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Fraud


By surfer-x   Follow   Thu, 19 Jan 2006, 3:28am PST   4,840 views   177 comments   Watch (0)   Share   Quote   Permalink   Like   Dislike  

At this stage of the game to imply there is no real estate bubble is akin to implying that the Pope isn't a Nazi*. Like Roe V. Wade it's "settled law"**. Ok, that's all fine and dandy, but the game can be kept alive by committing one simple act that your average McDebtor Swaggering Boomer (MDSB) has embraced, fraud. So your neighbor just bought the '06 H2? You want one also, what's a boomer to do? Just go to the house ATM well, why not, as super-savvy investors the average MDSB knows full well that RE only goes up, so they get their house appraised for yet another cash out refi, what's this Chuck, no appreciation? MDSB tells the loan broker who relies on fees to buy his '06 H2, no refi for the MDSB, no new H2 for the loan broker. Loan broker "recommends" this other appraiser who's more "in tune" to what the market is doing. The appraisal magically goes up and the MDSB gets his free money. Works great, as the FED and HeliBen can just print non-stop and the greenback isn't really worth anything, at best it's a shared hallucination. This from the Federal Reserve site Federal Reserve notes are not redeemable in gold, silver or any other commodity, and receive no backing by anything This has been the case since 1933. The notes have no value for themselves, but for what they will buy. In another sense, because they are legal tender, Federal Reserve notes are "backed" by all the goods and services in the economy.

How much longer can the house of cards be supported by fraud? Remember the boomers are adverse to work, and will readily accept fraud as long as it gets them more time at the bong.

*The interjection of personal political rubbish is not particularly appreciated by everyone, especially the occasional lurker. The Pope isn't a Nazi. When he was a teenager he was required by law to belong to Hitler Youth. All the kids in his country were. He later defected, and fought the Nazis, I am an idiot. They were all just "following orders".

**Obviously the "occasional lurker" (not you Prat :) ) cannot or does not seem willing to keep up with current events and the radical shift going on in the Supreme Court. These are arrogant boomers (Scalito) that will be with us for a very very long time.

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Girgl   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 4:09am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 138

Folks, please excuse my ignorance and define "Boomer" and "Gen-X" for me.
What's the year of birth after which one is no longer Boomer scum?
I need to find out whether I can yammer and rant about the evil boomers, or whether I'm one myself.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 4:20am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 139

Generation X is a term used in demographics, the social sciences, and more broadly in popular culture. It generally consists of persons born in the 1960s and 1970s, although the exact dates of birth defining this age demographic are highly debated. It has also been described as a generation consisting of those people whose "teen years touched the 1980s", born after baby boomers.

Stated very simply, the demographers, sociologists and the media define baby boomers as those born between (and including) 1946 and 1964. ...

surfer-x   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 4:55am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 140

Folks, please excuse my ignorance and define "Boomer" and "Gen-X" for me. What's the year of birth after which one is no longer Boomer scum?
I need to find out whether I can yammer and rant about the evil boomers, or whether I'm one myself.

There is much controvery on this, my defination is the best, if your Father fought or could have fought in WWII you are a boomer. If your Grandfather fought or could have fought in WWII and your Father fought or could have fought in Nam, you are gen-x, if your grandfather fought and could have fought in WWII and your father was too young for Nam, you are gen-y.

surfer-x   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 5:14am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 141

In short, it's HOW you were brought up, not WHEN you were born.

The first half is correct, but the second half is contradictatory, when you were born usually determines how you were brought up. If your Father is a boomer who went to nam or is a member of the forgotten generation you likely were brought up correctly, ie the drug lecture you got. If you father was a flower loving trend sucking boomer you were likely brought up in second generation entitlement, where your parents wanted to be your friends. There should not be democracy in a household. At best it should be a benovelent dictatorship.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:21am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 142

Someone just sent me this link to a rather scary web page predicting economic collapse. I don’t know anything about this site or the veracity/plausibility of the info, but I’d be interested in reading people’s opinions.

Probably written by a tin-foil hat.

Why would GB want to stop Iran from trading oil from Euro?

The US is no longer on a gold standard. Why would the government care if its citizens own precious metal or not?

Statutory debt limit can get raised.

The author probably also believes that there was some conspiracy behind 9/11.

Girgl   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:21am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 143

surfer-x says:
There is much controvery on this, my defination is the best, if your Father fought or could have fought in WWII you are a boomer. If your Grandfather fought or could have fought in WWII and your Father fought or could have fought in Nam, you are gen-x, if your grandfather fought and could have fought in WWII and your father was too young for Nam, you are gen-y.

Nice. I like it.
Makes me a Gen-Xer. :-)

All I can say is there's truth on both sides of the argument.

I'd argue that when the boomers were young, life sucked just as hard for them on average as it may suck for the Xers and Yers today. The old men had all the money back then just the same as they have it right now (of course, the old men from back then are dead by now)

On the other hand, the demographic shift will obviously take away the handouts and freebies the boomers could enjoy.
Hey, my dad retired at age 55 in 1995. Using government unemployment benefits for 10 years along the way was part of the official early retirement package offered by his company. He got pretty defensive when I mentioned that this cannot be right, and that my generation will have to foot the bill for this antisocial bullsh*t. :-)
The Xers and Yers won't be bailed out by these pyramid scheme "benefits" and thus must aquire more skills and work harder so they don't end up being screwed. I see some devote a big portion of their 20s to video games, though. Good luck to those folks.

Anyway, I think in a few years from now the Xers and Yers will be the ones left laughing because they won't have lost nearly as much in the great unraveling, and at the end of it are still in their prime earning years.

FWIW, here's some anecdotal supporting evidence for the 1964 definition:

I remember that at high school graduation time in the early 80s, the folks born in '63 and earlier were *all* long haired pot-smoking hippies, and their graduation events were all about politics and rebellion against authority.
The folks born in '65 and later were *all* conservative, showed up in nice clothes, thanked parents and teachers, etc.
The '64ers were a mixed bag.
A pretty sharp transition. I'm curious whether someone on the blog experienced the same or similar pronounced cultural shifts for '64ers and younger?

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:25am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 144

Do you think China will continue to support a country’s economy (the U.S.) whose military launches a nuclear strike against its neighbor (Iran) - thus delivering a blanket of radioactive fallout over western Chinese provinces - killing hundreds of thousands, if not millions of its citizens?

See, this author assumes that there is going to be a nuclear strike. Why would the US nuke its oil reserve?

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:27am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 145

BsAsExpat

That website is whack. The flavor of the theme presented reflect in one of the comments "The Axis of Evil (read US, Israel and UK)..."

surfer-x   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:37am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 146

Shit the Army raised OCS limits to 42, lets go everyone :)

Randy H   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:42am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 147

Agreed with Peter P. The author is a big-time tin-foil, late-nite-am-radio conspiracy nut. Half of the contentions are false, most of the rest are ridiciulous.

Here's the direct evidence:

- plus, the whole "terrorist" thing is a cruel hoax perpetrated against a trusting citizenry - and only designed to instill fear and garner support for the genocide taking place in Iraq.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 6:46am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 148

- plus, the whole “terrorist” thing is a cruel hoax perpetrated against a trusting citizenry - and only designed to instill fear and garner support for the genocide taking place in Iraq.

Randy, there are people who actually believe that 9/11 was a conspiracy to gather support for the Iraq War.

Randy H   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 7:08am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 149

Randy, there are people who actually believe that 9/11 was a conspiracy to gather support for the Iraq War.

There are also people who believe that earth is flat, that we're living on the inside of a hollow earth, and that the amazing yappi can bend spoons with telekenetic mind vibrations.

Once upon a time we didn't equate opinions and beliefs with facts. I think it was called The Enlightenment and The Age of Reason. Apparently, judging from what passes as debate today, I missed that party.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 7:09am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 150

Sunnyvale_Renter

'Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean someone is not out to get you." We have been the ugly, hated Americans since the commies became popular after WW II. Every down trodden jealous, envious place in the world hates us. Most of those people want to live here in a heartbeat.

Would you want to be a muslim woman who may be burned in an "honor killing" and can not drive. How about China where the government owns ALL the land and you must pay for the bullet they use to execute you with if you don't end up as slave labor in jails. Or, how about in Northern Africa where they still practice slavery.

Let the vast populations of the world hate us. I don't me or mine living there.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 7:19am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 151

you must pay for the bullet they use to execute you with

Not nice... but much better than keeping death-row prisoners alive for decades. It is cruelty to the taxpayers.

I heard that China is moving towards lethal injection. I think it is sad. Execution is supposed to be noisy. It should not be made like a medical procedure.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 7:20am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 152

Same old troll.

surfer-x   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 8:47am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 153

Same old troll.

Ah yes, but I've got a huge can of troll-b-gone

KurtS   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 11:40am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 154

Execution is supposed to be noisy. It should not be made like a medical procedure.

I think it will be worse when they'll be able to plant a chip in your head set to "comply".

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 11:46am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 155

Oil price rising because Kuwait has less?

According to ReutersUpdate [2006-1-21 2:25:16 by Stuart Staniford], the Petroleum Intelligence Weekly story :

"PIW learns from sources that Kuwait's actual oil reserves, which are officially stated at around 99 billion barrels, or close to 10 percent of the global total, are a good deal lower, according to internal Kuwaiti records," the weekly PIW reported on Friday.

It said that according to data circulated in Kuwait Oil Co (KOC), the upstream arm of state Kuwait Petroleum Corp, Kuwait's remaining proven and non-proven oil reserves are about 48 billion barrels.
Officials from KOC were not immediately available for comment to Reuters. PIW said the official public Kuwaiti figures do not distinguish between proven, probable and possible reserves.

But it said the data it had seen show that of the current remaining 48 billion barrels of proven and non-proven reserves, only about 24 billion barrels are so far fully proven -- 15 billion in its biggest oilfield Burgan.

That suggests Kuwait is at 47% of their ultimate recovery - so close to the half-way point. Future declines are projected to be modest based on the K of just over 4%.

San Francisco RENTER   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 1:54pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 156

"That suggests Kuwait is at 47% of their ultimate recovery - so close to the half-way point. Future declines are projected to be modest based on the K of just over 4%."

Hmmmm. Peak Oil here we come?

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 4:43pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 157

Being very poor means being very unhappy. Being very rich does not guarantee happiness.

Having a home, a car, health and dental insurance, college funding makes life better than not having them.

I am no guru but I know what makes me and my family materially content. Being emotionally content becomes more and more difficult when you are very poor.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 4:52pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 158

The American dream met a new economic change in the early 1970's when inflation pushed the price of houses up. The housewife became the working wife and DINKs (dual income no kids) becames a significant portion of American life.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 5:12pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 159

Families morphed from single earners able to buy a house into dual earners able to buy a house into only a few dual earners able to buy a house. All societies change and adapting always requires change. The American society has changed rapidly since the 1970's.

The next change may well be a deflationary depression making our present day complaints seem like the whining of immature teenagers. This country has seen 4 depressions, many inflations, many wars. The poor have alway existed amongst the rest and always will; proverty will never disappear.

I hope to take advantage of history repeating and not be the victim of it.

Unalloyed   befriend   ignore   Sat, 21 Jan 2006, 8:04pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 160

The Greatest Generation said "we'll open trade with China."
The Boomers said "we'll invest in China."
And the result was a prison population of 15 million living a hellish slave existence making product for the U.S. market.
The Boomers are guilty of promoting slavery on a staggering scale.

Michael Holliday   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 1:17am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 161

Unalloyed Says:

"The Greatest Generation said 'we’ll open trade with China.'
The Boomers said 'we’ll invest in China.'
And the result was a prison population of 15 million living a hellish slave existence making product for the U.S. market.
The Boomers are guilty of promoting slavery on a staggering scale."

Yes! Great post, and nice social conscience. Lao Gai prison camps in China are the moral and physical equivalent to the Gulag slave labor camps in the former Soviet Union. I talk about this on my radio show.

Late B(L)oomer Says:

"The problem with these Gen Xer’s is that they are much too lazy. They spent their childhood sitting on a couch playing video games...Their parents would tell them to get of their ass and do something besides playing Xbox or Playstation 2. Go outside and do something. Get some exercise. Do some work. Instead they just set there getting more lazy and fat."

I agree. Gen-X isn't known, and not always affectiontely, as the "slacker" generation for nothing. We earned that sobriquet the hard way: by eating canned raviolis, Cheetos and drinking Coke with Pac Man and Space Invaders joysticks in our hands.

I must admit, in-between serving in the military, getting a BS and MBA
I did slack a little here and there, as evidenced by the kick back pace in which I acquired my formal schooling, my mediocre undergraduate grades (I got good grades in grad school), and the checkered path to those "accomplishments" (no big deal).

But what of it?

Afterall, I was living in California during the good days, with plenty of fun diversions like Marriots Great America and the beach. Besides, we had more important things to do like drinking Cali Coolers and boogieboarding.

For us, Silicon Valley jobs were always there waiting for us when we got our individual and collective act together. Little did we know, on the continent of Asia, major changes were brewing.

Late B(L)oomer: "Now they are unhappy and frustrated because they’re realizing adult realities. You’ve got to work your ass off and have the balls to take a chance. Many of the Xer’s are pathetic cry babies that spend their time looking for someone to blame (the boomers) for their pathetic existences."

Well, the game has changed dramatically. Sure, probably one out of three Gen-X'ers is a perpetual, life-long slacker, but look at his hippy ass parent role models? Smoking weed with your kids to the point of self-induced economic and social passivity is not a good way to inculcate the virtues of hard-work, and economic self-sufficiency (not to mention...thrift).

One actually has to have one's wits about him to navigate in today's complex work environment. Unlike the inefficient paper office of the 70s, where simply by showing up--and not always on time--stoned, you could blend into the hazy corporate culture of mutual inertia. Today, one's actoins are under constant electronic, high-tech surveillance via the web, phone, nosy managers, and Cubicle Sam and Samatha sitting in the shitbox next to you since nobody, save a few, has an office anymore.

I think Gen-X is in an internecine struggle. It seems bifurcated between the late sixties Gen-X'ers that didn't have Boomer parents, and the newer 70's and early 80's crop (Gen-X/Y?) that had Boomer parents. Hence the bicameral difference in termperament, work ethic, values, etc. between the early and late X-'ers.

However, for Gen-X Californians especially, it's hard to escape the tides of history much less the tides of Santa Cruz beach and boardwalk. Many of the people I know spent most of their Senior year in high school, like me, at the beach boogie boarding and drinking Cali Coolers.

Such is life!

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 2:42am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 162

TV's channel 9 Alan Mendelson last night gushing over the "NEW" mortgage product: 40 and 45 year fix rate loans. He compared the standard 30 year loan to the 40 and 45, the monthly payment different was only a few hundred bucks. What he didn't mention was the huge amount of additional interest to be paid out.

In Japan, at the top in 1990, 100 year mortgages were used called 3 generation mortgages.

Gen-X's children will have to work to help pay these work til you die mortgages.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 2:55am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 163

The Boomers will have to work till the die anyways: Pensions disappear, social security remains a Ponzi scheme, personal savings nears zero, family wealth resides in home equity which has been spent through MEW's (mortgage equity withdrawls), income falls below inflation.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 3:02am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 164

Here, find foreclosures everywhere, an awesome free website:

http://s148729583.onlinehome.us/

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 3:44am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 165

When will the Panic come here???

Fund companies and financial advisers on Thursday warned of an atmosphere of panic and hysteria as a third German open-ended property fund was closed following a run of withdrawals. KanAm, a Munich-based asset manager which on Tuesday froze its US fund after heavy outflows, said on Thursday it had been forced to close its core EU3.2bn global Grundinvest fund after EU700m of withdrawals in 24 hours.

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 3:49am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 166

Will Europe give us a Black Monday?

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 4:11am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 167

European proverty funds that were forced to close last week by redemptions will be forced to sell over a billion dollars in properties.

newsfreak   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 4:33am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 168

PolishKnight- Richard Nixon ended the draft because he had no choice.The country was coming apart at the seams,more so than you will ever know. Before the 1972 election 18 year olds could not vote you had to be 21.The average age of a combat soldier was 19. whats that tell you. And of course Ole tricky dick resigned not soon after because he was a liar,a racist, and a crook who was dumb enough to get caught. He did balance the books tho I will give him that. That miserable fucking war went on from the time I was in grade school until I graduated from college. And yes you could get a college exemption until 1972 when it was changed and then it was ended altogrther. And although John Kerry isn't my favorite politician he did volunteer for river duty in Mekong. It had to be scary as hell no way around it.I mean at least as scary as flying obsolete aircraft over the Gulf of Mexico.

Girgl   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 5:02am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 169

Late B(L)oomer says:
Quit your bitching and moaning. Sharpen your game. You are going to get your ass kicked by the competition you cowardly, sorry pieces of shit.

After reading your piece, rubbing my eyes, then reading it again a few times, I must say you're 100% right.

The only thing I can add is that this development is exactly the same in other Western industrialized countries, if not worse, and that the worst thing that can happen now is putting folks in power who transform their parenting mistakes into government policy and fail to give the wakeup call / ass-kicking.

Happens in Germany right now. The whole country is whining incessantly. You can't turn on the TV for 30 minutes without catching a feature denouncing the disadvantaging (i.e. cutting of the handouts) of some poor incapable slob, or one scaring the shit out of people because of peak oil, outsourcing, war, or whatever the scary proposition of the day is.
And the government caters to it. More than half of the country's budget goes to handouts now, tendency rising. What a sorry mess.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 5:03am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 170

European proverty funds

I like the term.

Proverty.

We will see this word more and more. :)

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 5:24am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 171

Housing is different...

The first to feel the declines in price are the sellers. The second ripple is the MEW's (mortgage equity withdrawl, home equity loans, HELOC's, etc) which depresses renovations and major purchase. The foreclosure and REO's come third because the laws give months and months of grace period. Oh, did I mention the defaulting mortgage backed bonds,etc.

The progression of housing collapse remains an assest class different from other assests. Housing differs but not in a good way.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 5:41am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 172

I don’t know, I read some of the other articles on the site and they don’t seem so whack. e.g.:

http://bellaciao.org/en/article.php3?id_article=9936

This article doesn’t seem unreasonable, plus the author was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the Reagan administration.

Comparing Bush to Hitler is out of whack I would day. I think somehow the author really does not like Bush and is trying to fearmonger people into disliking him.

Peter P   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 5:45am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 173

Also, I believe the author is a smart person. IF he really believes that Bush is becoming another Hitler, he would not have risked being put into "protective custody" in the future by revealing the "secret", no?

This is why I believe that he is just fearmongering. I just do not understand why some people hate Bush so much?

jeffolie   befriend   ignore   Sun, 22 Jan 2006, 7:20am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 174

MAIN STREET MEDIA very, very, very, very liberal

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP)--A first-of-its-kind look at media bias, which included comparing news stories to congressional speeches, revealed that coverage by public television and radio is conservative compared to the rest of the mainstream media but that almost all major media outlets are liberal.

“While the editorial page of The Wall Street Journal is conservative, the newspaper’s news pages are liberal, even more liberal than The New York Times,” the study found, according to a Dec. 14 news release by the University of California-Los Angeles, which conducted the research. “The Drudge Report may have a right-wing reputation, but it leans left.”

The study, which appears in the latest issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics, is believed to be the first successful attempt at objectively quantifying bias in a range of media outlets and ranking them accordingly, the news release said.

“I suspected that many media outlets would tilt to the left because surveys have shown that reporters tend to vote more Democrat than Republican,” Tim Groseclose, a UCLA political scientist and the study’s lead author, said. “But I was surprised at just how pronounced the distinctions are.”

Researchers incorporated a method used by Americans for Democratic Action, which tracks the percentage of times that each lawmaker votes on the liberal side of an issue. ADA then assigns a numerical score to each lawmaker, where 100 is the most liberal and 0 is the most conservative. The average ADA score in Congress, which is 50.1, is assumed to represent the political position of the average U.S. voter.

UCLA then enlisted 21 research assistants to examine U.S. media coverage for the past decade and tally the number of times each media outlet referred to think tanks and policy groups such as the left-leaning NAACP or the conservative Heritage Foundation. The same was done with speeches of members of Congress, and the process took nearly three years to complete.

Of the 20 major media outlets UCLA studied, 18 scored left of center, with The Wall Street Journal, CBS Evening News, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times leading the pack, the research indicated. Only Fox News’ “Special Report with Brit Hume” and The Washington Times scored right of the average U.S. voter. Of the print media, USA Today was the most centrist.

News that the Drudge Report was slightly left of center surprised some.

“One thing people should keep in mind is that our data for the Drudge Report was based almost entirely on the articles that the Drudge Report lists on other websites,” Groseclose said. “Very little was based on the stories that Matt Drudge himself wrote. The fact that the Drudge Report appears left of center is merely a reflection of the overall bias of the media.”

For more information, visit http://newsroom.ucla.edu/.

KurtS   befriend   ignore   Mon, 23 Jan 2006, 3:48am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 175

why some people hate Bush so much?

Now, here's a topic destined to polarize a blog (on real estate)! :)

What can be said about The Shrub that hasn't been said before?
It's easy to find fault with the person, but the real issue is policy/decision.

:twisted: Sometimes I wish those old days, when kings tasted battle, gore, and death first-hand. That might give " " some needed gravitas :twisted:

KurtS   befriend   ignore   Mon, 23 Jan 2006, 6:49am PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 176

Doesn’t it appear rather juvenile to play name games? Or going nuts because he says “nukular?” It sounds like kindergarden playground nonsense.

Humor is a healthy release. Seems some can't handle any digs on the POTUS.
For the record, I mocked Clinton as well.

Unalloyed   befriend   ignore   Mon, 23 Jan 2006, 5:24pm PST   Share   Quote   Like   Dislike     Comment 177

thisis it.

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