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1   Patrick   ignore (1)   2018 Aug 9, 7:31am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Thanks @georgeliberte excellent article.

What they were getting from these lectures and discussions, often lengthy and often on arcane subjects, was perhaps the only sustained argument against identity politics they had heard in their lives.

That might seem like a small thing, but it’s not. With identity politics off the table, it was possible to talk about all kinds of things—religion, philosophy, history, myth—in a different way. They could have a direct experience with ideas, not one mediated by ideology. All of these young people, without quite realizing it, were joining a huge group of American college students who were pursuing a parallel curriculum, right under the noses of the people who were delivering their official educations.

Because all of this was happening silently, called down from satellites and poured in through earbuds—and not on campus free-speech zones where it could be monitored, shouted down, and reported to the appropriate authorities—the left was late in realizing what an enormous problem it was becoming for it.
2   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Aug 9, 7:33am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

It’s sad when discussion of ideas is banned by promoters of ideology. Last time it was this bad was the Spanish Inquisition.
3   Patrick   ignore (1)   2018 Aug 9, 8:58am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

That was Europe centuries ago.

In the Islamic countries in the present, discussion of ideas is banned by promoters of ideology all the time, with the threat of extreme violence to back it up. Saudi Arabia is a prime example. See the case of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raif_Badawi


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