Mobile homes are no longer affordable
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1   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 21, 8:24am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

It's a shame about the 73 year old lady who lost her home, but mobile homes and Florida just isn't a good combination. It's hard to imagine paying $120,000 for something that is going to depreciate and wear out over 15-20 years regardless of how nicely it's fitted out inside.
2   goat   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 21, 10:00am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

P N Dr Lo R says
It's hard to imagine paying $120,000 for something that is going to depreciate and wear out over 15-20 years regardless of how nicely it's fitted out inside.

I've always wondered why the quality of manufactured homes is like this? I get that it's a value-conscious product, but you would think that someone would offer a brand or model line that was built a bit better so that it would last like a regular home.
3   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 21, 11:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Here's your liberty: you can't have land, you can't build a shack and can't buy the cheapest overbuilt shack.
4   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 21, 11:10am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Trailers will hold up and wear quite well but that of course depends on the amount of effort that is put into upkeep and maintenance by the owner but the salt air environment will no doubt add to maintenance requirements. Of course this can be applied to most anything else like an automobile etc. - who owns it and maintains it has a tremendous impact on longevity.

Sure they depreciate however the newer ones at least here up north are built with the same 2x4 or 2x6 walls etc. as a stick built home.

How the trailer is sitting on the property has a great deal to do with longevity and then again these large trailers were never designed for multiple moves over the course of 15-20 years.
5   Tenpoundbass   ignore (6)   2017 Nov 21, 11:28am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
Trailers will hold up and wear quite well but that of course depends on the amount of effort that is put into upkeep and maintenance by the owner but the salt air environment will no doubt add to maintenance requirements. Of course this can be applied to most anything else like an automobile etc. - who owns it and maintains it has a tremendous impact on longevity.


Trailers will hold up if you gut them, frame them build the walls and ceiling with drywall, and rip up the Particle board floors and replace them with marine grade plywood. Clad the outside with a brick foundation and a concrete porch. Then it might last the years. That's a mobile home that can sell for 170K. But we're still talking about trailers that has door skin wall paneling, 1X2 furring strip for wall studs, and particle board floors. This is what Warren Buffet is selling for $170K you would have to spend another $60K to $80K to make it livable.

When I did Carpet the Canadians would do such upgrades to their mobile homes. Those same homes today look like they did 20 years ago when I drive by them. Their neighbors that didn't, the trailers looks like it's falling apart. I drive by them all the time.
6   goat   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 11:30am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

At some point it might even make sense to just replace the thing every decade or 2. The price of this is hard to believe: https://www.claytonhomes.com/homes/36TRU14602AH $25-44k, and a quick google search suggested that delivery + install might be in the $7-15k range.

It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.

The house model name is kinda funny tho...the "Delight" rofl
7   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 22, 11:40am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Problem with the old trailers is the formaldehyde. They can cause a pulsing headache in the susceptible. In Cali, they can be ripped down and used as shells for rebuilds and insulated. If you do this without permits, your tax base does not go up on owned lots. I know people who have inherited prop 13 units who have opted to rebuild the old place with major upgrades/insulation/windows/floors etc. and they basically have negligible property taxes going forward.
8   Booger   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 4:11pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Didn't that 73 year old person have homeowners insurance?

No mention of the rents charged at some of these places?
9   Strategist   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 4:21pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

anon_fd7ee says
goat says
It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.


Let us know if it works out. I am considering doing exactly the same thing. Utilities hookup would cost a lot. Do they require foundations?


Oops. This is Strategist.
10   anon_fd7ee   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 6:28pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

goat says
It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.


Let us know if it works out. I am considering doing exactly the same thing. Utilities hookup would cost a lot. Do they require foundations?
11   anon_3e01a   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 6:28pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Strategist, ADUs are now legal in all of California. Put one of these in your back yard (don't need a separate utilities hookup).
12   Strategist   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 6:50pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

anon_3e01a says
Strategist, ADUs are now legal in all of California. Put one of these in your back yard (don't need a separate utilities hookup).


I'm looking at this from a pure investment point of view. We could build one on our back yard as space is not the problem, but my wife does not feel comfortable with the idea.
If I can successfully try it on a couple of vacant lots that I already have, I could duplicate the concept for a whole bunch of them. So far I have taken quotes to just get a manufactured home and put them on the lots. I was not too impressed.
A tiny home or a used mobile home might work. I don't know yet. California is full of surprises.

Thank you for your input. I welcome all the opinions.
13   BayAreaObserver   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 23, 2:23am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

TPB - "Trailers will hold up if you gut them, frame them build the walls and ceiling with drywall, and rip up the Particle board floors and replace them with marine grade plywood. Clad the outside with a brick foundation and a concrete porch. Then it might last the years."

In 1975 my parents bought a 14 x 70 trailer with furnishings. I believe the brand was North American which at the time was one of the better builders. When my father and step-mother went into a nursing home in 2010, they still had the same place without doing any of the things you talked about - not one.

They replaced the kitchen range with a smooth top my step-mother wanted, one hot water heater and one year before moving the furnace only because the contractor working on it broke a part there was no longer a replacement for. The original washer/dryer combination, refrigerator, and every other component remained in pristine working condition. The sofa was a "Flexsteel" brand and it was never replaced or had to be reupholstered and was used daily. They also replaced some carpeting and the sheet vinyl in the kitchen/dining area just because they could.

The old man did all of his own maintenance inside and out. He also fabricated and installed his own skirting, was proactive in adding heat tape to the under trailer plumbing etc. - the only major maintenance was resealing the roof every couple years since it was one of the older models before the manufacturers went to shingle pitched roofs like stick built homes.

Aside from whatever problem you have with Warren Buffet trailers or "modular" homes are a reasonable alternative for a lot of people and prior to moving here I did quite a bit of research on that option. I would have no problem at all buying and living in one. For the prices you are talking the construction is identical to a stick built home up north, not sure what is being offered in the south.

The one small downside (aside from depreciation) with a trailer home is financing which is always at a slightly higher interest rate and there home owners was not a problem otherwise I would have heard about it year in and year out.

The biggest problem with mobile home living is the lot rent, if you do not own the lot. 10 years ago lot rents in and around Concord, California were running in the 600-900 a month range, not any better the farther out you went and worse in the San Jose area. Then again I have no idea what lot rents in a park down south are running.
14   anon_3e01a   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 23, 10:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Strategist, I'm guessing the lots are not in Coronado Beach?

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