Rivers, Streams Becoming Saltier, More Alkaline All Over North America
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Rivers, Streams Becoming Saltier, More Alkaline All Over North America

By BayAreaObserver following x   2018 Jan 9, 2:57am 163 views   6 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


Human activities are causing the amount of salt in rivers and streams across North America to increase, and the increased salinity is also leading to a rise in the alkalinity of these waterways, according to a study published Monday. The change in freshwater could have big implications for drinking water supply, natural ecosystems, as well as urban infrastructure.

The study looked at the changing chemical profile of freshwater in the United States, using data collected over the last 50 years from 232 U.S. Geological Survey monitoring sites around the country. Some of the major rivers that showed significant chemical changes over the years are the Mississippi, Hudson, Potomac, Neuse, Canadian and Chattahoochee.

Data showed 37 percent of the drainage area in contiguous U.S. saw a large increase in salinity, while alkalinization went up by 90 percent. The increases, and their reasons, differed from region to region, and some regions also saw a reduction in salinity.

Titled Freshwater salinization syndrome on a continental scale, the study appeared online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers who authored it were led by Sujay Kaushal from the University of Maryland.

“We created the name ‘Freshwater Salinization Syndrome’ because we realized it’s a suite of effects on water quality, with many different salt ions linked together. We didn’t know that before. Many people assume that when you apply salt to the landscape it just gets washed away and disappears. But salt accumulates in soils and groundwater and takes decades to get flushed out,” Kaushal explained in a statement Monday.

Salt here does not refer to just sodium chloride, or table salt that we use in food, as well as for deicing roads. The term in chemistry refers to “any combination of positively and negatively charged ions that dissociate in water.” And such salts reach waterways and seep into the ground from a number of human activities, such as fertilizers from agriculture, or even all the waste produced by humans. When more than one salt is present in an area, it can compound the toxic effects.

More Including Graphics. http://www.ibtimes.com/rivers-streams-becoming-saltier-more-alkaline-all-over-north-america-2638952

Note the area in the Minnesota Arrowhead region as well the Duluth/Superior area showing the increase in "salt" content.

#Water #Environment

Abstract and Overview of Study Cited in Article: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/01/03/1711234115.short?rss=1

Full Study Cited in Article: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/01/03/1711234115.full.pdf
1   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 9, 10:39am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Exactly how is human activity increasing the saltiness in areas where they don't even salt the roads?
2   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2018 Jan 9, 10:53am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
Many people assume that when you apply salt to the landscape it just gets washed away and disappears.


No way! People really believe this!?
3   anon_5611d   ignore (0)   2018 Jan 9, 10:56am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Fertilizers, ground water usage for irrigation(easily seen in the Central Valley if you fly up and down California, industrial activity, prevailing winds also blow west to east.

Look at the definition of what a salt is that was used in the OP.

The "warm" areas are largely agricultural and are or used to be industrial.
4   HEYYOU   ignore (6)   2018 Jan 9, 11:49am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

anon_5611d says
Fertilizers, ground water usage for irrigation(easily seen in the Central Valley if you fly up and down California, industrial activity, prevailing winds also blow west to east.

Look at the definition of what a salt is that was used in the OP.

The "warm" areas are largely agricultural and are or used to be industrial.


Please stop posting stuff that might force people think. ;-)
........

Speaking of (blood)streams,what's in the Republicans' children & grandchildrens' bodies.
"In fact, Norwegian scientists studying U.S. soy found "excessive" levels of glyphosate inside of the food crop. Don't eat tofu? Doesn't matter: GE corn and soy fall under dozens of different ingredient names in most processed foods, such as mono-diglyceride, Soya, lecithin, textured vegetable protein, and more."

https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/food/how-much-toxic-roundup-are-you-eating/slide/1
5   Sniper   ignore (10)   2018 Jan 9, 12:17pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

BayAreaObserver says
or even all the waste produced by humans.


Ahhh, there's the problem, stop eating processed foods filled with salt, and all the salt by-products won't be coming out of human waste.
6   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 9, 12:48pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Sniper says
Ahhh, there's the problem, stop eating processed foods filled with salt, and all the salt by-products won't be coming out of human waste.


I'm pretty sure that is taken out at the waste water treatment plant. Having said that, I don't recall it ever being mentioned when I used to work a one.

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