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The Big One could leave 250,000-400,000 quake refugees in California. Where will they go?

By Patrick following x   2018 Jun 3, 3:15pm 706 views   17 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-california-earthquake-refugee-arizona-20180603-story.html

When a catastrophic earthquake hits California, buildings will topple and potentially hundreds could be killed.

But what gets less attention is the wrenching aftermath of such a huge temblor, which could leave whole neighborhoods torched by fires uninhabitable and hundreds of thousands of people without a home.

Officials are grappling with where all these quake refugees would go.

In the San Francisco Bay Area, more than 400,000 could be displaced in a magnitude 7 earthquake on the Hayward fault, which directly runs underneath cities like Berkeley, Oakland, Hayward and Fremont, said Ken Hudnut, the U.S. Geological Survey’s science advisor for risk reduction. And it’s possible that more than 250,000 people in Southern California could be forced out of their homes after a major earthquake on the San Andreas fault, Hudnut said.


One guy I know is going to buy a nice mobile home and will simply be able to drive away from the disaster.
2   BradK   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 3:27pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Patrick says
One guy I know is going to buy a nice mobile home and will simply be able to drive away from the disaster.

Should be no problem getting out of the city...
3   Hircus   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 5:32pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I've though about this a few times - what the effects of various magnitude "big ones" would be upon CA society.

A normal big one, say a 7-8, would topple some buildings, and kill some people, but I don't think it would really have any significant effect on society. People would talk about it for a few months and then move on.

But, a bigger big one, say a 9 or a 10, would really kill lots of people, and destroy many homes, businesses, and infrastructure. Many people would leave the state, permanently. How many people would fear living in CA for the next few decades? People would vividly recall the natural disaster and conclude that it's not worth it to live in earthquake country, even though they know how rare these very large quakes are. The "California Premium" effect on real estate would be fractured and damaged, probably moving prices lower for a long time.
4   Hircus   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 5:34pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

btw - does anyone know how to identify geographic regions where an earthquake would have higher or lower effects?

Like, I imagine a hill behaves different than the nearby valley. And, some hills differently than others due to being rock or dirt or whatever...
6   Booger   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 3, 7:11pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

They will live in cardboard boxes until illegal aliens finish rebuilding their houses.
7   RC2006   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 8:20pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Hircus says
btw - does anyone know how to identify geographic regions where an earthquake would have higher or lower effects?

Like, I imagine a hill behaves different than the nearby valley. And, some hills differently than others due to being rock or dirt or whatever...


Tops of hills and mountains amplify shockwave. Hills are the worse because of soil movement.
8   just_passing_through   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 9:14pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

If it's granite you want to get up higher. I had a geologist pal who worked at the Redwood City port but had picked himself out a nice spot in the hills above Redwood City. Part of that area was solid granite and, "in a quake it's like being at the top of a ringing bell rather than the bottom."
9   just_passing_through   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 3, 9:16pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I think San Diego is relatively safe. I mean vs. LA or the SF area. The San Andreas runs out near the Salton Sea. But I really don't know - any locals on here who can school me?
10   lostand confused   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 4, 12:25am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Isn't that fault overdue for ever?
11   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch   ignore (32)   2018 Jun 4, 2:30am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Within hours most of those people will be gone in the ensuing massive FREE! fire fight when survivors realize there may not be any deliveries of Doritos for centuries.
12   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 5, 11:18am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Hircus says
does anyone know how to identify geographic regions where an earthquake would have higher or lower effects?


Higher in California, lower not in California.
13   socal2   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 5, 11:31am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

just_passing_through says
I think San Diego is relatively safe. I mean vs. LA or the SF area. The San Andreas runs out near the Salton Sea. But I really don't know - any locals on here who can school me?


San Diego is definitely safer than LA and the San Fran Bay area.

14   socal2   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 5, 11:33am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

The rest of the State.

15   RC2006   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 5, 2:27pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I think the closer towards the center of the major cities the more screwed you'll be once the hordes of savages figure out its a free for all.
16   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 5, 2:38pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

I’ve thought about this and planned like so.
1)emergency water
2)emergency food for one month, with extra propane for cooking.
3)guns and ammo to defend the home front.
4)relationships with neighbors for a watch/alliance.
5)solar cells for electricity and charging devices.
6)last ditch Armageddon plans include biking to the marina and stealing a sailboat.
17   RC2006   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 5, 3:53pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Quigley says
I’ve thought about this and planned like so.
1)emergency water
2)emergency food for one month, with extra propane for cooking.
3)guns and ammo to defend the home front.
4)relationships with neighbors for a watch/alliance.
5)solar cells for electricity and charging devices.
6)last ditch Armageddon plans include biking to the marina and stealing a sailboat.


Same here.

I put all my camping gear in the garage near the garage door. I have enough food in my backyard at all times to at least supplement food stored for a month or more depending on the season. The widow I help out next door has a pool so that on top of water I have stored I am good for months.
18   RobDawg   ignore (0)   2018 Jul 16, 10:59am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote        

Really really long time patrick.net readers will recall my comment that the 3 million in the San Fernando Valley all expect to drive to the Four Seasons in Thousand Oaks and stay the few weeks until insurance rebuilds their house.




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