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What about a tax to bring down the cost of housing

By tovarichpeter following x   2018 May 2, 7:08pm 948 views   13 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


https://www.seattletimes.com/business/amazon/amazon-pauses-plans-for-seattle-office-towers-while-city-council-considers-business-tax/


Seattle is considering a head tax on big tech firms that have made housing unaffordable there. It could raise millions for affordable housing but even more importantly it could apply the brakes on the high paying tech jobs that cause higher rents and home prices (and traffic). Those new jobs won’t die but will simply go to other cities that have plenty of housing but need more good paying jobs.
1   Tenpoundbass   ignore (11)   2018 May 2, 7:11pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I say a National property tax on all rental units.
2   TrumpingTits   ignore (0)   2018 May 2, 7:21pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tenpoundbass says
I say a National property tax on all rental units.

Not possible w/o amending the Constitution*. Exactly like we had to for the income tax (16th amendment):
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.


* Well, possible but not practical both in collecting it or politically. Congress can impose such a tax, but must do so according to the Apportionment Clause. This is because a property tax is a Direct Tax. So is the Income Tax, but as you read in the above, the 16th amendment carves out an exemption for the Apportionment Clause to apply for that particular direct tax.

What this means is that the property owners living in Wyoming would end up paying a lot, lot less in property taxes on rental properties than Californians would. Hence the 'not practical...politically'. As for 'collecting', that's an entirely long story I won't go into here but you can Google around about yourself.

Congress can impose taxes on income from rents w/o apportionment. Does so now. So they can impose higher ones, too. Congress could also impose a sales tax (indirect tax) on the transfer of title of property, too.

BTW, this little constitutional problem also applies to whenever you read a post by someone pushing for a national Land Value Tax (LVT) as well. Every time I see one of those, I post a reply similar to the one I am posting to you right now, only swapping out 'property tax' with 'LVT'. It is like hitting some poor ground hog's head with a weedwhacker...they have zero clue what I am talking about and don't like hearing more about it when they do start to get educated. Pisses all over their Georgism Narrative, see. And don't even get me started on non-Americans trying to understand.

Of course, there's nothing constitutionally stopping the states from imposing such tax on property in their jurisdiction. Most of them already have property taxes because of this very reason. Ditto with LVTs.
3   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (34)   2018 May 2, 7:29pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

But aren't housing valuations supposed to rise exponentially by the hour until a 3/2 in Vallejo absorbs all the wealth and energy in the universe?
4   Strategist   ignore (3)   2018 May 2, 7:34pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

tovarichpeter says
Seattle is considering a head tax on big tech firms that have made housing unaffordable there. It could raise millions for affordable housing but even more importantly it could apply the brakes on the high paying tech jobs that cause higher rents and home prices (and traffic). Those new jobs won’t die but will simply go to other cities that have plenty of housing but need more good paying jobs.


It's just another silly payroll tax. Don't cities want to attract more businesses so they can get more in taxes?
Just allow more home construction, morons.
5   TrumpingTits   ignore (0)   2018 May 2, 7:35pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Strategist says
It's just another silly payroll tax. Don't cities want to attract more businesses so they can get more in taxes?
Just allow more home construction, morons.


Path of least resistance. NIMBYs will fight the latter option tooth and nail but not care what effect is has on anyone ELSE's future, so could care less about taxing businesses/jobs.
6   Strategist   ignore (3)   2018 May 2, 7:38pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tenpoundbass says
I say a National property tax on all rental units.


Landlords would just pass it on to the renters making housing even more expensive.
If they are not allowed to pass it on to renters with rent control, landlords won't buy rental properties creating a further shortage and more hardship for many.
Take your pick.
7   Strategist   ignore (3)   2018 May 2, 7:42pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says
But aren't housing valuations supposed to rise exponentially by the hour


They are supposed to, but all the whining just gives everyone a headache. It's terrible.
8   DASKAA   ignore (3)   2018 May 2, 10:27pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

#fucktaxes
#tea
10   SFace   ignore (0)   2018 May 3, 11:01pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Amazon could easily move to Bellevue.

It's not about Amazon's ability to pay, its their responsibilities to shareholders. If you haven't noticed, every city wants hq2. They can just as easily move hq1
11   mell   ignore (2)   2018 May 3, 11:10pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WarrenTheApe says
Not possible w/o amending the Constitution*. Exactly like we had to for the income tax (16th amendment):
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.


* Well, possible but not practical both in collecting it or politically. Congress can impose such a tax, but must do so according to the Apportionment Clause. This is because a property tax is a Direct Tax. So is the Income Tax, but as you read in the above, the 16th amendment carves out an exemption for the Apportionment Clause to apply for that particular direct tax.


It's totally possible since we abandoned the rule of law. According to the constitution the bailouts, the fucking over of GM and other bondholders, Obummercare and more should never have been possible. But US administrations have stopped caring about the constitution long ago and installing their puppets if challenged in SC. Totally possible these days though theoretically you're right ;)
12   anotheraccount   ignore (1)   2018 May 4, 12:03am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

SFace says
They can just as easily move hq1


No they can't. What do you think would happen to the prices of houses that their employees own if they moved?
13   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (34)   2018 May 4, 12:56am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Amazon needs to muster its employee s to take up arms against the tyrannous govt of Seattle!




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