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Why memes are so effective


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2022 Jul 22, 6:32pm   42,667 views  404 comments

by Patrick   ➕follow (60)   💰tip   ignore  

https://boriquagato.substack.com/p/the-revenge-of-the-shape-rotators

https://boriquagato.substack.com/p/the-revenge-of-the-shape-rotators-735

https://boriquagato.substack.com/p/the-revenge-of-the-shape-rotators-a5e


lying with taut talking points or evocative images is easy. hell, that’s what they’re for.

but memes that lie mostly do not work.

they are not funny or evocative because the analogy fails. it’s code that won’t compile. only that which draws valid comparison sets off the associational informational cascade that leads to the vast enhancements in informational density that make this modality special.

and without that your meme loses its potency.

you can only tell people so much in a brief span.

that’s why they call it an “attention economy.”

the true meme gets you to run code you already have installed.

that’s why it is so powerful and why its effect cumulate.

we are just starting to see the capability of this jump in communication evolution.

it will shake worlds.

and this is a glorious thing.

it skewers everything.

no one is safe.

(not even if they were promised that there would be a monkey to help them)

the speed with which this can pour a spicy glass of “shut the hell up” and provoke real thought by eliciting and evoking analogy is unprecedented as is the sublime, anarchic free market to select and spread the best means of doing so.

once, the powers that be needed fear only a few cartoonists and voices and could easily suppress their spread. now you must fight against the full force of the insight and creativity of the global myriads and the relentless upvote of the informational instantiations which best work to convey meaning as infallibly adjudicated by an audience of billions that play off one another like jazz night at birdland.


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394   Ceffer   2024 Jun 25, 1:31am  

"Viruses of the Mind
The New World (Order) fell not to a sword but to a meme.
– Daniel Quinn
By Alnoor Ladha, Martin Kirk Published in Spring | Summer 2016 Comments 60

"What if we told you that humanity is being driven to the brink of extinction by an illness? That all the poverty, the climate devastation, the perpetual war, and consumption fetishism we see all around us
have roots in a mass psychological infection? What if we went on to say that this infection is not just highly communicable but also self-replicating, according to the laws of cultural evolution, and that it
remains so clandestine in our psyches that most hosts will, as a condition of their infected state, vehemently deny that they are infected? What if we then told you that this ‘mind virus’ can be described
as a form of cannibalism. Yes, cannibalism. Not necessarily in the literal flesh-eating sense but rather the idea of consuming others – human and non-human – as a means of securing personal wealth and supremacy.
You may dismiss this line of thinking as New Age woo-woo or, worse, a leftist conspiracy theory. But this approach of viewing the transmission of ideas as a key determinant of the emergent reality is increasingly validated by various branches of science, including evolutionary theory, quantum physics, cognitive linguistics, and epigenetics.
The history of this infection is long, strange, and dark. But it leads to hope.

One of the most well-accepted scientific theories that helps explain the power of idea-spreading is memetics.
Memes are to culture what genes are to biology: the base unit of evolution. The term was originally coined by the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in his 1976 book, The Selfish Gene. Dawkins
writes, “I think that a new kind of replicator has recently emerged . . . It is still drifting clumsily about in its primeval soup, but already it is achieving evolutionary change at a rate which leaves the old gene
panting far behind.” He goes on, “Examples of memes are tunes, ideas, catch-phrases, clothes fashions, ways of making pots or of
building arches. Just as genes propagate themselves in the gene pool by leaping from body to body via sperms or eggs, so memes propagate themselves in the meme pool by leaping from brain to brain, via a process which, in the broad sense, can be called imitation.”
One of the high priests of rationalism, the scientific method, and atheism, is also the father of the meme of ‘memes.’ However, like all memes or ideas, there can be no ownership in a traditional sense,
only the entanglement that quantum physics reminds us characterizes our intra-actions.
Of course, similar notions of how ideas move between us have been around in Western traditions for centuries. Plato was the first to f
ully articulate this through his Theory of Forms, which argues that
non-physical forms – i.e. ideas – represent the perfect reality from which material reality is derived.
Modern articulations of the Theory of Forms can be seen in Pierre Teilhard de Chardin’s idea of the Noosphere (the sphere of human thought) and Carl Jung’s Collective Unconscious, where structures of
the unconscious are shared among beings of the same species. For Jung, the idea of the marauding cannibal would first be an archetype that manifests in the material world through the actions of those
who channel or embody it.
For those who prefer their science more empirical, the growing field of epigenetics provides some intellectual concrete. Epigenetics studies changes in organisms caused by modification of gene
expression rather than any physical alteration of the gene itself. In other words, how traits vary from generation to generation is not solely a question of material biology but is partly determined by environmental and contextual factors that affected our ancestors and then are triggered within our genetic sequence through activation events in our life"

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