContin and other prescription painkillers.




#drugs
1   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (30)   2017 Oct 21, 10:27am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Why does America hate Free! Enterprise!?
2   justme   ignore (0)   2017 Oct 21, 10:35am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

What happened is that the War on Drugs only applies to poor people. Big and wealthy players such as Purdue Pharma and HSBC bank (money laundering drug money) will not get shot at nor prosecuted.

I can guarantee you that within these corporations there have been prosecutable criminal activities -- but the FBI is too busy investigating the "Muh Russia" canard rather than actually doing something useful. Jeff Sessions was supposed to ba a law-and-order kind of Attorney General, was he not? Much better than Eric Holder was, right?
3   mell   ignore (1)   2017 Oct 21, 1:47pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They invented a damn good painkiller, if not the best. Usually with such great effectiveness comes great side-effects such as addiction. But it has been and is being used successfully for some of the worst temporary pains, so why shouldn't they profit from it. Americans are pretty much addicted to everything these days, it's not the government's role to nanny their people or tell them what they can and cannot take. The war on drugs has failed and so will the war on oxycontin. If you want to fuck up your life there are many other avenues and you will find a way. Of course the hypocrisy here is the war on illegal drugs which should be abolished as well while big pharma makes big $$ with "legal" drugs - that distinction is asinine.
4   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Oct 21, 1:56pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They don't call it filthy rich for nothing. Shrinks reaffirm the adage that the best way to become wealthy is dealing drugs, religion or politics. Fuck the collateral damage.
5   HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2017 Oct 21, 2:01pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote        

Ceffer says
Fuck the collateral damage.

New Republican motto?
6   Feux Follets   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 12, 2:01am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Public Health Win ! Purdue Pharma Has Released A New Type Of Oxycontin To Help Ease The Pain Of Losing A Loved One To Oxycontin !

As the tragic opioid crisis in our country claims more and more lives every day, an increasing number of Americans are dealing with the anguish of watching a friend or family member with a painkiller addiction succumb to a fatal overdose.

Thankfully, one of the most influential opioid manufacturers in the world is stepping up to help solve this epidemic: Purdue Pharma has released a new type of Oxycontin to help ease the pain of losing a loved one to Oxycontin.

Good on Purdue for tackling this devastating issue head-on.

The pharmaceutical giant is marketing the new Oxycontin for Bereavement, which contains the same amount of oxycodone as its original Oxycontin medication, as a continuous-relief solution for the intense pain that comes with watching a loved one’s life deteriorate and come to an end as a result of painkiller addiction.

Purdue has already sent reps to hospitals nationwide, instructing doctors to look for signs of grief and depression in patients who have found their son’s lifeless body after he ingested a lethal amount of Oxycontin, and prescribe a dose of the Oxycontin for Bereavement to dull the intense emotional trauma.

This is incredible news. It’s fantastic to see a big pharmaceutical company that truly cares about its impact on society.

“Big-pharma lobbying and overprescription have sadly created an addiction crisis where people are losing parents, siblings, children, and friends to opioids every day,” said Jonathan Sackler, a member of the board of directors at Purdue.

“If your family member tragically passes away from snorting a huge dose of crushed-up painkillers after gradually ruining all their relationships chasing the high of Oxycontin, let Oxycontin for Bereavement help you manage your grief.”

With hundreds of fatal overdoses on drugs like Oxycontin, heroin, and fentanyl happening every day, the toll that the opioid crisis has taken on our nation cannot be overstated.

Purdue’s new Oxycontin drug is an enormous win for public health—and shows that Purdue Pharma is a company that genuinely wants the best for the customers it serves. So thank you, Purdue, for understanding the problem and caring enough to help.

http://www.clickhole.com/article/public-health-win-purdue-pharma-has-released-new-t-7530
7   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 12, 4:04am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

mell says
They invented a damn good painkiller, if not the best. Usually with such great effectiveness comes great side-effects such as addiction. But it has been and is being used successfully for some of the worst temporary pains, so why shouldn't they profit from it.


They didn't invent any new painkiller. Oxycontin is simply time release oxycodone which has been around since 1916. What they did invent was a massive marketing campaign to doctors and patients. Knowing damn well oxy was addictive as hell. Doctors were bombarded with non stop ad campaigns about how pain was no longer acceptable and failure to prescribe oxycontin was pretty much malpractice. Patients were extensively marketed the idea that oxy was safe as aspirin but much more effective.

Purdue got one hell of a return on their advertising and lobbying dollars. Now everyone else is paying to clean up the mess. Profits to the investors, the public pays the losses. The libertarian/tea party/republican wet dream come true.
8   Hassan_Rouhani   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 12, 5:08pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I'm getting confused here: aren't access to moar drugs a good thing? I mean, it's fashionable to be against war on drugs now, so what's exactly the problem with opioids? People getting addicted, becoming unproductivea and (some of them) dying from overdoses? And this is different from crack/meth/heroin exactly how?
9   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 12, 5:14pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
I'm getting confused here: aren't access to moar drugs a good thing? I mean, it's fashionable to be against war on drugs now, so what's exactly the problem with opioids? People getting addicted, becoming unproductivea and (some of them) dying from overdoses? And this is different from crack/meth/heroin exactly how?


Exactly my point. Although to be fair the game has been rigged against weed etc. (being illegal) and pro big pharma drugs. No doubt BP used their lobbyists and money to buy time against competition such as weed. However to label opioids as evil and weed as good completely misses the point. Every drug has a certain characteristic and its use cases, and opiods are extremely (if not the most) effective short-term solutions for pain management. Weed is undoubtedly safer, but both should be allowed on the market. Same for small (medicinal) doses of heroin (used in cough medicine then replaced by codeine et al) or cocaine. If you want to ruin your life by fostering your addictive personality you will find a way, legal or illegal, so prohibition does hardly work here and enforcement is extremely costly with little to none ROI.
10   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 6:48am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
I'm getting confused here: aren't access to moar drugs a good thing? I mean, it's fashionable to be against war on drugs now, so what's exactly the problem with opioids? People getting addicted, becoming unproductivea and (some of them) dying from overdoses? And this is different from crack/meth/heroin exactly how?


Because doctors didn't prescribe millions of doses of crack after being bombarded with advertising that crack was safe and effective for routine pain control. Until Purdue started it's marketing blitz on how time release opioids weren't addictive opioids were pretty much limited to people with intractable pain from a terminal illness.

War on drugs is a total straw man. No one is saying access to drugs is good. You just made that up. The war on drugs is a massive failure, probably the biggest in history. You have to address demand, not supply. As with illegal aliens, as long as there is demand then there will be supply. When the US starts spending the untold billions from the war on drugs for treatment then there will be progress. Countries that have recognized this are having very good results.

mell says
If you want to ruin your life by fostering your addictive personality you will find a way, legal or illegal, so prohibition does hardly work here and enforcement is extremely costly with little to none ROI.


Total bullshit. Millions of people that would never have had a problem found themselves very unexpectedly addicted to an oxycontin prescription.

mell says
opiods are extremely (if not the most) effective short-term solutions for pain management


General anesthesia is the most effective short term solution for pain management. Purdue didn't advertise oxy for short term pain management. They advertised it for general pain relief like Tylenol or Ibuprofen. No one should have had more than a couple days prescription unless they were being managed by a pain specialist. Which is what is being done now. It will take many, many years to clean up the mess. Purdue took the profits, the taxpayers own the losses.
11   komputodo   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 13, 7:17am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
Purdue took the profits, the taxpayers own the losses.


That is the American way!
12   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 10:30am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

bob2356 says
Total bullshit. Millions of people that would never have had a problem found themselves very unexpectedly addicted to an oxycontin prescription.


Unexpectedly? lol what bs. If you happen to know a few that got addicted the history of addiction goes far back and they were never used in the prescribed quantity (but much more) and much longer than prescribed. Yes purdue underreported the addiction risk but that has been corrected. That has nothing to do with the topic of generally legalizing drugs or not.

bob2356 says
General anesthesia is the most effective short term solution for pain management. Purdue didn't advertise oxy for short term pain management. They advertised it for general pain relief like Tylenol or Ibuprofen. No one should have had more than a couple days prescription unless they were being managed by a pain specialist. Which is what is being done now. It will take many, many years to clean up the mess. Purdue took the profits, the taxpayers own the losses.


It was never marketed as being equivalent to tylenol or ibuprofen, what hyperbole. You can make the case for high fines for purdue to give some of the profits back but again, it has nothing to do with the topic. Far more people ruin their lives with alcohol and weed, gambling or anything else that can get people addicted, who is being held responsible for the "losses" to society? Can't have it both ways.
13   justme   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 13, 11:10am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Trump was talking about death penalty for drug traffickers last week. Is the death penalty going to apply to the Sacker family and Purdue Pharma executives and owners/investors, or only the usual target: Poor brown people?
14   HEYYOU   ignore (13)   2018 Mar 13, 11:18am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says
Why does America hate Free! Enterprise!?


Let me put in my 0.1% worth.
Bail me out,UNREGULATED Markets, "Corporations are People" Capitalism.
15   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 11:54am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

mell says
Unexpectedly? lol what bs. If you happen to know a few that got addicted the history of addiction goes far back and they were never used in the prescribed quantity (but much more) and much longer than prescribed


You know this how? You have personally researched everyone that became addicted to oxy? That was ambitious. You will publish the results when? As of right now 4 out of 5 heroin users in the US started with prescription oxy..

mell says
Yes purdue underreported the addiction risk but that has been corrected.


They also spent 200-300 million a year promoting oxy mostly to convince doctors that oxy was not addictive. The FDA approved oxy with NO research on how addictive or prone to abuse oxy was. The FDA even approved and insert saying oxy was LESS addictive than other painkillers. The only research was by Dr Russell Portenoy who said opioids are a “gift from nature". He also decried the reticence among clinicians to administer such narcotics for chronic pain, claiming that it was indicative of “opiophobia,” and suggesting that concerns about addiction and abuse amounted to a “medical myth.” BTW Portenoy was funded by Purdue. In 1997, the American Academy of Pain Medicine and the American Pain Society published a statement regarding the use of opioids to treat chronic pain. The statement was written by a committee chaired by Dr. J. David Haddox, a paid speaker for Purdue. Coincidence you think?

mell says

It was never marketed as being equivalent to tylenol or ibuprofen, what hyperbole.


Hyperbole? Go look up Purdue marketing, especially the late 90's. Heavy emphasis on things like arthritis, back pain, sports injuries, fibromyalgia which at the time were treated with NSIADS unless really severe. It was marketed for MODERATE to severe pain.

mell says
Far more people ruin their lives with alcohol and weed, gambling or anything else that can get people addicted, who is being held responsible for the "losses" to society? Can't have it both ways.


How many prescriptions were written for alcohol, weed, gambling, or anything else that can get people addicted? Can't have it both ways.

mell says
That has nothing to do with the topic of generally legalizing drugs or not.


Oxy is legal so what are you talking about the topic of generally legalizing drugs? The topic was the Sackler's making huge amounts of money off of deceptive and very aggressive advertising of a product that should have been much more carefully researched by people not on the Purdue payroll.

I have been advocating for decriminalizing drugs and using the money spent on enforcement for addiction and mental health treatment since the 70's. Decriminalizing isn't legalizing.
16   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 12:09pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

bob2356 says
How many prescriptions were written for alcohol, weed, gambling, or anything else that can get people addicted? Can't have it both ways.


You can get a prescription for as much weed as you want for quite a while now. I had one. Just walk into one of those weed MDs clinics and talk about pain for 2 minutes.



bob2356 says
You know this how? You have personally researched everyone that became addicted to oxy? That was ambitious. You will publish the results when? As of right now 4 out of 5 heroin users in the US started with prescription oxy..


And with weed before. And milk before.
17   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 12:36pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

mell says
You can get a prescription for as much weed as you want for quite a while now. I had one. Just walk into one of those weed MDs clinics and talk about pain for 2 minutes.


Not for very long at all and not in that many states yet. How many people with a pot script are using heroin now? How much is heroin usage up in the legalized pot states? Drug (all drugs) and alcohol use in teens is down something like 20% in CO since pot legalization.

You could try defending your position instead of just skipping from non sequitur to non sequitur. Just a thought.
18   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Mar 13, 12:53pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

bob2356 says
mell says
You can get a prescription for as much weed as you want for quite a while now. I had one. Just walk into one of those weed MDs clinics and talk about pain for 2 minutes.


Not for very long at all and not in that many states yet. How many people with a pot script are using heroin now? How much is heroin usage up in the legalized pot states? Drug (all drugs) and alcohol use in teens is down something like 20% in CO since pot legalization.

You could try defending your position instead of just skipping from non sequitur to non sequitur. Just a thought.


Every state begins to see declines in opioids as soon as they go against Trump and Republicans and allow access to Cannabis.

That position is indefensible, so you will continue to see avoiding answering the questions and denying the facts. It’s fucked up, and oddly something you will only ever hear from Republicans, or Republicans ashamed to admit they are Republicans so they call themselves “Libertarians”. The hypocrisy is mind blowing
19   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 1:25pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (2)   quote        

You guys just stop being emotional and use logic instead. With very few exceptions there are no good and bad drugs. It depends on the use case and the dosis. Vilifying oxycontin and glorifying weed is asinine. Both should be legal and advertisable.
20   TwoScoopsOfDragonEnergy   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 13, 1:40pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote        

The cannabis will free the world, Green the Earth, and help humans transcend time into the 27th Century as they meld their minds into the Aether of the Universe.

The bud singularity is almost upon us!

By the way, you got any chips?
21   Feux Follets   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 18, 2:46am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Someone’s Getting Fired !

Some Hapless Bozo At This Opioid Company Accidentally Implemented A Business Model That Incentivizes Profit Over Public Safety !

We wouldn’t want to be the clumsy Purdue Pharma employee responsible for this seriously major blunder right now, because they’re definitely about to get fired:

Some hapless bozo at one of America’s biggest opioid manufacturers accidentally implemented a business model that incentivizes profit over public safety.

It’s tough to see Purdue making a comeback from a PR disaster as embarrassing as this.

By the time Purdue Pharma realized that it’d made the humiliating mistake of prioritizing its company’s bottom line over human lives due to an employee’s careless screwup, it was too late.

The company had already raked in billions of dollars in profits selling highly addictive prescription opioids at the expense of the American public’s health.

Every last Purdue executive has got to be in full-on damage-control mode after this careless oversight!

Although Purdue has announced that it’s taking steps to identify and properly discipline the buffoon responsible for mistakenly designing its marketing, distribution, and production operations to maximize revenue and increase its shareholders’ stock value even though it meant directly contributing to the explosive growth of opioid overdoses across the U.S., it may be a long time before this company’s reputation fully recovers.

A company as big as Purdue should be able to prevent goofs like this from happening. Just yikes.

It’s going to be pretty tough for Purdue Pharma to live down this big-time mess.

You have to wonder how someone so incompetent that they unwittingly directed the pharmaceutical company’s resources into making billions of dollars selling deadly painkillers while turning a blind eye to the countless lives their product destroyed even got hired in the first place.

Guess it’s safe to say whoever the lummox is that’s responsible for this blooper won’t be working in the pharmaceutical industry for much longer !

http://www.clickhole.com/article/someones-getting-fired-some-hapless-bozo-opioid-co-7553
22   Feux Follets   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 18, 2:52am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

mell says
With very few exceptions there are no good and bad drugs. It depends on the use case and the dosis.


With very few exceptions there are no good and bad cops.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad guns.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad people.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad religions.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad anything.

It's only our perception and personal bias that determines good and bad.
23   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 18, 9:28am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Feux Follets says
mell says
With very few exceptions there are no good and bad drugs. It depends on the use case and the dosis.


With very few exceptions there are no good and bad cops.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad guns.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad people.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad religions.

With very few exceptions there are no good and bad anything.

It's only our perception and personal bias that determines good and bad.


Sola dosis facit venenum.




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