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2   WarrenTheApe   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 20, 1:26pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

That's a laugh in how SV broke itself. NIMBYism doesn't exist in some vacuum.

And we see it in how they are 'breaking' Nevada and Arizona. Reminds me of Bill Peet's children book "The Wump World"...with California leftists being the Pollutians wrecking one world after another and won't change but just go and find another world.

3   SFace   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 20, 2:06pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I see Google campus, Spaceship and Saleforce DIldx towers popping up. Sammy wants their own 1M sq ft college too. If you have "CHOICE" in employers, that is a great thing. You go to Oregon, that's it, unless you can code for NIKE or change career and design shoes.

It's broken, but these are rich peoples problems and employers problems. And if its a rich people problem its not a problem. And we know for sure BA could care less a few out of too many start ups fails and leaves. 99 out of 100 cities want to have the highest housing price or bay area problems.
4   Hassan_Rouhani   ignore (2)   2018 Apr 20, 4:22pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

tovarichpeter says
$2500 a month would buy a luxurious RV.


.... and all the headaches which come with it. And it won't be in any way better (or bigger) than a studio. And it will lose 1/2 of it's value every 5 years (well-known rule of thumb for RVs).
5   Feux Follets   ignore (1)   2018 May 12, 3:53pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

As the cost of living continues to skyrocket, San Francisco Bay Area residents are fleeing the region in droves. In fact, San Francisco lost more residents than any other US city in the last quarter of 2017.

Compensation monitoring site Comparably narrowed it down to the 10 cities that are emerging as new tech hubs. Comparably also compiled the local salaries of some of the most popular tech jobs by analyzing more than 8,000 anonymized salary records from employees at U.S. tech companies.

Here are the 10 emerging tech hubs from around the country, along with what local employees make each year.

Atlanta, Georgia is home to Coca-Cola, UPS, and Home Depot, but it's also becoming a tech hot-spot.

Here are the average salaries in Atlanta:

Junior developer: $68,330

Developer: $86,214

Senior developer: $112,573

IT Manager: $120,695

Project Manager: $102,390

Sales representative: $113,576

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,010 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,160 per month.

Baltimore, Maryland is surrounded by several universities, and its tech talent pool rose 42% between 2010 and 2013.
rose 42% between 2010 and 2013." >

Here are the average salaries in Baltimore:

Junior developer: $70,925

Developer: $96,290

Senior developer: $124,201

IT Manager: $115,927

Project Manager: $104,853

Sales representative: $126,255

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $940 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,180 per month.

Boulder, Colorado continues to attract tech talent and venture capital funding from major cities across the US.

Here are the average salaries in Boulder:

Junior developer: $69,013

Developer: $90,688

Senior developer: $123,027

IT Manager: $105,123

Project Manager: $102,168

Sales representative: $107,925

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,140 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,400 per month.

The tech scene in Chicago, Illinois is starting to pick up — in fact, it was recently ranked as one of the top tech innovation hubs in the world by KPMG.

Here are the average salaries in Chicago:

Junior developer: $71,404

Developer: $89,366

Senior developer: $120,018

IT Manager: $117,726

Project Manager: $108,383

Sales representative: $110,806

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,070 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,260 per month.

Austin may be known as a top startup city, but Dallas, Texas was recently ranked as the 11th most-high tech city in the world.
11th most-high tech city in the world."

Here are the average salaries in Dallas:

Junior developer: $70,664

Developer: $84,525

Senior developer: $113,278

IT Manager: $121,326

Project Manager: $106,848

Sales representative: $112,605

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $880 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,100 per month.

Denver, Colorado is consistently ranked one of the best places to live in the US, which has contributed to its steadily growing tech scene.
one of the best places to live in the US, which has contributed to its steadily growing tech scene."

Here are the average salaries in Denver:

Junior developer: $68,748

Developer: $90,761

Senior developer: $122,929

IT Manager: $103,927

Project Manager: $102,013

Sales representative: $108,979

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,040 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,310 per month.

Minneapolis, Minnesota is a home base for giants like UnitedHealth and Medtronic, which is contributing to the city's thriving health-tech startup scene.

Here are the average salaries in Minneapolis:

Junior developer: $66,481

Developer: $85,078

Senior developer: $112,261

IT Manager: $118,573

Project Manager: $107,196

Sales representative: $115,512

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $900 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,140 per month.

Phoenix, Arizona has one of the largest tech labor pools in the country. Plus, the city's higher tech wages and lower office rates are contributing to the tech scene's growth. Higher tech wages and lower office rates are contributing to the tech scene's growth."

Here are the average salaries in Phoenix:

Junior developer: $72,108

Developer: $85,216

Senior developer: $116,027

IT Manager: $96,781

Project Manager: $88,894

Sales representative: $96,157

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $820 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,030 per month.

Portland, Oregon — nicknamed the Silicon Forest — continues to attract top tech talent and was named Forbes' best place for business and careers last year. Forbes' best place for business and careers last year."

Here are the average salaries in Portland:

Junior developer: $68,608

Developer: $87,328

Senior developer: $118,002

IT Manager: $117,856

Project Manager: $98,737

Sales representative: $92,473

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,130 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,330 per month.

Washington, D.C. boasts some of the most educated residents in the US, and ranks as one of the best places in the country to start a business.
best places in the country to start a business."

Here are the average salaries in Washington, D.C.:

Junior developer: $71,186

Developer: $96,087

Senior developer: $125,370

IT Manager: $118,886

Project Manager: $105,319

Sales representative: $131,598

According to Comparably, the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,310 per month, while a two-bedroom will run you $1,510 per month.

http://www.businessinsider.com/san-francisco-housing-so-expensive-alternative-tech-cities-salary-data-2018-5#

Link to Comparably: https://www.comparably.com/

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6   mell   ignore (1)   2018 May 12, 4:16pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Feux Follets says
As the cost of living continues to skyrocket, San Francisco Bay Area residents are fleeing the region in droves. In fact, San Francisco lost more residents than any other US city in the last quarter of 2017.


You post important topics but IMO often draw the wrong conclusions. SV is a leftist paradise and that is the only reason it has come to this, ordinary people - which are also regular developers - are taxed to the hilt, raped by federal, state taxes followed by municipal fees and quasi taxes tacked on everything while the ultra-rich and those who have a family monopoly on houses (old-timers) are being protected by any means, as well as fattest salaries for municipal and state gov workers, pensions north of 200K/yr (even 400K was reported) are common, devouring all taxpayer money while letting the city rot to shit. They are literally strangling any upward mobility besides either hitting the jackpot at one of the early startups (veery poor odds) or working 2-3 jobs minimum. Nobody works harder against equal opportunity to prosperity than the left, esp. in SV/SF. You don't have to like Trump, but you should at least be a Libertarian if you want shit like that to change.
7   Feux Follets   ignore (1)   2018 May 12, 4:30pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

@mell - No longer doing time in California.

There was another piece I was working on earlier today that I misplaced covering the ridiculous cost of living in California compared to other states. If I can locate it, I will post it.

Moving out of state was a massive salary increase for me without bringing in one more dime.

The California I first saw back in the early 90s is long gone, never coming back.

Not in any disagreement with your commentary on taxes, the pensions, any of it. California is not alone on the pension debacle either.

Even more bizarre is the trumpeting of the "surplus" Moonbeam has in Sacramento. There is no surplus of anything for anything, if the deficits for CalSTRS and CalPRES are added into the equation.

No La-La land projects are being scrapped - the tunnels, the train, whatever - it's all an illusion of prosperity.

More attention ought to be paid to where the potable water is going to come from (especially SoCal) - this is a fight where no one will really win and everyone will lose in one way or another..
8   Booger   ignore (0)   2018 May 12, 6:04pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Senior developers make more than IT managers???




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