Islam and Identity Politics in Indonesia
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Islam and Identity Politics in Indonesia

By BayAreaObserver following x   2017 Nov 18, 8:06am 619 views   13 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


Rising Islamic conservatism, especially among youths, is a worrying trend for Indonesia.

From militancy in the southern Philippines to hardline preachers taking shelter in Malaysia, politicized forms of conservative Islam are on the rise in Southeast Asia. Encouraged by governments and local elites who seek to draw legitimacy from local traditions, extremist thought is spreading among young people across the region. Nowhere is this more evident and more worrying than in Indonesia, the region’s largest and most populous Muslim state, home to 260 million people, 87 percent of whom are Sunni Muslims.

A young democracy with a history of religious tolerance toward its Christian and Hindu minorities, Indonesia has nevertheless had to wage a long battle against Sunni Islamist militants. After Indonesia’s Detachment 88 counterterrorism unit dismantled Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) and other homegrown al-Qaeda-affiliated networks following the 2002 Bali bombing, a period of relative calm followed. However the struggle has reignited in recent years thanks to the influence of Islamic State (ISIS), which inspired many Southeast Asian militants to return to violence.

Indonesian militants have fought in Syria and alongside Filipino fighters on the southern Filipino island of Mindanao, after they were invited to the area by Isnilon Hapilon, then the Islamic State’s emir in Southeast Asia (he was killed recently in fighting for control of the Filipino city of Marawi). But the active militants form only a small part of a much larger tide of rising religious conservativism in Indonesia that is worrying the authorities there, who see it as a threat to the country’s founding secular ideology, “Pancasila.” President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and his government have repeatedly warned about the creeping influence of radical Islamic thought among student organizations and in campus activities.

As elsewhere, social media and the spread of “fake news” is being blamed for an increase in “identity politics” Indonesian style. This can mean something different to Indonesians than Westerners, however, who associate the term with campaigns by underprivileged groups for social reforms. In the context of Indonesian affairs, it has come to stand for discrimination along the lines of religion and ethnicity by and against members of the indigenous Muslim majority. Appeals to identity in Indonesia are still seen through the prism of Dutch colonialism, which split the archipelago’s diverse population into a three-tiered racial classification. At the top where Europeans, in the middle “foreign orientals,” and at the bottom was everyone else; the “pribumi” or indigenous people. In a Muslim majority country, part of identifying oneself with the “pribumi” means adhering strongly to Islamic norms, which themselves have been affected by the puritanical forms of Islam being exported from the Middle East since the 1980s.

Demands by politicians purporting to represent “true” Indonesians, therefore, often mix pro-Islamic sentiments with allusions to the economic gap between different ethnicities and religions in Indonesia (such as the perceived greater prosperity of the Indonesian Chinese minority, many of whom are also Christians). Thus the political appeals to religious and racial prejudice, which can actually serve as a platform for demands to introduce positive discrimination in favor of “indigenous” Indonesians (who tend to have a Sunni Muslim background) similar to neighboring Malaysia’s dubiously effective “Bumiputera” policies.

Religious radicalism often seems to go hand in hand with a fear of economic loss to foreign, non-Muslim workers. According to another recent survey by the Jakarta-based think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), young people in Indonesia display a strong xenophobic tendency. The survey found that 77.7 percent of Indonesians aged between 17 and 29 years of age thought that foreign workers negatively harmed Indonesia’s economy and took away local people’s jobs. This was despite the fact that Indonesia has fewer foreign workers than its neighbors Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, and that it is currently enjoying a period of good economic growth.


More: https://thediplomat.com/2017/11/islam-and-identity-politics-in-indonesia/

See Also:


http://patrick.net/post/1309738/2017-09-06-isis-in-southeast-asia-get-ready-to-send-your-kids-and-grandkids-to-the-new-vietnams

http://patrick.net/post/1292241/2016-06-15-after-mideast-will-the-saudi-wahhabi-nexus-destabilize-east-asia




#Islam #SoutheastAsia
1   HEY YOU   ignore (7)   2017 Nov 18, 11:24am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

How many Christian Republican buy/enjoy imports from Muslim nations?
Anyone ever hear of palm oil?
Nothing like making Republican fools look like fools.
2   TwoScoopsPlissken   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 18, 4:24pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

There's not going to be any Vietnam in Indonesia.

The worst are found in Aceh province, unsurprisingly it's the most "Arabized" part of Indonesia. There are plenty of Christians, Hindus, and "nominal" Muslims in Indonesia.

The Great Jihad has petered out. The Gulf Financing is drying up.

There will be some Anti-Chinese violence, just like there always has been, as the Chinese are the Jews of SE Asia and there will always be lazy, jealous bitches anywhere.

By the Power of the Orb of Cofeve, and demographics, the Great Jihad is winding down. The bulk of the problem will be self-radicalized Muslims and violent Arab criminal gangs in the West. Most of the explosions in Sweden you hear about is Nafras and Middle Easterners assassinating/intimidating each other over drugs/cigs/prostitution.
3   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 19, 2:30am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

"There's not going to be any Vietnam in Indonesia".

Don't rule that one out just yet, same with most any of the countries in Southeast Asia. Rome wasn't built in a day as the old saying goes.


4   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 19, 2:37am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Johor's Malays tilt towards conservative Islam: Survey.

Johorean Zakiah Mat Lila has never said "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Deepavali" to her neighbours. She will vote only for Muslims and applauds strict Islamic laws, such as cutting off the hands of thieves and caning fornicators.

"I say yes to hudud laws for Muslims. Do it like in Saudi Arabia, nobody will dare to steal if they know their hands might get chopped off," the 50-year-old coffee vendor told The Sunday Times in Mersing, a coastal town in eastern Johor.

Madam Zakiah represents a growing conservative voice in modern and multicultural Johor, Malaysia's southernmost state, where a recent controversy over a "Muslim-only" launderette had courted a royal rebuke and sparked furore online.

In fact, her views mirrored the findings of a maiden survey commissioned by ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute on the role of Islam and its governance in the state. The results, released on Nov 10, revealed that Johoreans, particularly Malays, are becoming more religious if not more conservative.

The Johor survey was commissioned as part of the institute's study on social, economic and political trends in the state. The previous survey in 2013 did not examine religion but attitudes towards governance and economy, Iskandar Malaysia and Singapore.

ISEAS fellow Norshahril Saat said such conservatism was previously associated only with Malays living in the rural Malay belt states of Kelantan, Terengganu and Kedah.

"Johor is more developed economically and more urban than the other states, so we would expect them (the residents) to be more modern and to think of Islam as a more progressive religion," he told The Sunday Times. "The Johor case confirms the findings that there is rising Islamic revivalist thinking in contemporary Malaysia today."

The Sunday Times last week met 15 Malays in the rural Muslim-majority districts of Mersing and Muar, who said they identified themselves

Much More: http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/johors-malays-tilt-towards-conservative-islam-survey

TwoScoops, Strategist and others - this is like a slow motion train wreck that is starting to move to fast motion. There were signs of what was coming years ago when I first traveled in the area if you took the time to read, watch and listen.

The Great "Jihad" may or may not have petered out (I wouldn't want to place any money that they are gone, the Jihad over) and there is no shortage of funding for those that carry on just like there is no shortage of funding for political shenanigans in this country from either side.
5   Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 19, 8:32am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
Johorean Zakiah Mat Lila has never said "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Deepavali" to her neighbours. She will vote only for Muslims and applauds strict Islamic laws, such as cutting off the hands of thieves and caning fornicators.


This is the disease that has to be stopped from spreading.
6   TwoScoopsPlissken   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 19, 12:08pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says


So, you're in favor of not allowing Muslim immigration to the West, right?

BayAreaObserver says
"I say yes to hudud laws for Muslims. Do it like in Saudi Arabia, nobody will dare to steal if they know their hands might get chopped off," the 50-year-old coffee vendor told The Sunday Times in Mersing, a coastal town in eastern Johor.


Hardly a youth being attracted to Islam. The word is out: Conservative Islam is for childless smelly loser kids.
7   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Dec 4, 5:28pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

Indonesia's largest Muslim organisation warns against politicians using Islam to win votes.

KUALA LUMPUR: Indonesia’s largest Muslim organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), has warned that politicians who use Islam to win votes inevitably end up discriminating against minorities and provoking intolerance that can lead to religious conflict.

“There are political actors who have used Islam as a weapon and have succeeded (in winning elections). Using religion in a heterogenous society (ends up) discriminating against people of other faiths,” Yahya Staquf, secretary-general of NU, told Channel NewsAsia.

“This has the potential to trigger conflict with other faiths that can easily be turned into violent conflicts. We cannot afford any more religious conflicts,” said Staquf.

Indonesia was rocked by massive demonstrations led by Islamist groups to protest against Jakarta’s former ethnic Chinese Christian governor, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, popularly known by his nickname Ahok, in the run-up to May 2017 gubenartorial elections which he eventually lost.

Islamist parties and hardline Islamic groups told Muslims it was forbidden to vote for Ahok as he does not follow that faith. The anti-Ahok Islamist groups came to be known as Movement 212.

On Friday (Dec 1), the Jakarta-based Setara Institute said the anti-Ahok movement was a political movement that will continue to exist with the aim of controlling public space.

“Controlling public space is the target of the 212 elites to raise their political bargaining power with those seeking political power or with political groups who are currently in power,” said Setara in a statement.

“Religious populism leads to a loss of rationale amongst believers. People should be aware that such movements are a danger to social cohesion in a multi-ethnic nation,” said Setara.

More: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/indonesia-s-largest-muslim-organisation-warns-against-9460576
8   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Dec 20, 5:38pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

Religio-political forces on rise in Indonesia, new paper argues.

The 100,000-strong crowd that turned out in downtown Jakarta for Sunday’s protest over US President Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli’s capital again demonstrates the newfound power of what academia calls religio-political entrepreneurs.

It was the largest pro-Palestine protest in the Indonesian capital in memory, though outnumbered by the massive crowds who demonstrated against Jakarta’s ethnic-Chinese governor Basuki Purnama in November and December 2016, which brought about his downfall.

In the context of today’s political environment, however, the influence of Indonesia’s religio-political organizers, who first surfaced during last April’s gubernatorial race, could have serious implications for President Joko Widodo in the run-up to the 2019 national elections.

Written by Australian National University Associate Professor Marcus Mietzner, Indikator Politik Indonesian executive director Burhanuddin Muhtadi and Lembaga Survei Indonesia (LSI) researcher Rizka Halida, it calls the 2016 protests “an important shift in Indonesian politics” and notes that opposition to non-Muslims holding political positions has only hardened since then.

In its seventh Global Wealth Report, released this year, the Credit Suisse Research Institute described Indonesia as the world’s fourth most unequal country, noting that the top 1% of an adult population of 164 million control half of the vast nation’s US$1.8 trillion wealth.

“The problem with the trickle-down theory is that there has been no trickle,” Ma’ruf Amin, leader of the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI), told the recent annual conference of Nahdlatul Ulama, the world’s largest Islamic organization, which has called on the Indonesian government to come up with a new economic model.

http://www.atimes.com/article/religio-political-forces-rise-indonesia-new-paper-argues/
9   Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Dec 20, 7:26pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
It was the largest pro-Palestine protest in the Indonesian capital in memory


Anyone who supports Palestine is a terrorist supporter.
11   Quigley   ignore (0)   2017 Dec 25, 5:05pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

Islam is a death cult.
12   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 7, 4:59pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

Marketing morality a winning strategy for Indonesian hardline groups. Finding a scapegoat is an enticing strategy to win over youths who feel let down by the promises of modernity and market liberalisation, say two experts on Indonesian politics.


JAKARTA: The first anniversary of the largest religiously-driven mass demonstration in Indonesia has just been celebrated by some of the organisations that were its driving force.

Millions of Muslims descended upon Jakarta in December 2016 and joined with large numbers of the city’s residents in a rally called the Action to Defend Islam. The demonstrators demanded that then governor of Jakarta Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (better known as Ahok) be stripped of his governorship and put on trial for blaspheming against Islam.

Ahok, who is now in prison, controversially commented on a Quranic verse that suggests Muslims should not appoint a non-Muslim leader. Ahok himself is a Christian and ethnically Chinese.

This makes him part of a social group seen by many in Indonesia to have unfairly benefited from colonial-era policies that concentrated wealth in their hands.

LET DOWN BY MODERNITY

The Ahok case shows a link between expressions of Muslim solidarity and resentment of existing socio-economic conditions.


In Indonesia, religious morality potentially provides a rich cultural resource pool for competing elites to exploit, including in many of the 171 local elections due to take place across the archipelago in 2018. The narrative of oppression, used so well against Ahok, is often employed to rally mass mobilisations of support.

This narrative is one that emphasises the struggles of a virtuous but marginalised majority that forms an ummah (community of believers). The ummah is contrasted against greedy business elites (typically the ethnic Chinese minority) who are in turn backed by corrupt and powerful political figures.

More: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/commentary-marketing-morality-a-winning-strategy-for-indonesian-9835046

Any of this sound vaguely familiar ? Like the forgotten people in flyover country? Sharia Trumpism...
13   Strategist   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 7, 5:41pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
JAKARTA: The first anniversary of the largest religiously-driven mass demonstration in Indonesia has just been celebrated by some of the organisations that were its driving force.

Millions of Muslims descended upon Jakarta in December 2016 and joined with large numbers of the city’s residents in a rally called the Action to Defend Islam. The demonstrators demanded that then governor of Jakarta Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (better known as Ahok) be stripped of his governorship and put on trial for blaspheming against Islam.


Most of the demonstrators are not likely to be classified as terrorists, but they could be classified as dangerous extremists who will breed future terrorists.

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