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Teacher fired for refusing to give 50% credit to students who didn't even do their homework

By Patrick following x   2018 Sep 25, 5:47pm 523 views   15 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6206667/Teacher-says-fired-refusing-credit.html

A Florida history teacher says she was fired for refusing to give half-credit to students who didn't turn in their assignments - and now her farewell message to her class is going viral.

Diane Tirado says West Gate K-8 School in Port St Lucie had a 'no zero' policy, requiring teachers to give students no less than a 50-per cent grade on assignments.

Tirado, 52, tells television station WPTV that she was fired on September 14 when she refused to follow the policy after several students didn't turn in a homework project she had assigned two weeks earlier.


Seems to reflect the Democratic platform.
1   DASKAA   ignore (3)   2018 Sep 25, 6:03pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

She was standing in the way of the noble goal of "closing the achievement gap".
2   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (35)   2018 Sep 25, 6:04pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Which is exactly why the Comptroller of the Currency should be drawn from the crowd of Kazakhstani gangsters Trump trusts.
3   DASKAA   ignore (3)   2018 Sep 25, 6:14pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

What Would Marcus Do?
4   TwoScoopsOfSpaceForce   ignore (4)   2018 Sep 25, 6:17pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Saint Lucie County is F**ked up. Big League.

And Broward and Miami-Dade had the School Resource Officers ignore misdemeanors and find reasons to reclassify Felonies by Students as Misdemeanors.

That's how Trayvon got killed. Otherwise he'd be safely in Juvi after his burglary. Instead he got suspension and the School Police took the $$$ of Women's Gold Jewelry in his lock to the Lost and Found instead of Evidence Locker. Took the victims months and months to track down their stolen property.

"Look! Our Diversity, Tolerance, and Every Child a Winner policies are working! See the drop in HS Criminals!?"

5   Patrick   ignore (1)   2018 Sep 25, 8:04pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I mentioned this article to my wife, who is getting a teaching certificate, and she said it's pretty normal lately. The idea is to not discourage kids by getting their grades into a hole they cannot get out of. OK, point taken, but maybe missing a homework or two should not be so important as to sink your whole grade. And I think it really sends the wrong message to give something for nothing, not even effort.

She also said that people are considering alternate systems, like grading from 1 to 4 (I think it should be zero to 4). And not grading on a curve, but instead grading to standards of proficiency. If a kid learns the material, it should not matter whether the other kids learned more or less than he did. I agree with that.
6   FortWayne   ignore (2)   2018 Sep 25, 8:14pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Now that she is no longer working, she should get 50% of the paycheck for not working. After all, it's fair right?

Our schools are teaching our kids that being a loser it's ok, very forgiving system. And then kids grow up and life hits them very hard when no one gives credit for having a pulse. This is a lie, this does not prepare them for real life.

And grades don't mean shit anyway. You either can do a job, or you can't. No place looks at grades these days, meaningless shit anyway.
7   mell   ignore (2)   2018 Sep 25, 8:15pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Patrick says
I mentioned this article to my wife, who is getting a teaching certificate, and she said it's pretty normal. The idea is to not discourage kids by getting them into a hole they cannot get out of. OK, point taken, but maybe missing a homework or two should not be so important as to sink your whole grade. And I think it really sends the wrong message to give something for nothing, not even effort.

She also said that people are considering alternate systems, like grading from 1 to 4 (I think it should be zero to 4). And not grading on a curve, but instead grading to standards of proficiency. If a kid learns the material, it should not matter whether the other kids learned more or less than he did. I agree with that.


I think it's more about discipline than about grades or scoring. If someone already is a genius, why do they have to do homework? Well, because everyone has to do it, like in the military. And it's useful for most that are not that good. A lot of elementary schools do homework in their after-school program, which is not a bad idea, so when you pick up your kid in the early evening, homework is done. Also I think that you shouldn't standardize on everything, test material etc. of course but teachers should be free to apply their personal note of learning and homework grading etc. That's part of discipline and developing street smarts, to learn to cope with different teacher personalities (even with favoritism and the opposite to a certain degree) and teaching systems - that's a real world skill very useful later on. Big mistake by the schools IMO, but I'm not surprised since the heavily left leaning education system is very communist/cultural-marxist.
8   Hircus   ignore (0)   2018 Sep 25, 9:06pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Patrick says
And not grading on a curve, but instead grading to standards of proficiency. If a kid learns the material, it should not matter whether the other kids learned more or less than he did. I agree with that.


A good argument I've heard in favor of curve based grading is that a teacher may not teach the material well, or their test may not align well with the material they taught. With curve grading, student grades wont suffer much because most students will perform lower under such circumstances, and so the curve should help give you a grade that reflects your relative performance given the circumstances.

Of course, the specifics of how to curve is another topic. I had a great algorithms professor who had a terrific system IMO. He made the tests have a combination of easy questions, that almost all students should be able to get, then a few moderate difficulty questions, and then a few very very difficult questions that require great mastery and insight. Typical scores were around 30-50%. He would look at the score distribution and analyze it, looking for outliers (high and low) to discard. Once he established the main score distribution, he would create a curve while considering a base competency.

The bad part was that he had a magic wand....there was no specifics you could use to compute your own grade because so much of his curve selection was up to his judgment, but almost everyone felt he was fair and trustworthy.

I liked that this system:
-allowed him to set a floor where he determined minimum competency needed to get a passing grade.
-had typical benefits of a curve, allowing test question formulation deficiency and test/teaching mismatches to be mitigated.
-allowed truly awesome performers to be identified (You can only achieve this by making some of the test very very difficult)
-those who score very low and high didn't affect the curve.
-allows for you to miss some questions / details, but still get an A+ if your performance was otherwise good on other questions. This is key IMO.

Without curve grading, you may be a total expert at the topic, but if the test happens to contain a question that is some arbitrary trivia that you just don't happen to know/remember....boom, you cannot get 100%, which sucks - that's not a good test.

So, I really like curves when done well like above. But, I agree that curves need to also incorporate some base competency requirement too.
9   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2018 Sep 25, 10:53pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

They don't want schools shut down for non-performance. Keep those checks rolling in from the Gov. With few exceptions, most public schools are just a spin on the welfare racket now.
10   theoakman   ignore (0)   2018 Sep 26, 7:31am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Patrick says
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6206667/Teacher-says-fired-refusing-credit.html

A Florida history teacher says she was fired for refusing to give half-credit to students who didn't turn in their assignments - and now her farewell message to her class is going viral.

Diane Tirado says West Gate K-8 School in Port St Lucie had a 'no zero' policy, requiring teachers to give students no less than a 50-per cent grade on assignments.

Tirado, 52, tells television station WPTV that she was fired on September 14 when she refused to follow the policy after several students didn't turn in a homework project she had assigned two weeks earlier.


Seems to reflect the Democratic platform.


This is not news to me. I've taught in two very very wealthy suburbs in NJ. The environment that seems to permeate any fairly wealthy town is that new teachers are expected to give As to pretty much every kid or make it so extremely easy to obtain one. If not, the parents go over your head to your supervisor, principal, superintendent, or even board member. Any new teacher that tries to enforce rigorous standards is quickly "not renewed". It's a symptom of entitled psychotic parents and administrators who are paid way too much and will do anything to keep their job. Of course, once you obtain tenure, you can tell everyone to fuck off and teach the way you want.
11   theoakman   ignore (0)   2018 Sep 26, 7:37am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

If a kid is that smart and homework is a waste of time, I cut a deal with him/her and don't count it towards their grade. The reality is, homework, aside from it's purpose of improving the student retention of the material, is mostly given to improve a students grade. Kids bomb tests, but feel good when homework brings their average up. It's that simple. I guarantee you, the kids that complained are the laziest students and don't give a shit about learning the material at all. They deserve to fail, but in this day and age, there is no such thing as a child being left back a grade. Every kid I remember that had to repeat a grade made sure they never fucked up that bad again. I remember kids had to repeat 5th grade and few had to repeat 7th. They at least pulled C/Ds outta their ass so they could move on.
12   theoakman   ignore (0)   2018 Sep 26, 7:41am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Hircus says
Patrick says
And not grading on a curve, but instead grading to standards of proficiency. If a kid learns the material, it should not matter whether the other kids learned more or less than he did. I agree with that.


A good argument I've heard in favor of curve based grading is that a teacher may not teach the material well, or their test may not align well with the material they taught. With curve grading, student grades wont suffer much because most students will perform lower under such circumstances, and so the curve should help give you a grade that reflects your relative performance given the circumstances.

Of course, the specifics of how to curve is another topic. I had a great algorithms professor who had a terrific system IMO. He made the tests have a combination of easy questions, that almost all students should be able to get, then a few moderate difficulty questions, and t...


If a teacher doesn't teach the material well or the test doesn't align with the material taught, that's a good argument to fire the teacher. I curve a test if I made it too difficult or too long, it's that simple. Any good test should have a healthy mix of questions of varying difficulty. I would never announce a test is going to be curved prior to because it actively encourages kids to slack off and expect a hand out. As far as a student not knowing a little detail not being able to get 100%, that's the way it works. If you don't get every question right, you don't deserve a 100 if the material was taught and worked on. That's why we designate a 98 still as an A+. It's ok to get something wrong and you're not perfect unless you actually do get everything right.
13   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2018 Sep 26, 8:02am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Patrick says
Seems to reflect the Democratic platform.



Yes, because we all know what a positive influence REPUBLICANS have been on our great public education system.
14   d6rB   ignore (1)   2018 Sep 26, 9:02am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
Yes, because we all know what a positive influence REPUBLICANS have been on our great public education system.

No Child Left Behind (TM) was a nice socialist thing developed by Democrats...no...wait...it was REPUBLICANS!!!

P.S. I get that you are trolling :)
15   HEYYOU   ignore (21)   2018 Sep 26, 10:25am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

How many social promotions did Traitor get?




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