« prev   random   next »
1   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 21, 8:24am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

It's a shame about the 73 year old lady who lost her home, but mobile homes and Florida just isn't a good combination. It's hard to imagine paying $120,000 for something that is going to depreciate and wear out over 15-20 years regardless of how nicely it's fitted out inside.
2   Hircus   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 21, 10:00am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

P N Dr Lo R says
It's hard to imagine paying $120,000 for something that is going to depreciate and wear out over 15-20 years regardless of how nicely it's fitted out inside.

I've always wondered why the quality of manufactured homes is like this? I get that it's a value-conscious product, but you would think that someone would offer a brand or model line that was built a bit better so that it would last like a regular home.
3   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 21, 11:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Here's your liberty: you can't have land, you can't build a shack and can't buy the cheapest overbuilt shack.
4   Tenpoundbass   ignore (11)   2017 Nov 21, 11:28am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

anonymous says
Trailers will hold up and wear quite well but that of course depends on the amount of effort that is put into upkeep and maintenance by the owner but the salt air environment will no doubt add to maintenance requirements. Of course this can be applied to most anything else like an automobile etc. - who owns it and maintains it has a tremendous impact on longevity.


Trailers will hold up if you gut them, frame them build the walls and ceiling with drywall, and rip up the Particle board floors and replace them with marine grade plywood. Clad the outside with a brick foundation and a concrete porch. Then it might last the years. That's a mobile home that can sell for 170K. But we're still talking about trailers that has door skin wall paneling, 1X2 furring strip for wall studs, and particle board floors. This is what Warren Buffet is selling for $170K you would have to spend another $60K to $80K to make it livable.

When I did Carpet the Canadians would do such upgrades to their mobile homes. Those same homes today look like they did 20 years ago when I drive by them. Their neighbors that didn't, the trailers looks like it's falling apart. I drive by them all the time.
5   Hircus   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 22, 11:30am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

At some point it might even make sense to just replace the thing every decade or 2. The price of this is hard to believe: https://www.claytonhomes.com/homes/36TRU14602AH $25-44k, and a quick google search suggested that delivery + install might be in the $7-15k range.

It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.

The house model name is kinda funny tho...the "Delight" rofl
6   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 22, 11:40am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Problem with the old trailers is the formaldehyde. They can cause a pulsing headache in the susceptible. In Cali, they can be ripped down and used as shells for rebuilds and insulated. If you do this without permits, your tax base does not go up on owned lots. I know people who have inherited prop 13 units who have opted to rebuild the old place with major upgrades/insulation/windows/floors etc. and they basically have negligible property taxes going forward.
7   Booger   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 22, 4:11pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Didn't that 73 year old person have homeowners insurance?

No mention of the rents charged at some of these places?
8   Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 22, 4:21pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

anon_fd7ee says
goat says
It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.


Let us know if it works out. I am considering doing exactly the same thing. Utilities hookup would cost a lot. Do they require foundations?


Oops. This is Strategist.
9   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Nov 22, 6:28pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

goat says
It making me consider buying one of those undeveloped lots in the hills that we see all over the bay, and sticking one of these on it. Better than a typical apartment that goes for $2500/mo. Plus, the land value will still appreciate, even if the home itself behaves more like a consumable.


Let us know if it works out. I am considering doing exactly the same thing. Utilities hookup would cost a lot. Do they require foundations?
10   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Nov 22, 6:28pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Strategist, ADUs are now legal in all of California. Put one of these in your back yard (don't need a separate utilities hookup).
11   Strategist   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 22, 6:50pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

anon_3e01a says
Strategist, ADUs are now legal in all of California. Put one of these in your back yard (don't need a separate utilities hookup).


I'm looking at this from a pure investment point of view. We could build one on our back yard as space is not the problem, but my wife does not feel comfortable with the idea.
If I can successfully try it on a couple of vacant lots that I already have, I could duplicate the concept for a whole bunch of them. So far I have taken quotes to just get a manufactured home and put them on the lots. I was not too impressed.
A tiny home or a used mobile home might work. I don't know yet. California is full of surprises.

Thank you for your input. I welcome all the opinions.
12   anonymous   ignore (null)   2017 Nov 23, 10:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Strategist, I'm guessing the lots are not in Coronado Beach?




The Housing Trap
You're being set up to spend your life paying off a debt you don't need to take on, for a house that costs far more than it should. The conspirators are all around you, smiling to lure you in, carefully choosing their words and watching your reactions as they push your buttons, anxiously waiting for the moment when you sign the papers that will trap you and guarantee their payoff. Don't be just another victim of the housing market. Use this book to defend your freedom and defeat their schemes. You can win the game, but first you have to learn how to play it.
115 pages, $12.50

Kindle version available


about   best comments   contact   one year ago   suggestions