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1   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 28, 9:32am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They can start by moving half their employees to a new location.
2   BayArea   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 28, 11:13am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They can either move out and decrease demand or they can help with increasing housing supply.

Outside of that, this is one big BS patty-cake show.
3   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 28, 11:24am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Building new headquarters with thousands of new employees is not helping. They need to move somewhere else. Agree on a location and create a new tech hub.
4   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 28, 11:26am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Any company hiring a new employee from outside the Bay Area should be forced to provide a new housing unit.
5   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (28)   2018 Mar 28, 11:31am   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Tow old buses into the parking lots and hire millions of H1 visa slaves and stuff them in the buses with a sleeping bag and a pillow.

Dig a ditch for them to shit in and you're good to go.

INNOVATION!
6   Patrick   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 28, 11:50am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Kind of interesting that the article never clearly mentions the core of the bill, namely that state law would override local regulation and force the granting of permission to develop high-rise housing near public transit.

I think that's a good idea overall. There are just too many towns in the Bay Area in particular which disallow high-rise housing, keeping the cost of housing much higher than it would otherwise be.
7   tovarichpeter   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 28, 2:49pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
Kind of interesting that the article never clearly mentions the core of the bill, namely that state law would override local regulation and force the granting of permission to develop high-rise housing near public transit.

I think that's a good idea overall. There are just too many towns in the Bay Area in particular which disallow


Exactly
8   tovarichpeter   ignore (2)   2018 Mar 28, 2:52pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Peter Thiel “Most Silicon Valley start-up money goes to urban slumlords”
By tovarichpeter follow tovarichpeter 2018 Mar 16, 4:02pm 266 views 11 comments watch sfw quote share

https://www.sfgate.com/expensive-san-francisco/article/peter-thiel-silicon-valley-capital-landlords-12759450.php
9   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (28)   2018 Mar 28, 3:46pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

tovarichpeter says
Peter Thiel “Most Silicon Valley start-up money goes to urban slumlords”


None of that will change.

Let the city's permit unlimited high rises next to the BART and they'll all be bought up by speculators who'll rent them out to the wage slaves via AirBnB or make bunking third parties a requirement of the lease.
10   Nobody   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 9:58am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

So the rich can get more slaves?
11   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 10:01am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They should pay MOAR money to their employees.
12   adarmiento   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 10:20am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Need to build high-rises and townhome (attached home) communities. Townhomes need at least 3 bedroom ,2 bath with a small backyard. That is one way to address the housing crisis. Built high-density housing.
13   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 10:26am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

New building in CA is still a drip, deliberately insufficient to prevent further rises of home prices.
And so housing becomes increasingly a luxury, a smaller and smaller fraction of the population can afford.
14   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 10:41am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Endless vistas of wage slave favelas, full of desperate boot licking lackies! What more could a CEO want?
15   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 11:04am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

We build full cities. Where is a good location to build a tech center where people will actually move to?

Would require 1000 acres or more. It would become an amazing destination that people and biz would jump for.

Where would you put a new tech hub city?
16   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 12:01pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

adarmiento says
Need to build high-rises and townhome (attached home) communities. Townhomes need at least 3 bedroom ,2 bath with a small backyard. That is one way to address the housing crisis. Built high-density housing.


Yes, because people DREAM of living in the concrete jungle.
17   WineHorror1   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 12:07pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
Kind of interesting that the article never clearly mentions the core of the bill, namely that state law would override local regulation and force the granting of permission to develop high-rise housing near public transit.

I think that's a good idea overall. There are just too many towns in the Bay Area in particular which disallow high-rise housing, keeping the cost of housing much higher than it would otherwise be.

They'll simply slow roll building in order to keep prices high high high. There are too many reasons housing must stay high.
18   Patrick   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 12:24pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

whitewater says
We build full cities. Where is a good location to build a tech center where people will actually move to?

Would require 1000 acres or more. It would become an amazing destination that people and biz would jump for.

Where would you put a new tech hub city?


@whitewater Anywhere on the coast between San Francisco and Portland. There are about 600 miles of stunningly beautiful coast and some big rivers flowing to the ocean. Could support a lot of people.

What's missing is a way to get there. The main highway is too far inland, there is no train service up the coast, and no significant port or airport.
19   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 1:31pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

No problem. We can build a high speed train, its one of the ways we connect cities. We could also upgrade an airport if a small one exits.

Whomever finds the land will get a free condo. no problem.
20   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 1:33pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

whitewater says
No problem. We can build a high speed train


Apparently we can't.
21   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 4:26pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

We have done the same for other areas. It is very possible if the demand is there or can be created. Our ability deliver includes high speed trains.

Local governments love us and will allow us to do what others have been refused to do. The relationships are essential as well as past performances.
22   SFace   ignore (0)   2018 Mar 30, 4:43pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
Kind of interesting that the article never clearly mentions the core of the bill, namely that state law would override local regulation and force the granting of permission to develop high-rise housing near public transit.

I think that's a good idea overall. There are just too many towns in the Bay Area in particular which disallow high-rise housing, keeping the cost of housing much higher than it would otherwise be.


Problem is to cut the city red tape, you get the state even worst red tape, 50% affordable housing, something like that. Sounds great in theory but deal breaker in practice.
23   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 7:00pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

whitewater says
We have done the same for other areas. It is very possible if the demand is there or can be created. Our ability deliver includes high speed trains.


Examples?
24   Strategist   ignore (1)   2018 Mar 30, 8:01pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Heraclitusstudent says
New building in CA is still a drip, deliberately insufficient to prevent further rises of home prices.
And so housing becomes increasingly a luxury, a smaller and smaller fraction of the population can afford.


Free markets has totally failed in this scenario. It fails when you don't allow free markets to be free.
25   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 1, 9:29am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

@satoshi

We completed over 7000 acres in Australia.

Australian government asked us to bring tourism to west coast of Australia. We have hotel approvals, airport upgrades, two golf courses (one destined to be world top 100), high rises, education, hospital complex, ... the 9 yards.

Our projects are regularly valued in the billions.

Whomever wants to help make this happen may contact me :

patricktechhub@gmail.com

The kinds of people I would love to hear from:

1. You want to help find the right land. 1000+ acres.
2. You want to find investors in real estate that want 50% returns at low risk. We work with institutional investors up to $100m but also offer as small as $50k.
3. You want to cheerlead and encourage us to do a new tech hub project and give us your input on what would make it an amazing destination to live and work in. Plus you are being part of the solution to silicon slum lords.


1 and 2 are paid commission and/or free housing. You will be delighted with compensation. 3 is rewarded with our thanks and an increased likelihood that what you want is what we would build for the community.
26   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (1)   2018 Apr 1, 11:17am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

whitewater says
@satoshi

We completed over 7000 acres in Australia.

Australian government asked us to bring tourism to west coast of Australia. We have hotel approvals, airport upgrades, two golf courses (one destined to be world top 100), high rises, education, hospital complex, ... the 9 yards


Nothing special. Where's the choo-choo in this picture?
27   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 1, 11:29am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

If you don’t like what we do, it’s your choice.

High speed trains are one element we do. As well as airport upgrades.

If you like what we do and want to profit from it, I am happy to receive your email.

with gratitude.
28   TwoScoopsPlissken   ignore (2)   2018 Apr 1, 12:33pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Perth is like Bakersfield, except it IS the Big City of the entire West Coast of Australia; there's no LA to go to - it IS the LA. In fact, compared to Perth, culturally Bakerfield is a mecca. Bands and Shows actually stop there.

If you're a young person, you'd find it Boring AF. If your thing is barbecue and hanging around at home, you might like it. If you own a boat, it's nice, but there's nowhere to go (Channel Islands for LA, Bahamas for Florida) for a trip. Kerguelen is many thousands of miles westward in the furious 50s, against the prevailing wind, and you wouldn't be allowed to land there as it's a nature preserve.

Aussies don't go to Perth because there's no reason to go, just like nobody says "C'mon kids, let's leave suburban Ohio or Massachussetts and spend thousands of dollars in flights and rooms to take a nice vacation in Fresno." Why should foreigners go? The 20 hour flight from Europe or the US is too short, so make another few hours connection in Sydney? To do what? Visit a few malls and meh local history museums that every medium sized city has?

Shopping, forget it. Since Perth is on the far side of the country that is on the far side of the world, anything besides cereal, leg of mutton, or bulk aluminium is very expensive, and stores close at 6PM by law.
29   whitewater   ignore (0)   2018 Apr 1, 12:52pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

You are right except we are creating the destination. The attraction. Qantas is rerouting because of us.




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