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San Francisco's slide into hell under extreme liberalism

By Patrick follow Patrick   2021 Apr 15, 9:51pm 1,083 views   68 comments   watch   nsfw   quote   share    


https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2021/04/19/chesa-boudins-dangerous-san-francisco/

‘Hey, where are you?” Hannah Ege texted her husband, Sheria Musyoka. He’d left on a morning jog and had been gone for an hour and a half. Hannah was home, taking care of their three-year-old son. She began to freak out. She called and texted and called again. He never answered.

Speeding and drunk — at just shy of eight in the morning — Jerry Lyons barreled through a red light at an intersection in a stolen Ford Explorer. Lyons struck and killed Musyoka, a 26-year-old Dartmouth grad who had moved to San Francisco only ten days earlier with his wife and their son. After clipping Musyoka, Lyons collided with another car, causing an eight-car pileup that sent several other people to the hospital.

The San Francisco police arrested Lyons on multiple charges that morning in February, but this was not the first time he’d been arrested for drunk driving in a stolen car. On December 3, he had been arrested for driving under the influence, driving a stolen vehicle, and driving without a license. Before that, he’d been released from prison after serving time for a grand-theft conviction; in fact, Lyons had been arrested at least seven times in the Bay Area since his release from prison, and his rap sheet goes back a decade. Still, San Francisco’s district attorney, Chesa Boudin, delayed pressing charges against Lyons until a toxicology report confirmed that he had been inebriated, which, more than a month and a half later in January, it did. Lyons then had 14 days to turn himself in to the DA’s office. On the 13th day, he killed Musyoka. While COVID-era difficulties might have accounted for the medical examiner’s slow speed in returning test results, a different DA could have chosen to move forward sooner — taking necessary precautions — and charged Lyons with a DUI based on observable factors alone, such as the results of Lyons’s field sobriety test, his erratic driving in a stolen vehicle, and close scrutiny of his behavior.

Hannah Ege expressed her grief and pain to a local TV news station, railing at the district attorney’s reluctance to lock up repeat offenders. Whom does she blame for her husband’s death? “The DA,” she said. “This freak accident was no freak accident. It was someone who was out in the public who should not have been out in public.”

The Lyons mayhem is not an isolated case in the city by the bay. On New Year’s Eve, a parolee on the run from a robbery — also in a stolen car — sped through a red light, striking and killing two women, 60-year-old Elizabeth Platt and 27-year-old Hanako Abe, who were in the crosswalk. The driver, Troy McAlister, had been released twice by the district attorney in the previous year: the first time because Boudin refuses to pursue three-strike cases, of which McAlister’s was one; the second — as recently as December 20, when the SFPD arrested McAlister for driving a stolen car — because Boudin kicked the case to the state parole officers, who did nothing.

Welcome to San Francisco’s latest idiocy, a new experiment in governance where everything is allowed but nothing is permitted. A paradox, you might say, but take a walk down Market Street, down that great avenue in a great city in a great nation, and note the desolation of the empty streets, the used needles tossed on the sidewalks, and the boarded-up windows on storefronts. Consider that, at various unpredictable times in the last year, it has been illegal — for the sake of public safety during COVID — to run a mom-and-pop corner shop or to serve food at sidewalk cafés. Reflect for a moment that, since time immemorial, it has been illegal to build any new housing, because of the most onerous and confusing zoning laws in the known universe. Mark Zuckerberg can apparently influence national elections by tweaking algorithms, but he is powerless before the planning commission when it comes to building apartments for his employees. The city has banned plastic straws, plastic bags, and McDonald’s Happy Meals with toys. And yet, all the while, drug dealers sell their wares — COVID or no COVID — openly and freely at all hours of the day and night, users shoot up or pop fentanyl in public and defecate on the street, robbers pillage cars and homes with the ease of Visigoth raiders, and the district attorney frees repeat offenders who go on to sow disorder, pain, devastation, and grief. A profound melancholy hangs in the air of this city, punctuated only by the shrieks of a junkie dreaming of demons or by the rat-tat-tat-bam of the occasional firework. (Or was that a gun?) ...

How did it come to this? On January 8, 2020, Mayor London Breed swore in Chesa Boudin as the new district attorney of San Francisco in front of a packed house at the Herbst Theater. Boudin won the election by a nose in a runoff, with oily promises to feel the pain of all parties to a crime, both victims and perpetrators. He made pledges to enact “restorative justice” and prison reform through “decarceration.” U.S. Supreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor recorded a congratulatory video message, which was played at the swearing-in ceremony for Boudin and the crowd. “Chesa, you have undertaken a remarkable challenge today,” the justice said. “The hope you reflect is a great beacon to many.”

The task before Boudin was already monumental. Before he assumed his office, San Francisco ranked No. 1 in the nation in property crime. On average, thieves broke 60 car windows per day, with impunity. In 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, a reform measure that reduced many felonies to ticketed misdemeanors, such as theft of less than $950 and hard-drug possession. There were more drug addicts on the streets than there were students in the schools. Tent encampments of homeless people had sprouted in every nook and alley and under every highway overpass. Commuters faced a daily gauntlet in the form of an appalling humanitarian crisis in the streets.

But Boudin immediately refused to take any responsibility for these issues. Among his first acts was to fire seven veteran prosecutors who were not on board with his radical views. (Over 30 prosecutors have left during his tenure because they don’t want to work for him.) Next, Boudin abolished the cash-bail system, so offenders are able to walk free after arrest. He rarely brings a case to trial: Out of the 6,333 cases to land on his desk since taking office, he has gone to trial only 23 times. This is one-tenth the rate of his predecessor, George Gascón, who was hardly tough on crime. Since the killing of George Floyd, there has been a shortage of cops, as officers retire in record numbers. San Francisco has also moved to defund the police, with plans to shift $120 million in law-enforcement funding to restorative-justice programs, housing support, and a guaranteed-income pilot, among other ideas.

To where does Boudin’s “great beacon” point? Over the last year, there have been more deaths from drug overdoses in San Francisco than from COVID-19. Walgreens has closed ten of its drugstores in the city because its shelves were being pillaged freely by shoplifters. According to SFPD’s CompStat, compared with last year, arson has increased 52 percent, motor-vehicle theft is up 21 percent, and burglaries have seen a 59 percent increase. One largely Asian neighborhood, the Richmond district, has reported a 342 percent spike in burglaries this year compared with last. Admittedly, some numbers are down, such as those for larceny and robbery. But police attribute these declines to the pandemic, since there are fewer opportunities for would-be criminals to commit such crimes as people shelter in place. One neighborhood association sent a letter in February to Boudin and Mayor Breed, begging them to restore public safety. The association also posted it on the Internet. “Our neighborhood can’t wait another day,” they wrote. “Our homes are repeatedly broken into and robbed. Our merchants suffer unsustainable losses from theft and smashed windows. Employees are threatened with guns. Residents are robbed at gunpoint on our own streets. The sound of gunshots is no longer unusual.” ...

Now, what rough beast slouches its way towards San Francisco? With a district attorney who won’t prosecute crimes, how long will it be until an anxious Google engineer defends himself from being harassed by a madman? Will envious arsonists light the Salesforce Tower on fire as a jacked-up mob courses through the streets burning and looting the Painted Ladies?

A desperate sun struggles through the fog. There may be one ray of hope. The city has recently approved the effort to recall Chesa Boudin from office. Locals could begin downloading signature-gathering petitions on March 12. If 10 percent of registered voters sign the petition, all voters may get the chance to vote the bum out. But even if they do, it will remain tragic for Musyoka, Platt, Abe, and others like them that the day did not come soon enough.

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29   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 17, 2:36pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
Problem is it's still almost exclusively domestic visitors that go to CA


Ha! Obviously you haven't been around to tourist spots here.

The Americans you cite also come to the main tourist places too. It's not unusual for them to be outnumbered by foreigners.

The main attractions in Northern California it has not been unusual for American tourists to be outnumbered by foreigner tourists. I have a bit of insight on it from conversing with some of those we encountered. I like to ask them where they've been, where they plan to go, if they're enjoying their visit, what they liked, what they would recommend, thanking them for coming here. Plus we have friends, relatives, colleagues from abroad (Europe, Australia, Asia) who've made their own such treks and shared their stories with us. Some included visiting with us in their Grand Tour.

There's a bit of a circuit that includes the more or less mandatory LA area, the Coast Road from there to the Bay Area, and Yosemite. It's not unusual for foreigners to outnumber Americans at tourist spots in those places, especially during the "season". Especially, somewhat bizzarely, Death Valley in August with Germans. Some folks may dogleg to other glamorous spots they're interested in like Tahoe, Vegas, Sequioa NP, Wine Country. For these foreigners, those whom I encountered when we were also in-state tourists, and also our friends, it's a Once-In-A-Lifetime "grand tour" of California, much like Americans may make in Europe.

There's lots of fabulous places for locals to visit that are not on the Foreigner Grand Circuit. The relatively few foreigner tourists we may encounter in these places tend to fall into either of these two categories: H1-visa Tech Yuppies making a weekend trip with their overseas-visiting parents, and young backpacker types from Europe or Australia who are touring the Western US till their money runs out. Occasionally some Korean or Japanese kids doing that too. These such fabulous places include Lassen, Humboldt Redwoods, white water rafting in Sierra foothills, skiing/snowboarding, Pinnacles, etc. Mostly all in-state California American tourists, H1's with their visiting parents, and a handful of foreign backpacker types. You'll encounter few non-Californian Americans.
30   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 17, 4:48pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

B.A.C.A.H. says
Especially, somewhat bizzarely, Death Valley in August with Germans.


Did that in August. Must be the partial German blood! What's wrong with death valley in August? Nothing like booking a motel room right in stovepipe wells, jumping into the pools at night then drying within minutes on the rocks with your bare skin. Or a nightly full moon walk to zabriskie point. Must have done!
31   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 17, 7:02pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

mell says
Did that in August. Must be the partial German blood!


ha! Death Valley in August. Who'd have thought?

We did it (and yes, a grandparent of mine immigrated from Germany). Had dinner in the saloon/steakhouse in Furnace Creek on a crowded Saturday night. My family appeared to be the only non-German diners in the place. I asked the waitress if it was unusual. She told me that "it's August", like I should know already, that's German tourist time. Yes, she told me, we were there on a typical August night. I still remember, it was 126 F in the shade when we arrived in the afternoon.

A few days later while in Vegas I read in the Vegas Newspaper that a group of three Germans had gone missing in Death Valley that weekend. Their rental car was found at a trailhead. The last they'd been seen was at the accommodation in the early morning. The authorities said it was likely they died of exposure on the trail. Sure enough a day or so later it was reported their bodies were found, died from exposure.

I've told this recollection to folks over the years. Some others have told me they've also been to Death Valley in August. Like me they observed the Germans were the biggest group. Two different German friends of mine included an August stopover in Death Valley on their Grand Tours of California.
32   MMR   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 17, 10:05pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
Mayor London Breed swore in Chesa Boudin as the new district attorney of San Francisco in front of a packed house at the Herbst Theater. Boudin won the election by a nose in a runoff, with oily promises to feel the pain of all parties to a crime, both victims and perpetrators. He made pledges to enact “restorative justice” and prison reform through “decarceration.” U.S. Supreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor recorded a congratulatory video message, which was played at the swearing-in ceremony for Boudin and the crowd. “Chesa, you have undertaken a remarkable challenge today,” the justice said. “The hope you reflect is a great beacon to many.”



Skeletor said it best:

https://youtu.be/JBGKZv7cB8o
33   Ceffer   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 17, 10:46pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Chesa Boudin is just another Soros fecal impaction, likely a beneficiary of election fraud. Now, we have to remove all these fecal impactions by petition.
34   WookieMan   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 18, 7:46am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

B.A.C.A.H. says
The Americans you cite also come to the main tourist places too. It's not unusual for them to be outnumbered by foreigners.

I guess I don't mean tourist necessarily. But people from out of state on non-work visits. Maybe visiting family and not doing any tourist stuff or CA expats. The west coast and east coast are obviously the easiest to get to for foreigners, so yes, the percentage will be higher.

But given what there is to do in CA having been multiple times and what you list, there should be waaaaay more domestic tourist than foreign. You're kind of arguing my point really that Americans don't like CA. It's a 5 hour or less flight for 100% of mainland Americans. Hell, even Alaska and Hawaii. Americans should outnumber foreigners given the proximity and what you can do there.

Again, this isn't a bash on the beauty of the state and great weather. This is a judgement on politics that come out of your state and how the rest of the country perceives CA. It's not you or any user on this site, it's your government. You guys are just used to it, but let's say I buy a camping chair. The tag on the damn thing says CA thinks this chair could cause cancer. It's like WTF? A chair. Every product the rest of the country buys says you're going to die from it basically because CA says so. It's fucked up.

And again, 2 of our top 3 leaders are from CA and want to implement shit policy. Look at the border. It took all of 2 weeks for it to turn into a shit storm and Harris, the one supposedly heading the issue went MIA and is from CA. Flyover country doesn't want that shit. As an outsider it makes us less prone to go to your once great state. I can stay at the Ritz on St. Thomas for 1/2 the cost of say a nice place in Big Sur and the flight is an hour shorter. Though I'd love to go there. San Diego is probably the only big city I'd physically stay in again and that was still filled with bums as well. I can't even imagine LA or SF since I last went into those cities.

I know most users here are from CA. This isn't a judgement on you. I think it's clear you guys don't like the state level politics either. As an outsider, I'm just explaining what a lot of people think of CA and that it's not a destination for Americans anymore like it used to be.
35   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 8:32am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
B.A.C.A.H. says
The Americans you cite also come to the main tourist places too. It's not unusual for them to be outnumbered by foreigners.

I guess I don't mean tourist necessarily. But people from out of state on non-work visits. Maybe visiting family and not doing any tourist stuff or CA expats. The west coast and east coast are obviously the easiest to get to for foreigners, so yes, the percentage will be higher.

But given what there is to do in CA having been multiple times and what you list, there should be waaaaay more domestic tourist than foreign. You're kind of arguing my point really that Americans don't like CA. It's a 5 hour or less flight for 100% of mainland Americans. Hell, even Alaska and Hawaii. Americans should outnumber foreigners given the proximity and what you can do there.

Again, this isn't a bash on the beauty of the state and great weather. This is a ...


One has to understand that it was the same open mindedness to technology and progress, people, foreigners, entrepreneurs, that created massive wealth and prosperity for CA and started the long tech lead and reign of SV. It eventually, like always, was coopted by bad actors and ideologies when these initially good ideas were taken to absurd extremes. Eventually there will be a reset. Just leave or find a beautiful enclave, still plenty of those as CA is big.
36   Ceffer   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 8:34am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Barbed wire futures are big in California, but it hasn't reached the stage of land mines yet (except for Vietnam Vet pot farms).
37   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 18, 3:05pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
I know most users here are from CA


It's fun to put in the last word, isn't it?

Enjoy!
38   Booger   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 3:32pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Fuck San Francisco.
39   WookieMan   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 18, 5:54pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

B.A.C.A.H. says
WookieMan says
I know most users here are from CA


It's fun to put in the last word, isn't it?

Enjoy!

Not sure your point. Collectively I don't think users here want to trash CA. The problem is, is that it is trash now. This really is undeniable. You can be a homer, but there's no denying CA is going to shit. Users from CA on this site say the same thing.
40   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 18, 5:56pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
there's no denying CA is going to shit


Last word. Youdda Man!
41   WookieMan   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 18, 6:01pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

B.A.C.A.H. says
WookieMan says
there's no denying CA is going to shit


Last word. Youdda Man!

What you talking about? It's okay to admit the place you live is shit. IL has some of the absolute worst people running government. CA is no different and likely worse. You can enjoy the scenery and cost of living for weather, that doesn't mean anything though. No last word here, just reality and honesty.
43   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 6:06pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Not all CA is going to shit, it's just very expensive to live here now. There are still plenty of enclaves, rural and semi-rural areas, small towns and villages that are beautiful to live in and those may preserve until the reset brings relief to the shitholes. Wine Country, Tahoe, Bodega Bay, Mendocino County, Carmel, Monterey etc. All still beautiful.
44   WookieMan   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 18, 6:11pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

mell says
All still beautiful.

Not denying that. I'm arguing the people aren't. Not you or anyone on this site. Your state is run by crazy people and 2 of the top 3 are running the country. That's problematic for us non-CA people. This isn't really debatable. People like CA, but it is universally hated politically.
45   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 6:20pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
mell says
All still beautiful.

Not denying that. I'm arguing the people aren't. Not you or anyone on this site. Your state is run by crazy people and 2 of the top 3 are running the country. That's problematic for us non-CA people. This isn't really debatable. People like CA, but it is universally hated politically.


So are Whitmer, Cuomo, Pritzker and many more blue despots, also on the mayoral level. At least they're trying to recall Newsom and boudin in SF. Leftoidism has taken over the country, but 2022 and 2024 may bring a reset if they can achieve fair elections.
46   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 18, 7:35pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
It's okay to admit the place you live is shit.

Because it's so important to have the last word, - huh?
47   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 18, 7:38pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

WookieMan says
People like CA, but it is universally hated politically.

Yep. Last word spoken on the topic. Get it in.

This Is How We Do It, as Montell Jordan sang.
48   Ceffer   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 18, 8:20pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

With election fraud siring several generations of politicians, I do wonder if California isn't quite as crazy as it seems. California voted for Trump by 60 percent, which the 'real' tallies show without the election fraud. That one even surprised me and made me wonder. I am not quite as skeptical of my fellow Californians now, thinking they are not all out to lunch.

I suppose the question is if elections will ever be honest again here. They now think California was the testing grounds for election fraud before they thought it was ready for prime time nationally. That certainly accounts for the eerie feeling my wife and I get at our suburban polling stations. The poll workers stare and have the fakest smiles and gestures. I am sure some of them are appointed to oversee the fraud.

Wherever they warehouse those Dominion and computerized voting machines, they need to be blown up. Hand counted ballots only. If they don't get rid of the Soros voting machines, we are going to be fucked with even more ridiculous and destructive politicians moving forward.
49   WineHorror1   ignore (2)   2021 Apr 18, 9:08pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Onvacation says
A big Independence Party!

I don't celebrate the 4th anymore, too much cog dis.
50   just_passing_through   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 18, 9:42pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Ceffer says
I am not quite as skeptical of my fellow Californians now


I learned in a zoom meeting last week that 94-95% of my co-workers, most in the bay area, like myself skipped the weekly diversity/critical race theory trainings that have bee going on the past couple of months. I can't remember if there were 18 or 20 people in that meeting.
51   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Apr 18, 10:26pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

The meeting were optional?

Sounds like a better company than most in the Bay Area.
52   farmer2021   ignore (10)   2021 Apr 18, 10:40pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
The meeting were optional?

Sounds like a better company than most in the Bay Area.


I had tons of customers who I needed to get access to help them with technical matters.
The training overload and to maintain credentials was nightmare.

Somebody needs to create a company for these stupid trainings and issue certificate to show everywhere.
Or they can have one training which says:
"You can work here if you have common sense and sense of morality".
53   just_passing_through   ignore (7)   2021 Apr 19, 8:44am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Yeah, it wasn't advertised as optional at first. Then they did sneaky stuff and changed the name and removed the topics of each meeting. Did you have to go to one?
54   NDrLoR   ignore (1)   2021 Apr 19, 9:04am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

just_passing_through says
I can't remember if there were 18 or 20 people in that meeting.
19?
55   Ceffer   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 19, 10:31am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Who wouldn't want to be screamed at by fat, psychotic black women bellowing for more free shit than they already got under threat of violence? Cuckoo birds attack!
56   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 19, 10:44am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Ceffer says
Chesa Boudin is just another Soros fecal impaction, likely a beneficiary of election fraud. Now, we have to remove all these fecal impactions by petition.


Boudin is the literal spawn of Weatherman Terrorists.

What we're living in is a Corporate - Weatherman - CCP Alliance.
58   Robert Sproul   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 24, 7:06pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

mell says
Wine Country, Tahoe, Bodega Bay, Mendocino County, Carmel, Monterey etc. All still beautiful.

Beautiful yes, but you are sharing the scenery with 4 million annual tourists to Napa Valley, 8 million to Monterey, and 25 million (!) to the Tahoe Basin. Bus loads of weird foreign tourists, clogging the roads and restaurants. My friends in Point Reyes Station (2.5 million a year) basically don't leave their house on summer week-ends.
To many people ruin anything.
59   Robert Sproul   ignore (0)   2021 Apr 24, 7:21pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I grieve for the San Francisco of my youth. When I got my drivers license in 1969 I drove to SF almost immediately . When I first drove across the Bay Bridge coming into The City from the hot dusty Central Valley, it was MAGIC. Hippies of course, but also there were still longshoremen on the docks and sailors from around the world walking the streets. Tourists yes, but they came for the opening of Dungeness crab season not the Folsom Street Freak Show. There was authentic experience to be had instead of crude tourist simulations. The Limousine Liberals (Walter Shorenstein et al) had not completed their “urban renewal”, tearing down thousands of SRO hotel rooms, so the bums didn’t have to sleep on the street. A few years later working as labor on construction jobs I could easily afford an apartment in the Mission. The ruination of San Francisco is so complete and tragic, I can’t stand to visit anymore.
60   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Apr 24, 7:45pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Robert Sproul says
mell says
Wine Country, Tahoe, Bodega Bay, Mendocino County, Carmel, Monterey etc. All still beautiful.

Beautiful yes, but you are sharing the scenery with 4 million annual tourists to Napa Valley, 8 million to Monterey, and 25 million (!) to the Tahoe Basin. Bus loads of weird foreign tourists, clogging the roads and restaurants. My friends in Point Reyes Station (2.5 million a year) basically don't leave their house on summer week-ends.
To many people ruin anything.


True but Sonoma is not as crowded as Napa and that's why you get a place in a private community close to trails so you can do the weeknights at the Plaza with the locals and weekends you stay near your pools, trails or tennis courts and invite people over. It's still far less crowded than the bay area, but of course you'll do weekday lunch dates with your wife or gf at your favorite wineries/restaurants. Compared to SF the car and tourist traffic is nothing. Ironically SF has been pretty empty from the lack of tourism and office closings plus people moving, yet the asshole central planners do everything to annoy the shit out of any residents who still occasionally have to drive from point A to B, and amazingly they managed via a combo of utter nonsensical covid street closures plus terrible programming of lights to clog up the streets at at least 10-20 important chokepoints again. When people return this will only get worse. Driving or riding in wine country is a breeze compared to the bay area.
62   B.A.C.A.H.   ignore (0)   2021 May 2, 1:07pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

from http://housingbubble.blog/?p=4704 which cited it from other (news) sources.....

From Bloomberg on California. “For the first time in more than 25 years, San Francisco is forecasting that its property tax base will fall – a decline that reflects the tough straits of the city that is among the hardest hit by the pandemic downturn. That tax base, the real estate values the city uses to calculate taxes, rarely drops even in the worst of times, thanks to a quirk in California law dating back to 1978. Not even the dot-com bust or the 2008 financial crisis was capable of nudging it lower.”

“‘San Francisco’s almost got a state of emergency in its economics,’ said Ken Rosen, professor emeritus at the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley who focuses on real estate. With an expected fall in commercial property values, ‘there’s no question that’s going to make the city have very tight budgets the next few years.'”

“‘Historically, offices have been a huge generator of revenue in San Francisco,’ said Megan Elliott, who manages a team of residential and commercial property appraisers for the city. Pointing to Salesforce’s high-profile cancellation of a lease, Ms Elliott said: ‘if that kind of thing continues to happen, it’s going to leave us all wondering what do we do with that space now and what kind of value does it have?'”
63   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 May 3, 2:04am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Good, they deserve to be bankrupt until the statue of Columbus goes back in his rightful place on Telegraph Hill.
64   Rin   ignore (8)   2021 May 3, 2:23am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

https://patrick.net/post/1338939?offset=0#comment-1748657

For years, on this forum, I've been saying that SF was Philly by the Bay.

This is in stark contrast with Boston, which was originally dubbed SF's sister east coast city. Nothing could be further from the truth.


Ceffer says
Strange. I never heard SF compared to Boston.



I have ... my whole youth until I visited and said, wait a minute?! I'm in Philly! Why fly six hours for a six hour drive down i-95?!
65   Eric Holder   ignore (0)   2021 May 3, 9:51am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Rin says
For years, on this forum, I've been saying that SF was Philly by the Bay.


Let's see:

SF:



Philly:



Sorry, not even close.
66   mostly reader   ignore (0)   2021 May 3, 11:23am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Rin says
For years, on this forum, I've been saying that SF was Philly by the Bay.

This is in stark contrast with Boston, which was originally dubbed SF's sister east coast city. Nothing could be further from the truth.
It seems to me that SF aspired to be Boston but couldn't pull it, so it went the "blue hair" route to compensate.
67   Rin   ignore (8)   2021 May 3, 11:53am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

mostly reader says
To me, Boston looks like what SF aspires to be but never can, so it goes the "blue hair" route to compensate.


Here's the thing ... when I was a kid, Boston wasn't all that great, not in terms of the 'Greater Boston/Eastern MA' area (which was always solid), but the city scape itself.

Sections like Charlestown & South Boston were known for 'white trash' Irish gangs, where outsiders were routinely harassed and driven out of certain locales.

Maverick Sq, in East Boston (circa the airport) had bums everywhere and wasn't safe. Today's it's a gorgeous up and coming neighborhood with residences, restaurants, etc.

The quaint neighborhood next to Dorchester, Savin Hill, had a moniker ... "Stabbing (or Savage) Hill". Well, that's completely changed within my short lifespan & there hasn't been a stabbing there in ages.

While the core 'hoods of Roxbury, Mattapan, & Dorchester still have their urban blight issues, all the other areas have dramatically improved and make SF look like a Philly-on-high in contrast.

So, when I was a kid, SF was suppose to be Boston's future version, a cosmopolitan city with university influences like UC/Berkeley & SF, Stanford, nature-loving ppl, technology, etc.

Instead, SF waned while Boston improved and basically, restricted its urban dystopia down to 3 neighborhoods in the middle. And judging by some of the ppl I'd known who'd risked moving there, even those places aren't as bad, as a few decades ago, where I wouldn't go there w/o a military attache.
68   Rin   ignore (8)   2021 May 3, 11:59am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

In addition, Boston's built an entire 2nd financial/business district (equal in size to the original) in an area which was full of abandoned warehouses called the 'Seaport' district.

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