Is this tiny house “revolutionary”
« prev   housing
1   Sniper   ignore (8)   2017 Nov 27, 3:35pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

No, just the opposite.
2   APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE   ignore (5)   2017 Nov 27, 8:03pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

It's just fucking sad.

Why not just move into a packing crate at the rail yards?
3   Strategist   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 27, 8:14pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE says
It's just fucking sad.

Why not just move into a packing crate at the rail yards?


Why is it sad? There are people in Hong Kong who practically live in a coffin.
It's kinda cute. Imagine putting 10 of them in your backyard, and charging $95 per day through Airbnb.
4   Sniper   ignore (8)   2017 Nov 27, 8:15pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Strategist says
Imagine putting 10 of them in your backyard, and charging $95 per day through Airbnb.


That's already being done, for $125 a night.
5   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 27, 11:55pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

"Remember Professor Wilson? He’s the teacher I once told you about who took a dumpster and turned it into a tiny home and then followed through by living in it for 10 months!
That’s right! He actually lived in a converted DUMPSTER for ten months (happily)!"

"Things got a little bumpy on collection days, but I just took my seasickness meds and it was OK, even fun being turned upside down with the lid clanging! I had to take an occasional trip back from the dump, but it is all part of being green."
6   anon_ea3a4   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 28, 7:05am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Strategist says
APOCALYPSEFUCK_is_ADORABLE says
It's just fucking sad.

Why not just move into a packing crate at the rail yards?


Why is it sad? There are people in Hong Kong who practically live in a coffin.
It's kinda cute. Imagine putting 10 of them in your backyard, and charging $95 per day through Airbnb.

Looks fine to me, certainly if I were young and single. Saw this a while ago. Would also be quite a nice back yard addition to a good number of houses if you want to give guests some privacy.

Wouldn't be much of a stretch to have two side by side or on top to make it more practical for a couple.
Sort of thing that would be perfect for places like San Francisco, London, Tokyo... I lived in a place not much bigger than that in Tokyo for a number of years. Perfectly fine as long as you don't have a family. Also means you don't accumulate a load of crap.
7   KimJongUn   ignore (0)   2017 Nov 28, 8:25am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

It's a shitbox.
8   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 28, 9:09am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Excerpt from one of the funnier comments:

Cahow:

"And, if “Professor Dumpster ™” aka Professor Jeff Wilson wasn’t trying so utterly, completely, epically HARD to be Tragically Hip, I’d give him at least passing credit for attempting something “Radical.”

Let’s do a check list of Professor Hipster’s wardrobe:

1) Indiana Jones Fedora Hat. Check!
2) Buddy Holly Glasses. 20/20 Check-Check!!
3) Bow Tie. Triple Check!
4) Plaid Shirt. Check! and Hipster Approved Check!
5) Wacky Golf Pants. Check! and Grandpa Approved Check!
6) Wackier Wackadoodle Socks. Check to the 6th Degree of Check-dom!
7) Earth Friendly Shoes. Final Check off of Classic Hipster Wardrobe, Check!"
9   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 28, 9:44am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

I think we're moving away from centralization, so don't see these having long term viability as large complex's, but the idea of mass production on the cheap sounds very cool. I love how the space in these things is always so functional and minimalist.
10   Sniper   ignore (8)   2017 Nov 28, 10:20am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

NuttBoxer says
I love how the space in these things is always so functional and minimalist.


You willing to pay $100K for it?
11   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2017 Nov 28, 10:29am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Doesn't sound like they have their mass production price point set.
12   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 28, 11:43am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

NuttBoxer says
I think we're moving away from
first world status.
13   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 28, 12:43pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Norwegian prison cells look like better living than that.

Yeah, Professor Dumpster looks like he could use a good royal lift, but the place isn't big enough to get good grip and leverage.
14   anon_61c8a   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 28, 3:37pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

It's revolutionary to conceive of these things being hyper engineered, built in a factory, and rated for moving fitting into a rack system. However, if they cost $100K, that is too much. The sliding bed design, the glass, and the presumably low maintenance aspect is very appealing, though. If there was a big enough market to make the rental spaces widely available and reasonably priced, the combination of rental spaces, durability, and design may command the price.
15   Sniper   ignore (8)   2017 Nov 28, 7:09pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

anon_61c8a says
the combination of rental spaces, durability, and design may command the price.


The problem with this whole movement is that a certain portion of the population is looking for cheaper housing, as they can't afford a regular house. The issue is, these same people have absolutely shit credit, so there is no way they can get approved for financing to purchase one of these. So unless the developer/builder is willing to do a no money down, no security deposit rental, there won't be any growth. The potential customer is broke.
16   anon_61c8a   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 29, 9:07am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Sniper says
The problem with this whole movement is that a certain portion of the population is looking for cheaper housing...
these same people have absolutely shit credit, so there is no way they can get approved for financing to purchase one of these.

There used to be a poster here named ironman who had the same belief. He built a boring looking tiny house and tried to sell it in the NJ suburbs without first doing market research. When he couldn't sell the thing, he came to sour on the whole concept. You wouldn't know anything about that, I guess.

This professor is doing something very different. Instead of building a single unit, this guy is trying to create a market. One potential buyer group is kids who could buy one during college (parents pay). They could live in one on campus, assuming that there was a rack there, and then just move it into the city when graduated. Perhaps, they could take it on a couple of moves for their first couple of jobs. When they get older, they sell it and buy a traditional house. This is as big as lower end apartments in NYC anyway. The biggest impediments are (1) how to create the infrastructure and market from scratch (2) how to get people to want to live in a very generic unit for a long time. (3) is finding a rack and moving one of these things any easier than finding an apt to rent and moving all of your stuff? Any of those could kill this project, and it will probably fail. But it could revolutionize a segment of the urban housing market.
17   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 29, 9:19am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Housing that looks like a work cubicle with a bed and a microwave. Maybe this is to slowly induct MillXYers into job recognizance.
18   anon_61c8a   ignore (1)   2017 Nov 29, 10:11am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Sniper says
a shipping container with windows.

I don't think that is an accurate description of what the item is. It does seem somewhat overpriced to me, and I think the price could come down. However, you are undervaluing the design, the high-tech window room, and the potential utility of the rack system. If someone were to buy ironman's unit as a primary dwelling, they would have to figure out how to hook it up and who's back yard they could squat in, and they would be paying more for maintenance. If they bought one of these, and the infrastructure were in place, they could just pay rent and be hooked up with utilities in an attractive area if that is what they want. There's no point in buying one where land is cheap.

A better use for ironman's unit is for someone to stick it in their back yard and rent a place out in the winter near an urban area or use it for a holiday guest house. Then, in the summer, move it onto a piece of vacation property. It's basically a heavy ass RV with good insulation. Another possibility is to sell to a recently retired person who wants to travel and live in different locations.

Comment as anon_11f5e or log in at top of page: