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This is why education is so expensive.

By FortWayne following x   2018 Apr 14, 10:47am 1,320 views   13 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


https://transparentcalifornia.com/salaries/all/

All the top salaries are universities staff. Liberals claim that they need raises all the time, yet it's the children trying to get education who get screwed at the end with high loans, and taxpayers who stuck paying high bills.

Click on pensions:
https://transparentcalifornia.com/pensions/all/

click on "see special note" for just about everyone.
(DROP program paying 1.3Million per individual). Yep that's that nice program that lets people get paid for not working. CA madness.
1   dr6B   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 11:02am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

If you click on "univ of California" and then "regular pay", it arranges according to highest salaries. They all are "CEO" "Exec Dir" "DIR" "Mgr" "VCR and DEAN, that is, horrible ballooning overpaid useless bureaucracy. Classroom instruction is very cheap, but hordes of bureaucrats who sit on their asses thinking of a new diversity initiative costs most money.

Another reason, this time in IL:

In a capsule: The president of one of Illinois' top universities is resigning in disgrace because of allegations of serious mismanagement of taxpayer funds. NIU spent more than $1 million and ignored competitive bidding laws to improperly hire five consultants, pay for their travel and lodging expenses, and keep them on staff for too long at exorbitant pay levels, a state executive inspector general's report concludes.

The report lands while Baker and his fellow college administrators plead with lawmakers in Springfield to send them more money — and warn of dire consequences if they don't.

Baker, who has denied wrongdoing, steps down at the end of June. He'll collect a six-figure severance on his way out the door.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/editorials/ct-illinois-university-niu-rauner-consolidate-edit-jm-20170622-story.html

In 2016, the freshman class enrollment at Chicago State University numbered just 86 incoming students. Meanwhile, the university employed 980 staffers. Even after the ratio was exposed, the numbers haven’t sustainably improved. In 2017, just 145 freshmen enrolled at Chicago State, but the university payroll shows 660 employees costing nearly $40 million.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamandrzejewski/2018/04/13/taxpayer-costs-soar-as-illinois-public-college-university-enrollment-drops/#6420f30a1018
2   HEYYOU   ignore (16)   2018 Apr 14, 11:30am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Income to a university's employees is what brain dead students go into debt for,for life.

It's true! It's true!
You can't fix stupid!
3   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 11:58am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

drB6 says
If you click on "univ of California" and then "regular pay", it arranges according to highest salaries. They all are "CEO" "Exec Dir" "DIR" "Mgr" "VCR and DEAN, that is, horrible ballooning overpaid useless bureaucracy. Classroom instruction is very cheap, but hordes of bureaucrats who sit on their asses thinking of a new diversity initiative costs most money.


You left out constantly being added to palatial facilities and very expensive sports programs. College in America is the biggest scam on the planet. That anyone would even consider sending their kids to a US college is a miracle of a lifetime of systemic brainwashing, sophisticated (also expensive) marketing, and good old fashioned American colloquialism. . Neither of my kids will be attending US colleges even if I were staying in the states. long term .
4   CovfefeButDeadly   ignore (4)   2018 Apr 14, 12:12pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

FortWayne says
https://transparentcalifornia.com/salaries/all/

All the top salaries are universities staff. Liberals claim that they need raises all the time, yet it's the children trying to get education who get screwed at the end with high loans, and taxpayers who stuck paying high bills.


Eliminate student loans over a certain amount and the problem goes away.
5   TwoScoopsOfSpaceForce   ignore (4)   2018 Apr 14, 12:15pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Deans used to be honored long time tenured faculty held in high regard, as a reward for decades of service.

Today they are professional executives, with all that entails. They get a PhD in Education or Admin, maybe they teach a course on Administration once every few years, but they're not really professors by any stretch of the imagination. It's just a little sheep dipping they do to say "I have actual classroom experience."

I can tell you they spend 90% of their time bullshitting, going to conferences, switching institutions for a lateral $20k pay raise, demonstrating their command of classroom-based multidisciplinary approaches based on cognitive and clinical research across the academic landscape, integrating curriculum and lifestyle-focused solutions in institutions of higher learning jargon.

Get rid of professional management. Make the Dean the 20-year Physics Professor again, like prior to 1980.
6   dr6B   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 12:55pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

bob2356 says
You left out constantly being added to palatial facilities and very expensive sports programs.


Absolutely true. In many schools they blow 10% of tuition/fee revenue on sports. Additionally, quality of education is going down the toilet because of lack of rigor. You can not fail someone who pays $60K even if he is a completely lazy dumbass!!! We get constant pressure to pass more students, without direct orders to water down standards, but with a wink and nod "you are too harsh in grading, we need to change something". Side product of this stupidity is that lower middle class people who genuinely want and need education often can not get it because it is too expensive and they might not qualify for subsidies. I am faculty and I can not change any of this. Only thing I get when I bring this up to administration is that I am not a team player followed by ignoring what I said. And I am not kicked out only because I have tenure.

TwoScoopsPlissken says
switching institutions for a lateral $20k pay raise

My dear friend, you are so quaint and old-fashioned. Nowadays it is a lateral move with 100-200K salary increase.
7   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 14, 1:28pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

According to the link, all the multimillionaire salaries are going to coaches, not professors or even administrators.

Students must often pay for these various athletic programs (especially title 9 ones) with added fees into the thousands per year. Whether or not they ever attend a game.

Then when they graduate, they can continue paying for athletics with their cable bill dollars whether or not they choose to watch sports.

See a pattern yet?
Sports is subsidized by the 75% of people who pay no attention to sports at all.
8   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 14, 2:20pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

drB6 says
Classroom instruction is very cheap
And most done by adjuncts who have no chance at tenure and very few if any perks. Instruction is seen as one of the very last purposes of college.

Quigley says
all the multimillionaire salaries are going to coaches
I noticed that right off! Good grief! How many coaches do they need?
9   HeadSet   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 4:40pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

A few years ago, the U of VA President Teresa Sullivan decided to put all courses online and make them available for free (but with no credit). The Board of Visitors did not like this, and tried to have the president removed. I guess the President somehow got the wild idea that UVA was there to educate Virginians, and not just be a workfare for well paid academic staff.

In fact, the best way to cut college costs would be for all suitable courses to be online where the student can read, view, and review lectures. The lectures could be enhanced with any sort of graphic teaching tools. Tests could then be centrally proctored. For courses like English, history, geography, and others that need no labs, why not? Of course, something similar could have been done years ago using DVDs, but I do not think affordable education is on the agenda for those running universities.
10   mell   ignore (2)   2018 Apr 14, 5:07pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HeadSet says
A few years ago, the U of VA President Teresa Sullivan decided to put all courses online and make them available for free (but with no credit). The Board of Visitors did not like this, and tried to have the president removed. I guess the President somehow got the wild idea that UVA was there to educate Virginians, and not just be a workfare for well paid academic staff.

In fact, the best way to cut college costs would be for all suitable courses to be online where the student can read, view, and review lectures. The lectures could be enhanced with any sort of graphic teaching tools. Tests could then be centrally proctored. For courses like English, history, geography, and others that need no labs, why not? Of course, something similar could have been done years ago using DVDs, but I do not think affordable education is on the agenda for those running universities.


In tech this has long happened. CS degrees may be for higher or mixed purposes (Electrical engineering, (bio-)Medical engineering) etc. but for 80% of the code that needs to be written out there you can self-learn without paying a dime for education. Even the bootcamps, while more practically oriented, are mostly scams. All the info you need is on the web. Universities will be mostly obsolete at some point. But you can be sure they will put up a good fight so don't count on it right now.
11   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 6:41pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

drB6 says
Side product of this stupidity is that lower middle class people who genuinely want and need education often can not get it because it is too expensive and they might not qualify for subsidies. I am faculty and I can not change any of this. Only thing I get when I bring this up to administration is that I am not a team player followed by ignoring what I said. And I am not kicked out only because I have tenure.


The lower middle class always has the option of living at home, working, and doing as much as possible at an inexpensive community college then finishing up in their state school system (or canada, germany, argentina, etc. much more cheaply). But the whole get into the best college you can brainwashing starting at age 5 works so well almost no one considers it.
12   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 6:46pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

HeadSet says
In fact, the best way to cut college costs would be for all suitable courses to be online where the student can read, view, and review lectures. The lectures could be enhanced with any sort of graphic teaching tools. Tests could then be centrally proctored. For courses like English, history, geography, and others that need no labs, why not? Of course, something similar could have been done years ago using DVDs, but I do not think affordable education is on the agenda for those running universities.


Such a program has existed for a long time. It's called CLEP. Just register for 1 course a semester at a college that accepts CLEP (almost all do) so you have some where for credits to go to. . Pick a CLEP course, pick up the textbook, study your brains out ,then take the test for $50.If you pass the college gets the results and the credits go on your transcript just like you took the course at the college. Move on to another course and CLEP again. Rinse, lather, repeat until you run out of courses that are applicable. If nothing else you can get the whole bullshit core curriculum disposed of.
13   bob2356   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 6:49pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

mell says

In tech this has long happened. CS degrees may be for higher or mixed purposes (Electrical engineering, (bio-)Medical engineering) etc. but for 80% of the code that needs to be written out there you can self-learn without paying a dime for education. Even the bootcamps, while more practically oriented, are mostly scams. All the info you need is on the web. Universities will be mostly obsolete at some point. But you can be sure they will put up a good fight so don't count on it right now.



Very true except 1 small problem. Try to get your resume past human services without the degree. Good luck. They will have 100 applicants for the position with degrees and your resume will be circular filed. It's all part of the higher education scam. Shoe salesman and people putting twinkies on store shelves need degrees now to get hired.
14   dr6B   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 14, 8:58pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

bob2356 says
doing as much as possible at an inexpensive community college


In class which I teach, students who took prerequisite at community college have 60% failure rate. They will get passed with high grades at CC even if they know nothing. As a consequence, no one in his sane mind would hire a CC graduate as they learn absolutely nothing. Perhaps taking history or similar courses at CC is fine, but not math, physics, chemistry. I do not know about computer science.
bob2356 says
finishing up in their state school system

I teach in state school system. Tuition is 11K/year, and I see a lot of lower middle class students really struggling with finances. System is royally screwed up.




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