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1   zzyzzx   ignore (2)   2019 Dec 16, 7:48am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/how-boeing-lost-its-bearings/602188/

Explains it all quite well. Engineers running the company got replaced my bean counters.

A Boeing vice president, Mike Sinnett, told American Airlines pilots that the MCAS software system implicated in the 737 Max crashes didn’t have “a single-point failure,” as reported—asserting that the pilots themselves constituted a second point of backup—showing both a misunderstanding of the term and a sharp break from Boeing’s long-standing practice of having multiple backups for every flight system. Meanwhile, experienced Boeing engineers rolled their eyes as some software-development tasks (not specific to MCAS) were outsourced to recent college grads earning as little as $9 an hour, who were employed by an Indian subcontractor set up across from Seattle’s Boeing Field.
2   Tenpoundbass   ignore (14)   2019 Dec 16, 7:57am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Thanks Shit Stain McCain!
4   NDrLoR   ignore (0)   2019 Dec 16, 8:24am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

zzyzzx says
Mike Sinnett
More like Mack Sennett
5   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 16, 8:25am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

zzyzzx says
Explains it all quite well. Engineers running the company got replaced my bean counters.

Expect more of that, and in all industries. As AF says,

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says
BUT SHAREHOLDER! VALUE!

Engineers/scientists often do not follow stupid orders by the omnistupid management, and thus they have to be removed form positions where they have any influence. Same has happened in pharma.
7   clambo   ignore (5)   2019 Dec 16, 8:46am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

The problem is worse; the reason they needed to write special software is the plane is inherently bad and easy to crash.

The plane was originally designed to hold a smaller diameter engine; they retrofit much larger yet more fuel efficient engines but had to mount them high on the wings.

The Airbus was "taller" and could accommodate the engine just fine.

Boeing needs to scrap the plane entirely but likely won't.
9   HEYYOU   ignore (47)   2019 Dec 20, 5:48pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

"Boeing Starliner Launches Into Wrong Orbit After Clock Problem"

"But somehow, the spacecraft’s clock was set to the wrong time, and a flawed thruster burn pushed the capsule into the wrong orbit."

Can't wind a clock?


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/20/science/boeing-starliner-launch.html
10   Blue   ignore (0)   2019 Dec 21, 6:34am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

clambo says
The plane was originally designed to hold a smaller diameter engine;

Can't they redesign smaller engines to fix the problem.
11   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 21, 7:44am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Blue says
Can't they redesign smaller engines to fix the problem.

BUT SHAREHOLDER VALUE AND MANAGEMENT BONUSES!
12   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostakovitch   ignore (52)   2019 Dec 21, 7:49am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

BUT SHAREHOLDER! VALUE!

DEAD ETHIOPIANS?

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
13   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 21, 7:52am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says
DEAD ETHIOPIANS?

exactly. I think there was also a planeload of dead Indonesians or something like that.

Any person with any conscience in Boeing would have resigned if he would be in any way connected to these plain crashes. Instead, "pilots were inexperienced, this was one in a trillion accident, those were not Americans so we should not care, we will just give them some glass beads"

FFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUU
14   NoCoupForYou   ignore (3)   2019 Dec 21, 7:54am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

"You're 50% overbudget and 3 years behind schedule. However, you have the correct procurement officials bribed, you've promised the Senior Admin/Procurement General a 7 figure consulting contract when they retire next year, and you've filled out the correct forms. We at NASA/USAF rate your performance 'Excellent' and award a bonus of $50M for this year."
16   Booger   ignore (5)   2019 Dec 21, 8:21pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Blue says
Can't they redesign smaller engines to fix the problem


The article implies that the larger engine was used because it got better MPG. Presumably the smaller one it was designed for could be used
17   Blue   ignore (0)   2019 Dec 22, 12:12am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Booger says
Blue says
Can't they redesign smaller engines to fix the problem


The article implies that the larger engine was used because it got better MPG. Presumably the smaller one it was designed for could be used


MPG should be secondary. Sounds like there was a compromise in safety requirements.
18   Booger   ignore (5)   2019 Dec 22, 4:34am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Blue says
MPG should be secondary.


It's all Obama's fault!!!
19   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 22, 8:02am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Booger says
It's all Obama's fault!!!

no, ORANGEMANBAD!!!
20   APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostakovitch   ignore (52)   2019 Dec 22, 11:30am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

MBAs have been at large for decades.

They need to be rounded up and gassed.
21   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 22, 3:27pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

APOCALYPSEFUCKisShostikovitch says
They need to be rounded up and gassed.

Target practice would be fine as well. I'd pay a cool 1000 to bag a few.
23   rd6B   ignore (1)   2019 Dec 23, 8:01am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Booger says
Boeing CEO ousted!

Did he get to keep his bonuses from jacking up stock prices via stock repurchases, and did he get a golden parachute?
Note that articles do not mention any of that. It is very likely that he sails off into retirement sunset with a cool half billion + Boeing pension. Yay, WINNING! after 300 dead Ethiopians and 300 dead Indonesians and Boeing reputation destroyed. But the Masters of Universe should not suffer for their idiocy, it is workers who will be laid off with 2 weeks salary.
24   RC2006   ignore (2)   2019 Dec 23, 8:16am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

CEOs need to lose everything if they are outed and any stocks they recieve as compensation should be held until at least five years after retirement so they leave company on good footing.
25   rd6B   ignore (1)   2020 Jan 10, 3:46pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

As expected, Mr Dickface gets a golden parachute (instead of $0.00), which is for some reason not called a golden parachute :

Based on the closing stock price on January 9, 2020, and assuming performance at target for the PBRSUs and performance awards, the forfeited awards would have been valued at approximately $14.6 million, while the vested long-term incentive awards would be valued at approximately $29.4 million. Additional terms of the long-term incentive awards are disclosed in the 2019 Proxy Statement. Mr. Muilenburg also vested in certain stock unit awards earned prior to his service as President and Chief Executive Officer that, based on the closing stock price on January 9, 2020, are valued at approximately $4.3 million. In addition, Mr. Muilenburg will receive distributions of pension and nonqualified deferred compensation benefits earned during his tenure with the Company that, including contributions made by Mr. Muilenburg, were valued at approximately $28.5 million as of December 31, 2019. As disclosed in the 2019 Proxy Statement, Mr. Muilenburg also holds options to purchase 72,969 shares of Company common stock. These options have an exercise price of $75.97 and vested in full in 2013, prior to his service as President and Chief Executive Officer.

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/boeings-muilenburg-get-no-bonus-or-severance

FFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU
26   rd6B   ignore (1)   2020 Jan 10, 3:49pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

And there is more:

Compensation of Former Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, Boeing Commercial Airplanes
Kevin G. McAllister ceased to serve as Executive Vice President, President and Chief Executive Officer of Boeing Commercial Airplanes on October 22, 2019. In connection with Mr. McAllister’s termination of employment, he forfeited 100,000 unvested RSUs that were awarded in connection with his hire in 2016, as well as 20,072 unvested RSUs he had received pursuant to the Company’s long-term incentive program. In addition, Mr. McAllister forfeited 10,183 unvested PBRSUs and 61,764 unvested performance awards. The total value of Mr. McAllister’s forfeited equity awards and earned dividend equivalents as of October 22, 2019, the day of the termination of his employment, was approximately $52.9 million.
In connection with Mr. McAllister’s separation, he received a lump sum cash payment of $14.75 million from the Company. This amount was designed to approximate the value of a pension benefit that Mr. McAllister forfeited when he left a former employer. Mr. McAllister received no other compensation from the Company in connection with his separation.

A 15M payment for being incompetent.

https://www.sec.gov/ix?doc=/Archives/edgar/data/12927/000001292720000003/a202001jan108k.htm
27   Booger   ignore (5)   2020 Jan 21, 7:15pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

737-MAX now delayed until June or July.

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