forgot password / register

reset password

register

patrick.net

 

#housing


#housing #investing #politics #random more»
778,259 comments by 11,466 users, 3 online now: Patrick, Tenpoundbass, YesYNot
new post
« prev   housing   next »

5
0

Difficulty in finding sales price history for houses

By Patrick following x   2017 Nov 12, 12:55pm 293 views   16 comments   watch   quote     share  


#housing

I've been thinking that the advertised rates of appreciation for houses are actually far lower than the press constantly reports. To prove this, I need a data set of sale prices the the same address over time. Such data used to be more available, but now I cannot find it anyway. Even Zillow seems to hide it where they used to publish it, giving only tax history, not sale price history any more.

Anyone know where I can find this data?
1 APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   ignore (5)   2017 Nov 12, 1:06pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

You need to drill into the discharges and use the references to the book and page to see sale price and detail on size of mortgage and downpayment.

A snap if it's one property. If you're looking for regional data, this is work unless there is a service that pre-processes and categorizes data by cuts that matter to you.

Depending on the registry, you can use the address referenced in the grantors and grantees indexes as well but knowing when a note got discharged - and if there were subordinations, etc. - can tell you a lot about the finances around a property.

In this game, the sex, violence and car chases are in the margin notes.Kiss the registry clerks on the way out.
2 goat   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 1:19pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Patrick says

#housing
Even Zillow seems to hide it where they used to publish it, giving only tax history, not sale price history any more.



I noticed that they limit how far back they go. I used to commonly see records all the way back to the 70's for taxes and sale prices, but starting maybe a year ago or so, they only show recent info. I was pretty bummed about that.

Anyway, I too want this data. I want a big old huge db of it so that I can run analytics on it until I puke.
3 anon_7de21   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 2:18pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Patrick says
I need a data set of sale prices the the same address over time. Such data used to be more available, but now I cannot find it anyway.


Does your county clerk or tax office have that information available online. In my county, as long as I know the Lot and Block numbers, I can pull up all financial transactions (deeds, mortgages, liens, etc.) on a property.
4 APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   ignore (5)   2017 Nov 12, 2:46pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

anon_7de21 says
In my county


Locality is key. Some counties' land registries are online and complete and trustworthy.

Some, they're off line and the worst are offline and the book and page records are unreliable.
5 WookieMan   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 2:49pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

I have Chicago MLS data only, but I can go back to 1980. Chicago as long as I've known has been a pretty vanilla market, so not sure what I have access to helps with what you're looking for. Maybe in the high end neighborhoods if you're looking for some correlation to the Bay area.
6 Patrick   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 3:13pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Like goat, I also want big data sets I can run analytics on till I puke.
7 Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 12, 4:09pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Patrick says
I've been thinking that the advertised rates of appreciation for houses are actually far lower than the press constantly reports. To prove this, I need a data set of sale prices the the same address over time. Such data used to be more available, but now I cannot find it anyway. Even Zillow seems to hide it where they used to publish it, giving only tax history, not sale price history any more.


That's what the Case Shiller does. Just use that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Case–Shiller_index
The Standard & Poor's Case–Shiller Home Price Indices are repeat-sales house price indices for the United States. There are multiple Case–Shiller home price indices: A national home price index, a 20-city composite index, a 10-city composite index, and twenty individual metro area indices. These indices are calculated and kept monthly by Standard & Poor's, with data points calculated for the time period of January 1987 through the present. The indices kept by Standard and Poor are normalized to have a value of 100 in January 2000.
8 justme   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 4:15pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Redfin has some sale price data, but it tends to be available only for houses that are active listings.
9 Fucking White Male   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 12, 6:39pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

I used to be able to get everything on Los Angeles area sales. I was particularly interested in West LA, Culver City, and Burbank as these had all been bastions of middle class living in LA with decent public schools and affordable homes until around 2002 ish. Before I ever came to Pat.net I was posting around a few local LA message boards and used that info in 2006ish to note that people were paying 3x what homes had been selling for less than 10 years prior.

Also around that time I noted that many listings had the price history scrubbed. Eventually...and I can't remember when...a Redfin realtor posted that some realtors were removing the price histories from their listings. This was astonishing to me, and actually led to arguments with other posters insisting that prices had never been where I claimed them to be. Prices in West LA had been as low as $175K-190K in the mid to late 90's for small dated homes and down into the $130k-180k range in Burbank for the same time period(Culver City was always $225K+). Imagine my surprise when I researched some of the same neighborhoods and couldn't find a sale between when they were built in the 1950's until 2002+ !

Anyway, that may explain a small part of my salty posting style when I came to Patrick.net.
10 Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 12, 7:14pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Fucking White Male says
I used to be able to get everything on Los Angeles area sales. I was particularly interested in West LA, Culver City, and Burbank as these had all been bastions of middle class living in LA with decent public schools and affordable homes until around 2002 ish. Before I ever came to Pat.net I was posting around a few local LA message boards and used that info in 2006ish to note that people were paying 3x what homes had been selling for less than 10 years prior.

Also around that time I noted that many listings had the price history scrubbed. Eventually...and I can't remember when...a Redfin realtor posted that some realtors were removing the price histories from their listings. This was astonishing to me, and actually led to arguments with other posters insisting that prices had never been where I claimed them to be. Prices in West LA had been as low as $175K-190K in the mid to late 90's for small dated homes and down into the $130k-180k range in Burbank for the same time period(...


The information is always available as public records through the county recorders office. Could computerization be the reason for lapses in previous data? Keep in mind, the most recent data is most relevant to any research project.
11 Fucking White Male   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 12, 8:19pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Strategist says
The information is always available as public records through the county recorders office. Could computerization be the reason for lapses in previous data? Keep in mind, the most recent data is most relevant to any research project.


I agree and the days are loooong gone that homes will be those prices.

However it is relevant in discussions with the realtorbots who slobber up the revisionist history. Histories attached to sold properties online are easy to access. The County Recorders office is not.
12 justme   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 12, 8:23pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Fucking White Male says
Histories attached to sold properties online are easy to access. The County Recorders office is not.


Exactly, all County Recorder websites I have seen have very cumbersome query interfaces, AND bad presentation of the results.
13 HEY YOU   ignore (6)   2017 Nov 12, 11:46pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

We use to do it but we don't now.
Our hidden agenda is none of your business.
14 anon_ae030   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 13, 12:17am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

justme says
Redfin has some sale price data, but it tends to be available only for houses that are active listings.

A handful of those in any given area would offer a reasonable insight for most people, which is generally all that matters for most folks. They've clearly shot up substantially in the last 7 or so years. Great for me personally, a major problem for younger people looking to own a home.
15 anon_a54f8   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 13, 7:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Fucking White Male says
Strategist says
The information is always available as public records through the county recorders office. Could computerization be the reason for lapses in previous data? Keep in mind, the most recent data is most relevant to any research project.


I agree and the days are loooong gone that homes will be those prices.

However it is relevant in discussions with the realtorbots who slobber up the revisionist history. Histories attached to sold properties online are easy to access. The County Recorders office is not.


As one old timer to another- it is remarkable how much west side prices changed in the last (now 20) years. As much as I hated hearing it, a lot of people truly were "priced out forever".
16 zzyzzx   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 13, 7:16am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote        

Historic home prices for any particular piece of real estate is publically available on the internet for properties in Maryland. You just have to go to the states website and look at the individual property.

Comment as anon_f02b0 or log in at top of page:

users   about   suggestions   source code   contact  
topics   best comments   comment jail   old posts by year  
10 reasons it's a terrible time to buy  
8 groups who lie about the housing market  
37 bogus arguments about housing  
get a free bumper sticker:

top   bottom   home