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Why Drive In Snow If you Don't Know How To?

By WookieMan follow WookieMan   2018 Jan 17, 3:39pm 4,141 views   22 comments   watch   nsfw   quote   share    


#baddrivers

http://www.sportingnews.com/nascar/news/dale-earnhardt-jr-nascar-car-crashes-snowstorm-twitter-2018/1ke5e945ut2si1kapmwspj9rp9
How many people here have never driven on snow? I just don't get the difficulty some people have. Just slow the fuck down and don't be an idiot.
1   NoCoupForYou   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 17, 3:48pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

You'd be shocked. There was decent snowfall of a few inches in the Willamette Valley once and 90% of the people were trying to drive normally and sliding all over the place. It was insane. They literally had no clue how to drive in snow.
2   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 17, 3:59pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Shouldn't it be common sense that snow, once packed down from tires, is ice for the most part? And that you can't drive the same speed on ice versus asphalt? While it doesn't snow much in the south, it snows on enough occasions that everyone should have a healthy respect for snow once it does come.

I'm convinced 80% of people, educated or not, are simple idiots.
3   Liberal_in_blackface   ignore (6)   2018 Jan 17, 4:01pm     ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

The behavior of a car in the snow is basically the same as behavior of a car at very high speeds on dry warm tarmac (ignoring aero for simplicity). The same stuff which happens on dry pavement at, say, 120mph happens at 30-40mph in the snow. If you don't have proper tires for the conditions the limits shift even lower. So, basically, if you're good high-speed dry pavement driver you should have no problem driving on dirt or snow, because it's basically the same shit: driving near the limit of available traction. So I'm surprised that professional racecar driver has a problem with some snow on the road.
4   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 4:16pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
The behavior of a car in the snow is basically the same as behavior of a car at very high speeds on dry warm tarmac (ignoring aero for simplicity). The same stuff which happens on dry pavement at, say, 120mph happens at 30-40mph in the snow. If you don't have proper tires for the conditions the limits shift even lower. So, basically, if you're good high-speed dry pavement driver you should have no problem driving on dirt or snow, because it's basically the same shit: driving near the limit of available traction. So I'm surprised that professional racecar driver has a problem with some snow on the road.


Have you ever driven in snow?

30-40 is not slowing it down a bit.


The same stuff which happens on dry pavement at, say, 120mph happens at 30-40mph in the snow. If you don't have proper tires for the conditions the limits shift even lower. So, basically, if you're good high-speed dry pavement driver you should have no problem driving on dirt or snow, because it's basically the same shit: driving near the limit of available traction

That’s not really how it works, not to mention, driving (and stopping) at differing gradients.
5   Liberal_in_blackface   ignore (6)   2018 Jan 17, 4:18pm     ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

errc says

Have you ever driven in snow?


Yes. For many years. Starting in RWD cars without any electronic nannies.

Have you driven near the limit on a racetrack?
6   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 17, 4:30pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

It's not snow necessarily in my opinion. Yes, snow is the initial cause. But in areas with no plows or road salt, the snow gets crunched and packed down. It essentially becomes ice. No level of driving skill, except driving on conditions close to ice can prepare you for this scenario. Your car will keep going in the same direction it started going whether you're applying the brakes, turning the wheel or have the best winter tires ever made (winter tires will help, but on ice, the difference between tires is minuscule).

You (anyone driving on icy conditions) just have to chill the fuck out or not go out. And don't get me wrong, we get snow every year here in Chicagoland and people apparently don't have fucking brains and cannot drive on it 9 months later when the first snow hits.
7   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 5:33pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

The rubber on a standard tire will also harden up and lose some of its grip under cold conditions. The snow tires are made of a softer compound which doesn't do this.

On ice, use studded tires. Not much else can help. In some areas you are allowed to use tire chains.
8   BlueSardine   ignore (3)   2018 Jan 17, 6:01pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

To learn how to.

WookieMan says
Why Drive In Snow If you Don't Know How To?
9   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 17, 6:30pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

BlueSardine says
To learn how to.

WookieMan says
Why Drive In Snow If you Don't Know How To?

Nope. Not in Alabama, Louisiana, Florida, Georgia, Carolina's, etc. They don't have the equipment to make it safe for drivers that have zero clue how to drive in those conditions. They should know better. When a Nascar driver is crashing, someone who regularly pushes the limits of physics in a vehicle, get off the road if you don't know what you're doing in those conditions.

It's harsh, but maybe it's a good thing the south gets these winter storms every 5 years or so. Some people get the Darwin award and drive like dip shits. I suppose it's better than them living until 80 and having to pay their SS benefits?
10   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 7:23pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Satoshi_Nakamoto says
So, basically, if you're good high-speed dry pavement driver you should have no problem driving on dirt or snow, because it's basically the same shit: driving near the limit of available traction. So I'm surprised that professional racecar driver has a problem with some snow on the road.


You're assuming Dale Earnhardt is a good high speed asphalt driver.

He's not.
11   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 7:24pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
When a Nascar driver is crashing, someone who regularly pushes the limits of physics in a vehicle, get off the road if you don't know what you're doing in those conditions.


They don't get snow that often in Charlotte.
12   Patrick   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 17, 7:28pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Coming from the upper Midwest, I learned to drive in snow. It's actually kinda fun to fishtail just a little bit to freak out the passengers.
13   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 17, 7:28pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

anon_ea75b says
WookieMan says
When a Nascar driver is crashing, someone who regularly pushes the limits of physics in a vehicle, get off the road if you don't know what you're doing in those conditions.


They don't get snow that often in Charlotte.

I know. Just a little scary that a "professional" driver couldn't handle it. A good chunk of our country does though and they're not "professional" drivers. All I'm getting at is if you're in a driving situation you don't know, get off the road. I get people have jobs and places to be, but don't fucking kill me in the process because you don't know ice is slippery.
14   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 8:20pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

We get about 4 months of winter every year. Blizzards, freezing rain, -30 temperatures. Despite this occurring every single year, it still takes a few weeks after the first snowfall for people to remember how to drive in it.
15   lostand confused   ignore (0)   2018 Jan 17, 9:33pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Patrick says
Coming from the upper Midwest, I learned to drive in snow. It's actually kinda fun to fishtail just a little bit to freak out the passengers.

Yeah one of my colleagues said when he was young, they used to spin on purpose in large empty parking lots for fun.
16   anonymous   ignore (null)   2018 Jan 17, 9:47pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

TwoScoopsPlissken says
in the Willamette Valley


I'm in the Umpqua Valley. Idiots here too.
17   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 18, 8:39am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
I just don't get the difficulty some people have. Just slow the fuck down and don't be an idiot.


Once you understand that most people are horribly stupid, this should answer a lot of life's mysteries.
18   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 18, 8:40am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

My vintage Ford Escort does just fine in snow like this. It's one of the main reasons I keep the car.
19   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jan 18, 8:45am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

This thread is useless without videos:

20   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 18, 8:58am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

lostand confused says
Patrick says
Coming from the upper Midwest, I learned to drive in snow. It's actually kinda fun to fishtail just a little bit to freak out the passengers.

Yeah one of my colleagues said when he was young, they used to spin on purpose in large empty parking lots for fun.

I had a friend that did that. Wrecked his car hitting one of the parking lot light poles. He just ran and said his car was stolen. Never got in trouble for that. This was in 1999ish, so this isn't some 70's story. I was surprised the police didn't look into it more at the time. It was a concrete base and the pole itself was fine. So no harm no foul I suppose.
21   BlueSardine   ignore (3)   2018 Jan 18, 9:00am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

What equipment would that be?

WookieMan says
They don't have the equipment to make it safe for drivers that have zero clue how to drive in those conditions.
22   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2018 Jan 18, 9:14am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

BlueSardine says
What equipment would that be?

WookieMan says
They don't have the equipment to make it safe for drivers that have zero clue how to drive in those conditions.

Mainly plows. Biloxi, MS likely doesn't have them. Why would they? Most plow trucks have large beds you fill with road salt and a distributor to apply it. These things aren't cheap and don't make sense to have in many areas. Without this equipment and the skill of drivers rarely if ever having driven on snow, I think you can understand what I'm getting at.

So knowing that, people that live in these areas should just stay off the roads. It's unfortunate, work is missed and money lost, but it is what it is. 10+ people dying in auto accidents when they knew the roads wouldn't be treated is pretty stupid. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/winter-storm-deep-freeze-wreak-havoc-south-article-1.3764046

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