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Facebook has been collecting call history and SMS data from Android devices

By someone else following x   2018 Mar 25, 10:11pm 1,486 views   30 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/25/17160944/facebook-call-history-sms-data-collection-android

Facebook has been collecting call records and SMS data from Android devices for years. Several Twitter users have reported finding months or years of call history data in their downloadable Facebook data file. A number of Facebook users have been spooked by the recent Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal, prompting them to download all the data that Facebook stores on their account. The results have been alarming for some.

“Oh wow my deleted Facebook Zip file contains info on every single phone cellphone call and text I made for about a year,” says ‏Twitter user Mat Johnson. Another, Dylan McKay, says “somehow it has my entire call history with my partner’s mum.” Others have found a similar pattern where it appears close contacts, like family members, are the only ones tracked in Facebook’s call records.
1   justme   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 25, 10:47pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Great, just great.
2   mmmarvel   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 26, 6:01am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I have a facebook account, but I don't use it on my phone. I don't do twitter (although I do have an account, got it to tie up my handle - never signed on or used the app). I don't do ANY kind of banking on my phone. I know, I'm old and out of touch ... but there is a lot less of me out there for cyber-criminals to find.
3   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 7:44am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
Facebook has been collecting call records and SMS data from Android devices for years.


Interesting part, the people who downloaded the app gave Facebook the permission to do so. Nobody actually READS the permissions and access they grant to an app when they download it. Now they're surprised??? Dumb "sheep".

Hey, it's a FREE app, what could go wrong? It's a FREE app because YOU'RE the product (and your personal data) that's being sold off.
4   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 7:47am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

mmmarvel says
I don't do ANY kind of banking on my phone.


Just think of the level of financial data that has been siphoned off people's phones regarding bank accounts, credit cards, investments, loans, etc. Most people even stay signed into these apps for quick access. Talk about leaving the door wide open for the robbers.

The level of personal and private information VOLUNTARILY given away and siphoned off from people is astounding!
5   Patrick   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 26, 7:57am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I've had jobs demand that I install apps for authentication or on-call alerts, and these apps demanded access to everything.

So then the choice gets ugly fast:

* buy a new phone just for my current job
* tell my boss that I refuse to install their required apps
6   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 8:02am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
So then the choice gets ugly fast:

* buy a new phone just for my current job


That would be my choice, or tell him to give you a company phone for company work.

I've done both of those.

Patrick says
* tell my boss that I refuse to install their required apps


Can a boss/company intrude in your "personal" space? That wouldn't be a company I would ever work for.

Patrick says
I've had jobs demand that I install apps for authentication or on-call alerts, and these apps demanded access to everything.


Did you give him access to your checking accounts and investment accounts at home?
7   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 26, 8:58am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sniper says
Did you give him access to your checking accounts and investment accounts at home?


Who the fuck trades stocks from a phone? I wouldn't trust a phone for any financial transaction!

#fuckfacebook

This is why companies (not just FaceBook) want you to use their app, instead of their website. I bet they would have none of this info if you had used FaceBook's web page from your phone instead.
8   Goran_K   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 26, 9:02am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I would never install Twitter, FB, or FB messenger onto my phone. That's just asking for all of your communications to be recorded and stored for future leftist oppression.
9   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 10:51am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sniper says
Nobody actually READS the permissions and access they grant to an app when they download it.


zzyzzx says
This is why companies (not just FaceBook) want you to use their app, instead of their website.


Goran_K says
That's just asking for all of your communications to be recorded and stored for future leftist oppression.


Regarding the permissions given for an app. I downloaded a Flashlight app a while ago, so I decided to check on the permissions:

Here's the list:
My location
Network communication - full network access, WiFi connections, receive data from Internet
SD card storage contents,- modify or delete contents
Phone calls,- read phone status and identity
Hardware controls,- take pictures and videos, control flashlight
System tools,- change display, modify system, retrieve running apps,
Development tools,- test access to protected storage

This is a fucking Flashlight application to turn on the flash. Why the fuck does it need all those permissions and access????

Oh yeah, because it's FREE, and I'm the product.

Want to guess what all the apps on YOUR phone is accessing?
10   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 26, 12:26pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

You donwloaded it anyway? My phone came with a flashlight app pre-installed. It only has access to read my SD card.
11   RafiMaas   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 26, 12:33pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Goran_K says
I would never install Twitter, FB, or FB messenger onto my phone. That's just asking for all of your communications to be recorded and stored for future leftist oppression.


Not to mention Rightists oppression.
12   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 1:45pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

zzyzzx says
You donwloaded it anyway? My phone came with a flashlight app pre-installed. It only has access to read my SD card.


Even there, why does it need access to the SD card to turn on a light??

I deleted it, plus I don't do any financial or important business on my phone. If they want my texts and phone book, have at it.
13   Patrick   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 26, 2:11pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sniper says
Did you give him access to your checking accounts and investment accounts at home?


Actually, employers around here also generally demand that you be paid by direct deposit.

Most people are unaware that authorization for direct deposit by your employer is also explicit authorization for direct withdrawl of any amount the employer deems appropriate. Read the fine print.

I was unaware of this until one employer actually did withdraw a small overpayment. I was confused about how they could do that until the bank explained it to me.
14   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 26, 2:17pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

If I use my cell phone more than twice a month, it's a lot. I use it mostly to read books and listen to music.
I don't even carry it around much, just check it for messages every few days. It's mostly in my glove compartment. Yeah, damned Luddite.
15   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 26, 3:04pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

zzyzzx says
Who the fuck trades stocks from a phone? I wouldn't trust a phone for any financial transaction!


I hear you but I do. Unless you trade either infrequently or have no other job or duties it's the only way to make quick trades and react to the market on the go or at the job without having to whip out a laptop or tablet. Most cell phone trading apps are nowadays almost as good as their desktop/laptop counterparts. Occasional fat fingering is obviously a given so just need to get enough practice to trade like a whiz. Do not use fb for trading only the native apps by the fincos.
16   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 26, 3:36pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
Actually, employers around here also generally demand that you be paid by direct deposit.

Most people are unaware that authorization for direct deposit by your employer is also explicit authorization for direct withdrawl of any amount the employer deems appropriate. Read the fine print.


Yep.

Which is why, when I was working, I had the direct deposits go into a separate checking account that wasn't used for all my regular bills. They can't take what isn't there.

Patrick says
I was confused about how they could do that until the bank explained it to me.


You're learning. At the end of the day, you're just a cog in the company's wheel that can go away at any time. Plan accordingly.

I kept my personal business and my employment business as separate as possible. I also never used my business email for any personal business. I can't tell you how many people I know who mix the two together, and the day they get terminated from the company, all that personal stuff is lost.
17   TwoScoopsOfWompWomp   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 26, 5:51pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

“The FTC is firmly and fully committed to using all of its tools to protect the privacy of consumers. Foremost among these tools is enforcement action against companies that fail to honor their privacy promises, including to comply with Privacy Shield, or that engage in unfair acts that cause substantial injury to consumers in violation of the FTC Act. Companies who have settled previous FTC actions must also comply with FTC order provisions imposing privacy and data security requirements. Accordingly, the FTC takes very seriously recent press reports raising substantial concerns about the privacy practices of Facebook. Today, the FTC is confirming that it has an open non-public investigation into these practices.”

https://www.axios.com/facebook-under-federal-investigation-ftc-2926ae98-77fd-4c28-8ece-b0a51f95ca76.html

#ZuckFuck
19   mmmarvel   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 27, 8:59am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sniper says
Sniper says
Nobody actually READS the permissions and access they grant to an app when they download it.


20   HEYYOU   ignore (17)   2018 Mar 27, 9:28am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

All the news about Facebook simple points out how stupid social media users are.

A dish served cold.
Write a form letter & send it to all pop-up adds & those that appear immediately after you have searched.
I will boycott your company until you can prove that you aren't tracking me anywhere on the net or getting my search info from another
company that is tracking me.
Want to compete in a free market,sell the best product at the best price.
Don't you hate old sayings,"They will be beating a path to your door!"

Sorry to see you close your doors!
21   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 27, 12:24pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Sniper says
Regarding the permissions given for an app. I downloaded a Flashlight app a while ago, so I decided to check on the permissions:

Here's the list:
My location


You can turn off that feature on your phone so no apps know where you are. You really only need it turned on if you are using your phone as a GPS.
22   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 27, 1:28pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

zzyzzx says
Sniper says
Regarding the permissions given for an app. I downloaded a Flashlight app a while ago, so I decided to check on the permissions:

Here's the list:
My location


You can turn off that feature on your phone so no apps know where you are. You really only need it turned on if you are using your phone as a GPS.


It's been turned off from the beginning, and every other locater service and I don't use GPS on my phone.

Unfortunately, the phone still pings towers so it can receive texts and calls.
23   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 28, 6:17pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Apparently this list is only part of the data collection. I was watching a news story earlier, and they stated a whole bunch of other siphoning of personal information.



The question I have, how many high level executives have had ALL of their personal and business communications and geo tracking siphoned off by Facebook? That could be one major legal action, if true.
24   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (32)   2018 Mar 28, 7:09pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Using facebook at any level should be a firing offense.

The thing is a sewer commanded by a monster and filled with disease!
25   HEYYOU   ignore (17)   2018 Mar 28, 7:20pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

A fool & his privacy are soon parted.
26   HEYYOU   ignore (17)   2018 Mar 28, 8:34pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Social media users are so charitable! They give away their privacy with a click.
27   CBOEtrader   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 28, 9:42pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I heard they collect jerk off videos of you when you watch pornhub.
28   TwoScoopsOfWompWomp   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 28, 10:42pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

2001-2007: Crazy Alex Jones Listeners, Conspiracy theory Assholes. It's only happening to terrorists, and very narrowly applied. Nobody is hoarding your data, tinfoil hatters!

2008-2012: Obama was smart to use Social Media to reach young voters!

2012-2015: Silence

2016-2017: MUH RUSSIA! used Social Media to manipulate Trump into the White House! Thank God for Comey, Mueller, and the FISA Warrants on Trump's Associates, though!

2018: Holy Crap, our Privacy is totally gone!
29   MrMagic   ignore (9)   2018 Mar 29, 7:26am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Has anyone actually downloaded their Facebook file to see what they actually collected yet?

I don't have a FB page, but my wife does. She only goes on occasionally from her netbook and NOT her cell phone or business laptop and I log on, just to see what crap the kids and grandkids are doing.

I downloaded her Facebook file, and even with her limited use, I was really surprised on the stuff Facebook siphoned up regarding personal information, email addresses, contact lists and a ton of other personal stuff.

I would recommend ALL of you download YOUR files to see what's there.

Be prepared to be REALLY pissed off when you see what Zuckerberg knows about you and has been selling off to the highest bidder. The CIA and NSA really appreciates all this data collection he's done for them!
30   TwoScoopsOfWompWomp   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 29, 11:52am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Here's a question:

Some states like California are two-party "consent to record" states.

What happens if one person calls another using an app where they consented to phone recording, but the other person who received the call did not use that app or otherwise did not consent?

Isn't that breaking the recording consent laws?

Is the App Company liable?




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