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1   TwoScoopsPlissken   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 9, 7:45am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Wow. They're all about lending money, helping landlords sell to other landlords, or weird Eurocrap Communal Living.

What I want to see is "Ha! Our proprietary legal trick to build UP despite Landlord Oligarch density laws!"

Seriously, the startups aren't about actually creating new housing.
2   Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 9, 8:07am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

TwoScoopsMcGee says
Wow. They're all about lending money, helping landlords sell to other landlords, or weird Eurocrap Communal Living.

What I want to see is "Ha! Our proprietary legal trick to build UP despite Landlord Oligarch density laws!"

Seriously, the startups aren't about actually creating new housing.


Making it easier for one person to buy a home only makes it harder for someone else to buy that home.
The only way to help everyone buy a home is to build more homes. There are lots of home builders only too eager to build homes. Just allow them to build.
3   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (28)   2017 Nov 9, 8:09am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

The only problem is that housing in underpriced. More flipping and more realtors and more low doc, no doc mortgage underwriting will fix all that.
4   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 9, 10:00am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

TwoScoopsMcGee says
Seriously, the startups aren't about actually creating new housing.


The article does state:
Some are launching startups focused on creating new housing units.

Starcity is creating new housing by buying and renovating abandoned buildings and converting them into long-term rental units.The San Francisco-based startup buys defunct hotels, vacant commercial buildings and other unused properties, renovates them, obtains the proper city permits, and turns them into community housing, where residents have their own rooms but share common spaces. So far, the company has moved renters into two buildings in San Francisco and has another six under construction, including one expected to open in Oakland early next year.


Granted, razing those places and building high rises instead would be way better, but unless someone gives them a bunch of money, I don't see that happening.
5   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 9, 10:08am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

zzyzzx says
unless someone gives them a bunch of money, I don't see that happening.


That's what SV giants should be doing IMO.
6   Feux Follets   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 4, 2:38pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

The future of startups isn't in New York or California — and I'm investing $150 million to prove it. Steve Case*

•This post is part of Business Insider's ongoing series on Better Capitalism.**

•AOL cofounder Steve Case thinks we're at the beginning of a new area of American entrepreneurship where the US coasts are less important than they used to be.

•Case's investment firm Revolution is putting $150 million toward startups in overlooked American cities through the Rise of the Rest Seed Fund.

•Revolution has invested more than $1 billion outside of Silicon Valley.

A company that creates visibility systems for self-driving vehicles. An entrepreneur building high-tech greenhouses to cut distance from the produce supply chain. Sensors that drive energy savings by controlling air and heat in commercial buildings.

You might assume these efforts were born in a Palo Alto garage or a Cambridge classroom or a New York City co-working space. But you would be wrong. These three enterprises—SEEVA in Seattle, WA; AppHarvest in Pikeville, KY; and 75F in Burnsville, MN, respectively—represent what I believe is the future of innovation and what I have long called the Rise of the Rest.

My investment firm, Revolution, has always invested based on the notion that great companies can start and scale anywhere. But that wasn't enough to move the needle. 75% of all venture capital dollars go to just three states—CA, NY, and MA. So in 2014, we hopped on a bus to tour and draw attention to startup ecosystems across America.

33 cities and 8,000 miles later, we have learned quite a bit about the innovative spirit of this country and what it takes to create the entrepreneurial communities necessary to maintain America's economic leadership.

More: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-future-of-startups-isnt-in-new-york-or-california-2018-2

Related: High-profile investors like Jeff Bezos, Ray Dalio, and Meg Whitman are flocking to a $150 million fund nurturing startups in overlooked American cities. http://www.businessinsider.com/rise-of-the-rest-steve-case-jd-vance-2018-1

* Steve Case is the co-founder of AOL, the chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC, and the author of the best-selling book "The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur's Vision of the Future."

** Better Capitalism Website: http://www.businessinsider.com/better-capitalism




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