2
0

Medical and law school curriculums online


 invite response                
2024 Feb 9, 9:19pm   113 views  4 comments

by Patrick   ➕follow (52)   💰tip   ignore  

I've been looking for medical and law school curriculums online and haven't found any right away. It's almost like they're being hidden.

Can anyone find them in detail, like several pages worth?

What about the textbooks, are any of those online?

Comments 1 - 4 of 4        Search these comments

1   Ceffer   2024 Feb 9, 10:49pm  

Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics is what the interns carry around (probably on their cell phones).
https://pdfdrive.to/filedownload/washington-manual-of-medical-therapeutics-36th-edition
Manual of Surgical Pathology, another practical consultation manual
https://www.pdfdrive.com/manual-of-surgical-pathology-d58383470.html

Aside from those there are boundless heavy books on anatomy, physiology, pathology, lab tests etc.

LEXIS is a legal subscription service (fee) for researching legal topics, used by paralegals but also can be used by civilians who have a general knowledge of how the law is categorized.

NOLO Press in Berkeley may have some lay law books that describe legal education. You could probably call them directly and ask, because their goal is the de-mystification of legal process for plebs.
2   SunnyvaleCA   2024 Feb 9, 11:56pm  

You could get some of the books that are "banned" in Florida K-3 school libraries. Those are probably required reading now, at least for medical students.
3   Ceffer   2024 Feb 10, 10:09am  

https://lawpreview.barbri.com/law-school-curriculum/

Seems to be the generic that most law schools do.

First year law school curriculum: What to expect
Samantha Weller/Last Updated: March 29, 2021
So you’ve rocked the LSAT, been accepted to law school, and sent your letter of acceptance: what happens now? First year is the most important year of law school. Your 1L grades will determine your class rank, the academic honors you’re awarded, and the job opportunities that are offered to you. With this in mind, what can you expect during your 1L law school curriculum?

Teaching method
During 1L year, you’ll learn the material through the Case Method. This is the method in which students will read, brief, and analyze court cases and be expected to participate in classroom discussions surrounding those cases.

Law school professors will often facilitate this discussion through the Socratic Method approach, where students will be called upon at random (cold-calling) to help them draw their own conclusions about the legal rules and their underlying theories, presumptions, and utilities.

You can read more about the Case Method and the Socratic Method here.

The classes
In general, the same seven foundational classes are taught during 1L year of law school. Those classes are Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law and Procedure, Legal Research & Writing, and Property Law.

Civil Procedure
Also known as “Civ Pro,” this course teaches the students about the rules that the parties and judge must follow in civil cases. It covers the litigation method in the United States and the basics of a lawsuit, including pretrial procedures, discovery, motions, and appellate procedures.

Constitutional Law
Constitutional Law is an introduction to the U.S. Constitution and the different branches of U.S. government. It explores the separation of powers as well as individual constitutional rights and U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

You can also expect to take a deep dive into the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment while taking this course.

Contracts
Just as it sounds, this course is an overview of contracts, how they are formed, and what is considered a breach of contracts. It will also teach you about the damages that can occur when contracts are breached.

Torts
According to Cornell, “A tort is an act or omission that gives rise to injury or harm to another and amounts to a civil wrong for which courts impose liability. In the context of torts, “injury” describes the invasion of any legal right, whereas “harm” describes a loss or detriment in fact that an individual suffers.”

During this course, you’ll analyze the reasoning behind judgments in civil cases and the different types of claims (which can include battery, assault, trespass, or negligence).

Criminal Law and Procedure
Criminal Law will teach you what is classified as a “crime,” as well as the general principles of criminal liability. The course will analyze the rules for enforcing sanctions (a penalty for disobeying a rule or law) against those who have been accused of committing a crime. Most students consider this one of the most interesting classes in law school.

Legal Research and Writing
Considered one of the most useful classes in the law school curriculum, this is the course that will teach you how to research the law and how to write memos and briefs. It might also include teaching you how to present oral arguments in front of judges.

Property Law
Also known as “Real Property,” this course is an overview of the laws that govern purchase, possession, and sale of property in the U.S.

Considered one of the more difficult courses in law school, it analyzes the relationship between people and resources, land, buildings, and personal objects.

Summer jobs after 1L year
One of the most important reasons to ace your first semester of 1L year is to solidify your spot at the top of the class in preparation for OCI (On-Campus Interviewing). This is the process in which prestigious law firms and organizations visit law schools (or virtually, depending on COVID restrictions) and interview the best and brightest law students for summer employment before their 2L year.

This is important because when students do well in these roles, employers often extend an offer of permanent employment after law school. This is why it’s so crucial to do well your first semester of 1L year: these are the only grades these employers have to go off and will determine who they choose to interview.

How to get to the top of the class
Outside of making sure you’re dedicating enough time to your law school classes, students can also consider taking a law school prep course before starting their 1L year.

When you take the Law Preview course, real law professors teach you how to navigate the law school experience by introducing you to the core 1L material and proven strategies employed by the most successful students. This law school prep course gives you a comprehensive overview of the core classes you’ll be taking during your 1L law school curriculum.
4   Ceffer   2024 Feb 10, 10:28am  

Most medical schools have their students who have taken pre-med science courses, though I am not certain that is the case any more with the DEI crap going on.

First year is usually dissecting a cadaver and memorizing the parts. Courses on pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, pathophysiology, bacteriology, virology, genetics etc into the first two years. Clinical rotations generally start in the third year, firming up and elaborating the particulars that were taught in the generally first two years of scientific training with real clinical patients.

Med students are usually coddled in their undergrad, then thrown into the furnaces of medical madness to sink or swim in their internships, particularly at big city hospitals. Long hours, little sleep, memory banks filled, impossible pathologies faced day after day, constant unrelenting work and demands etc. etc. The purpose of this is medieval journeyman burnout, apparently, is to establish hierarchy amongst the cold survivors. Empathy faking and civil manners have to be relearned eventually for the paying patients.

Pharmacists generally take five to ten times the high level pharmacology courses compared to physicians. Doctors tend to fall prey early to the bribed collaborations with the Big Pharma pirates. They often don't know or care what is in the stuff they prescribe, and rely on the pharmacists to act as a safety net. However, the pharmacists don't tend to fight City Hall (Big Pharma) either, because their profits depend on referrals/volume sales and insurance/government reimbursements.

Courses on nutrition are generally about IV hospital maintenance mostly for electrolytes and IV nutrients. Doctors are not schooled much in 'health subtleties' and are generally lost when evaluating the various overlapping bell curves of genetic influence. They tend to have a 'threshold of obvious observable pathology' before they define problems. If it isn't easily observable, or doesn't pop up on a test, most don't have the chops to define it. Optimal nutrition and optimal vitamin therapies aren't really in their spectrum, unless they can observe and diagnose a fairly gross deficiency status.

The worst part, though, is that a lot of doctors are so narcissistic that they will not admit when they don't know something, so they fabricate ego palaces to live in and flog their patients with them. Caveat Emptor.

Please register to comment:

api   best comments   contact   latest images   memes   one year ago   random   suggestions