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A phone which does not spy on you


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2018 Aug 19, 10:49am   45,186 views  300 comments

by Patrick   ➕follow (60)   💰tip   ignore  

https://puri.sm/shop/librem-5/

Librem 5, the phone that focuses on security by design and privacy protection by default. Running Free/Libre and Open Source software and a GNU+Linux Operating System designed to create an open development utopia, rather than the walled gardens from all other phone providers.

A fully standards-based freedom-oriented system, based on Debian and many other upstream projects, has never been done before–we will be the first to seriously attempt this.

The Librem 5 phone will be the world’s first ever IP-native mobile handset, using end-to-end encrypted decentralized communication.


Many others have attempted Open Source phones and failed. I hope this one works, especially since I just discovered that you cannot turn off wifi or Bluetooth on Android or iOS. "Turning it off" in the controls on those phones merely disconnects you from current access points, but leaves them on so they can spy on your location with great precision and open you up to various exploits:

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/21/ios-11-apple-toggling-wifi-bluetooth-control-centre-doesnt-turn-them-off

On iOS 11, pressing the wifi toggle immediately disconnects the iPhone or iPad from any wifi networks, but leaves the wireless radio available for use by location services, scanning for the names of nearby wifi access points. The Bluetooth toggle operates in a similar fashion. ...

A similar thing happens in Android smartphones, which use wifi as part of their location services. Switching wifi off prevents it from connecting to wifi access points, but allows it to continue periodically scanning for access point names to help pinpoint its location.




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259   WookieMan   2024 Apr 23, 12:32am  

Patrick says





Eh, turn off FaceTime. Or pick up the phone and dial the number to make a reservation. Any restaurant worth going to is going to have a phone number you can call. You can't bitch out tech you don't like while using tech to try and make a reservation. Makes no sense when there's other means.
260   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 12:54am  

WookieMan says


You can't bitch out tech you don't like while using tech to try and make a reservation. Makes no sense when there's other means.


This is correct.

Here's all the tools of the world, the envy of every civilization before us. Make a tiny tiny bit of effort.

People whine and moan about censorship on YouTube, Facebook, Google, and still Twitter. There's alternatives - spend a few minutes, and I mean minutes, to search them out. People you follow being thrown off from sites? They are likely on Bitchute, Rumble, Odysee, Substack - seach them out there FIRST before watching them simply disappear.

25 years ago if companies pulled the shit that companies do now by suppressing content, engineers quit and users left. You're being programmed like a herd of sheep. Make a tiny amount of effort and you can't be controlled, and the effort isn't huge. You're coming out of the television age, finally, but don't fall into the next trap set for you. Google was taken over 15 years ago. Facebook has always been controlled by intelligence. Twitter was designed to be advertisement for celebrities and politicians from the start.

That's not to say Rumble, Gab, Substack, etc aren't another trap. They probably are, just learn to jump ship.

The question is, will you put up with propaganda and bullshit or not? It's your choice. Just recognize what propaganda is. If everybody is saying it, if it's being promoted all the time, that's propaganda. Never been easier to recognize it. False consensus. You know what sources lie to you by now I hope. Russian collusion, vaccines safe and effective, Qaddafi about to cause a humanitarian crisis? You must know. When they lie to you and don't admit "error", abandon them.
261   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 1:22am  

Patrick says

A similar thing happens in Android smartphones, which use wifi as part of their location services. Switching wifi off prevents it from connecting to wifi access points, but allows it to continue periodically scanning for access point names to help pinpoint its location.


I want to comment on this part of it. Yes, wifi can identify a location, but turn off GPS, that exactly locates you. You should only use GPS when you need it, it's power hungry anyhow.

Wifi identifies where wifi is available based on GPS, not the other way around. GPS should always be off, and using network services, just costs you money. Wifi should always be turned on, network services and GPS should always be off until you need it. You don't need Wifi turned on when you leave your home, when you have it on and GPS on, it's connecting location to Wifi. It's mapping open Wifi services based off from GPS. They don't bother to use triangulation (I think) to determine your location - why bother, most of you never turn off GPS.
262   WookieMan   2024 Apr 23, 4:56am  

richwicks says

They don't bother to use triangulation (I think) to determine your location - why bother, most of you never turn off GPS.

Even if you turn it off you're tracked. Above my level of knowledge personally. But my neighboring county has over 1M people and I know the 911 call center people at that office. Not gonna name the person or position as it could dox me, but high up. Even turning all the crap off doesn't stop police and first responders from tracking you. Unless your phone has legit dead battery, even off, you're trackable.

I don't think people understand this. If you want privacy you shouldn't have a phone. That's really all there is to it.
263   NuttBoxer   2024 Apr 23, 7:44am  

richwicks says

Wifi identifies where wifi is available based on GPS, not the other way around. GPS should always be off, and using network services, just costs you money. Wifi should always be turned on, network services and GPS should always be off until you need it. You don't need Wifi turned on when you leave your home, when you have it on and GPS on, it's connecting location to Wifi. It's mapping open Wifi services based off from GPS. They don't bother to use triangulation (I think) to determine your location - why bother, most of you never turn off GPS.


All this is based off an assumption that you CAN turn these off, and keep them off. We know for a fact that Apple collects location data. We know that the NSA has backdoors and is passively collecting everything. Unless you install a ROM like GrapheneOS, turning these services, and even your phone off is not a guarantee of privacy.

Don't give out your real name, or real address. Start there and you have a chance at privacy. Leave it up to your devices, no chance at all.
264   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 8:03am  

richwicks says

They don't bother to use triangulation (I think) to determine your location

Around here, the emergency services can locate you even if you just have a flip phone. I presume that is by triangulation.
265   NuttBoxer   2024 Apr 23, 8:08am  

I called 911 once when I had an old phone, guy had fractured his arm on a basketball court. Because I had turned off sharing location with emergency services, I had to give them directions. But this was like 15 years ago.
266   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 8:11am  

richwicks says

Wifi identifies where wifi is available based on GPS, not the other way around

That does not make any sense. There is no GPS database of all home and business WiFi locations, and every Android or IPhone I used would list any WiFi that they sensed was in range. If a close enough neighbor just now switches a new router with WiFi, I will see it appear on my phones WiFi list. Nothing to do with GPS.
267   RWSGFY   2024 Apr 23, 8:14am  

HeadSet says

richwicks says


Wifi identifies where wifi is available based on GPS, not the other way around

That does not make any sense. There is no GPS database of all home and business WiFi locations, and every Android or IPhone I used would list any WiFi that they sensed was in range. If a close enough neighbor just now switches a new router with WiFi, I will see it appear on my phones WiFi list. Nothing to do with GPS.


And the guy is supposedly an engineer in the field. :facepalm:

Cell phones can determine your location using Wi-Fi through a process known as Wi-Fi Positioning System (WPS). Here’s a simplified explanation of how it works:
Scanning Wi-Fi Access Points: Your device scans for nearby Wi-Fi access points and records their signal strength.
Creating a List: It creates a list of these Wi-Fi access points along with their signal strength at your current location.
Contacting Location Servers: Your device then contacts online servers that have a database of Wi-Fi access points and their geographical locations.
Determining Your Location: By comparing the list of Wi-Fi access points your device has detected with the database, the system can pinpoint your precise physical location.
This method is particularly useful when GPS is unavailable or unreliable, such as indoors where GPS signals may be weak or blocked. The Wi-Fi positioning system leverages the extensive Wi-Fi infrastructure in urban areas to provide accurate location information12.
It’s important to note that while this system can be very accurate, it also raises privacy concerns, as it means your location could potentially be tracked by businesses or other third parties if you’ve given them permission to do so2
268   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 8:32am  

RWSGFY says

Your device then contacts online servers that have a database of Wi-Fi access points and their geographical locations.

So there is a database of WiFi locations? Is this just for some predetermined and registered commercial spots? I do not see how home and business WiFi devices would automatically be added.
269   NuttBoxer   2024 Apr 23, 9:34am  

Do you know how much data collection your ISP is doing? Your cellular provider? Google, Apple, Microsoft, etc, etc...

You should be surprised if this doesn't exist.
270   RWSGFY   2024 Apr 23, 9:55am  

HeadSet says


RWSGFY says


Your device then contacts online servers that have a database of Wi-Fi access points and their geographical locations.

So there is a database of WiFi locations? Is this just for some predetermined and registered commercial spots? I do not see how home and business WiFi devices would automatically be added.



Provider knows.
271   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 11:05am  

HeadSet says

That does not make any sense. There is no GPS database of all home and business

Of course there is. Google maps is the most obvious example.

Traditional addresses are basically obsolete. They are used for mail, and that's it.
272   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 1:12pm  

richwicks says

HeadSet says


That does not make any sense. There is no GPS database of all home and business

Of course there is. Google maps is the most obvious example.

Traditional addresses are basically obsolete. They are used for mail, and that's it.

My complete sentence was "There is no GPS database of all home and business WiFi locations"

Do not truncate the sentence to imply I was talking about home and business locations alone, so you could make that inane reply. You goofed bigly with that statement "Wifi identifies where wifi is available based on GPS, not the other way around."

Own you error and move on.
273   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 1:20pm  

RWSGFY says

Provider knows.

How? All I get from the cable company is a modem. My WiFi sits on the other side of a NAT. All Cox knows is that I have a modem with one IP address, they do not know if I have a wired or wireless network on the other side, or even just a single computer plugged into the modem. I guess Cox could know if they supplied the modem/router combo.
274   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 1:53pm  

HeadSet says


My complete sentence was "There is no GPS database of all home and business WiFi locations"

When you are moving around with your phone with GPS and Wi-Fi on, your phone is collecting which location and wifi signals it can connect to.

Now is this information sent to Google? I don't know.

Google since its inception has collected every search that has ever been entered into it.

I can't see the use of collecting GPS location for wifi, but it can be done. If routers had a feature that allowed them to read and write digital phone signals, you could do away with cell towers.
275   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 2:37pm  

richwicks says

If routers had a feature that allowed them to read and write digital phone signals, you could do away with cell towers.

Are you really an engineer? That would require home/business WiFi routers to have huge antennas and an effective radiated power of around 100 watts.

richwicks says

When you are moving around with your phone with GPS and Wi-Fi on, your phone is collecting which location and wifi signals it can connect to.

Do you actually know this, or are you just guessing?
276   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 2:48pm  

HeadSet says


richwicks says


If routers had a feature that allowed them to read and write digital phone signals, you could do away with cell towers.

Are you really an engineer? That would require home/business WiFi routers to have huge antennas and an effective radiated power of around 100 watts.



Good fucking lord. If you are a an engineer of ANY SORT, you have just demonstrated extreme incompetence with that statement.

100 watts? Really? Really, you think it takes that much energy?

Instead of arguing with me here, why don't you go for a walk around your neighborhood and see if you can EVER find a time where you phone can't see a wifi signal? If you live in the sticks, it might be frequent but not if you live in suburbia.

HeadSet says


richwicks says


When you are moving around with your phone with GPS and Wi-Fi on, your phone is collecting which location and wifi signals it can connect to.

Do you actually know this, or are you just guessing?



Listen to me.

Google is an information collection agency. That's what they do. That's their MAIN PURPOSE and always has been. It has the side effect of allowing you to find information, and but their main job is surveillance.

How can we be in 2024 and you still not know this, when I've been posting to this board, for what, 5 years?

Read this article:

https://medium.com/worthix/google-nests-hidden-microphone-1d3e4a8337b6

They put a fucking microphone in a thermostat. Now if you have ANY engineering experience you fucking goddamned well know that they don't add extra parts into a fucking design if if has no use. They make boards sometimes with spaces for future parts, but they leave unpopulated.

It's a spy device. 25 years ago this would have been an incredible scandal, but in 25 years, everybody around me has become dumb, fucking, sheep. Stupid.

Any information they can collect they do. We gave up on blowing the whistle over a decade ago, because you don't mind being slaves apparently.

I have been struggling over the last few years, should I just go evil and fuck you all? Maybe. YouTube is censored "oh gee, gubermint please change google", they are the ones doing it. There's already alternatives, you just won't search them out. You know how easy it is to make certain your camera is off on your phone? Just put an LED in series with the powerline to the camera, make it a law - when the camera is being fed power, the led will light up. Put a cover on it.

They were spying on school students once:

https://www.computerworld.com/article/1553878/pennsylvania-schools-spying-on-students-using-laptop-webcams-claims-lawsuit.html

There should have been a revolt, not a lawsuit. There should have been some people strung up. Nobody knew the camera was in use, think children were getting undressed and dressed in front of those cameras ever? What the fuck was that about?

I just get so disgusted with the public. The amount of bullshit you fuckers will put up with is the same amount of bullshit I'm FORCED to put up with. Maybe I should just go to the other side. Fuck it.
277   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 3:52pm  

richwicks says

A 100 watts? Really? Really, you think it takes that much energy?

Yes, I do. The fact that my phone can see lots of WiFi spots in a housing development is irrelevant. Why do cell tower antennas have 100 watt amps feeding them? Do you think it is because of the distance between towers requires that power to reach the mobile phones in its area? If so, how do the mobiles phones with well under a watt (some may be up to 2 watts) transmit back to the tower? Stick to the point, and do not come back with an answer to a tangential question - Why does the tower need 100 watts power when the phone answering back only needs well under a watt? Do not come back with a dodge like "if the towers were as common as Wifi routers they would not need that much power." Also do not say that the towers need that 100 watts to talk to other towers. Hey, maybe your answer will make me look like a fool, as I have been wrong before.

richwicks says

Do you actually know this, or are you just guessing?

Listen to me.

Google is an information collection agency. That's what they do. That's their MAIN PURPOSE and always has been. It has the side effect of allowing you to find information, and but their main job is surveillance.

So you are guessing.
278   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 4:16pm  

HeadSet says


Yes, I do. The fact that my phone can see lots of WiFi spots in a housing development is irrelevant. Why do cell tower antennas have 100 watt amps feeding them?


Because they go over a wider area. The original "cell" phones were radio transmitters, and it covered an entire city. You'd have to request a central operator to be able to connect, and time on it was super expensive. Now in the 1980's somebody came up with a good idea, instead having one frequency and one giant tower, lets have many towers and different overlapping frequencies, this was a "cell". When you move into on area to the next of coverage, you switch frequencies and towers, and it's so seamless, you don't notice it. Remember dropped phone calls? That's part of the reason it happened.

Cell towers are talking to hundreds, if not thousands of phones. They are passively receiving data all the time.

HeadSet says


Why does the tower need 100 watts power when the phone answering back only needs well under a watt?


Well, it's been a while since I've worked on anything remotely connected to cell phone communication, like 20 years, but it was because it wasn't a shaped waveform at all. You broadcast completely non directional. That's changed.

When you talk on a cell phone, what your phone is really doing is recording a small segment of your voice, digitizing that, putting it into temporary storage, and then when your phone is given permission to talk to the tower, it transmits that packet. Only one cell at a time is talking to the tower at least at that particular frequency, this is time division multiplex addressing - TDMA.

There might be 1000 people talking on cell phones at the same time, and the tower during that time gives each phone 1/1000th of the network time to communication, while it also deals with SMS and now Internet communication. A 1000 is way too low today.

HeadSet says


So you are guessing.


Dude, believe whatever you fucking like. Fuck all of you, you want to be slaves, be fucking slaves then. I'm DONE trying to explain to you motherfuckers what can and WILL be done to you.

Google was spying on you with NEST with an audio microphone. A school district was using webcams to spy on students.

How hard is it to collect wifi access points and GPS? Google is a data collection company.

https://www.theregister.com/2010/10/20/google_has_no_plans_to_resume_street_view_wifi_collection/

They were doing it with their mapping cars, you think they do it with your phone? NAAAAAAAAAAAAAH. "It's just a wild guess on your part, Rich, DUUUUUUUUH. I have all the intelligence a cow".

You're so fucking naive. I have been moral and diligent to try to warn you shiftless fuckers what is coming down the pike. They will enslave you, and maybe you'll escape, because you'll die before they succeed, but your kids won't, and their kids certainly won't. You won't do a fucking thing to stop it. You won't even acknowledge it.

I have spent 30 years trying to help. Fuck all of you, you deserve to be living in 1984. Doesn't matter how much you're warned. We need help to stop this, I'm one of the people that knows it's happening, you won't help, fuck you. I'm not working to stop it anymore. I'm going to work to implement it. Congratulations, you've made me a traitor to what I once thought was humanity, but isn't. You cattle and sheep deserve what you get. It's no wonder they hate you.
279   stereotomy   2024 Apr 23, 4:33pm  

WookieMan says

Even turning all the crap off doesn't stop police and first responders from tracking you. Unless your phone has legit dead battery, even off, you're trackable.

I don't think people understand this. If you want privacy you shouldn't have a phone. That's really all there is to it.

The only thing that will stop a smartphone from spying on you is a full metal (100% coverage) Faraday cage. You can pick up small metal boxes at the thrift stores. We tested several types of EM shielding - mylar, metal mesh, etc. but only 100% solid steel or other ferrous metal will stop the signals.

One of these days, I'll compare battery drawdown between unshielded and shielded phones. I expect the shielded phone to discharge 10X faster than the unshielded one.
280   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 4:55pm  

stereotomy says

One of these days, I'll compare battery drawdown between unshielded and shielded phones. I expect the shielded phone to discharge 10X faster than the unshielded one.


If your phone is on and cannot reach a cell tower, it will expend a lot of power trying to find one. I've had this happen to me once, so I'm in the habit now when I'm in an area without good cell coverage, I just turn the phone off. Seems like a bad design, but I don't know the specifics of how modern phones work.
281   stereotomy   2024 Apr 23, 5:58pm  

richwicks says

stereotomy says


One of these days, I'll compare battery drawdown between unshielded and shielded phones. I expect the shielded phone to discharge 10X faster than the unshielded one.


If your phone is on and cannot reach a cell tower, it will expend a lot of power trying to find one. I've had this happen to me once, so I'm in the habit now when I'm in an area without good cell coverage, I just turn the phone off. Seems like a bad design, but I don't know the specifics of how modern phones work.

I should clarify: I would turn the phone off, then measure charge after about a week. I suspect that even off, the phone is probably spying, or could be periodically woken up by the NSA to eavesdrop, who knows?
282   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 6:04pm  

richwicks says

HeadSet says

So you are guessing.

Dude, believe whatever you fucking like. Fuck all of you, you want to be slaves, be fucking slaves then. I'm DONE trying to explain to you motherfuckers what can and WILL be done to you.

Whoa, calm down. We were talking about a specific - that you said When you are moving around with your phone with GPS and Wi-Fi on, your phone is collecting which location and wifi signals it can connect to.

Just admit that you do not know if this is true instead of launching into your Special Theory of GoogleEvilty.
283   WookieMan   2024 Apr 23, 6:09pm  

stereotomy says

I suspect that even off, the phone is probably spying, or could be periodically woken up by the NSA to eavesdrop, who knows?

100% does. It's not even a debate. One of the many reasons I won't buy a Tesla. My 2012 Armada has a remote air bag sensor. I get a postcard every week to get the airbag fixed. Takata bull shit. We're on the front end of EV's. I'm talking a 12 year old car. The lawsuits on EV's really haven't even started.

Back to phones. They for sure can track you when off. I can hold down one button on almost any phone I know of and contact 911 How is that? If you don't want to be tracked, I just wouldn't own a phone. Or at minimum fuck with them so the data is trash.
284   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 6:11pm  

richwicks says

HeadSet says

Why does the tower need 100 watts power when the phone answering back only needs well under a watt?

Well, it's been a while since I've worked on anything remotely connected to cell phone communication, like 20 years, but it was because it wasn't a shaped waveform at all. You broadcast completely non directional. That's changed.

Well, beam formed a little since there was no point in a tower broadcasting upward. But the mobile phones are not beamed formed at all, so the question remains - Why does the tower need 100 watts power when the phone answering back only needs well under a watt?
285   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 6:14pm  

stereotomy says

I should clarify: I would turn the phone off, then measure charge after about a week. I suspect that even off, the phone is probably spying, or could be periodically woken up by the NSA to eavesdrop, who knows?


Well, I've had a phone off for months immediately return to life. I don't think you'll notice a difference.

I'm certain phones can fake being "off", I know cameras and microphones can't be guaranteed to be disabled, but turning it off, that's easy to notice.
286   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 6:23pm  

HeadSet says

Whoa, calm down. We were talking about a specific - that you said When you are moving around with your phone with GPS and Wi-Fi on, your phone is collecting which location and wifi signals it can connect to.


The data is there, Google has collected information through their vehicles that map streets, Google is right now getting sued over the fact that "Icognito mode" on Chrome does NOTHING, they have placed microphones into thermostats - they're scum.

I'm just telling you how TRIVIAL it is to do, and I know what companies do when it's trivial to do. They don't have to add hardware. I don't think there is much reason to do it now. Everybody has a cell phone, you probably have a router, there done. They know your location when you turn your phone on, they know your router that you connect to with your phone - finished. Why would they collect this information? I don't know, but I do know all they do as a company is collect information.

HeadSet says

Just admit that you do not know if this is true instead of launching into your Special Theory of GoogleEvilty.


Let me re-iterate, they were collecting information from the Google cars on WiFi Hotspots, and they quit when they started producing phones and all Google does is collect information.

The very first Android phone was in 2008, they stopped collecting information in 2010 from their cars.

If the information is there, they will collect it, why not? I admit I cannot see it as being too useful. They can identify metadata with it, but it's a crude way of doing it. The fact they can do it, given Google's history, means they do. They have a 100% track record of this. They are a data collection company, a private intelligence firm, although not really that private.
287   WookieMan   2024 Apr 23, 6:24pm  

richwicks says

If your phone is on and cannot reach a cell tower, it will expend a lot of power trying to find one. I've had this happen to me once, so I'm in the habit now when I'm in an area without good cell coverage, I just turn the phone off. Seems like a bad design, but I don't know the specifics of how modern phones work.

If you're in an area with poor signal. Enjoy it. Turn it off. With kids I need it. If I was a bachelor I wouldn't have the thing turned on outside of work hours. I don't answer the phone anyway. Lawyer in me, I'd just never answer the phone. Never say/acknowledge your name. Be a dick. I love phone arguments.
288   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 6:28pm  

HeadSet says


Well, beam formed a little since there was no point in a tower broadcasting upward. But the mobile phones are not beamed formed at all, so the question remains - Why does the tower need 100 watts power when the phone answering back only needs well under a watt?


Look, I'm not an expert in cell technology but a tower is a lot more active than a phone. Your phone is MOSTLY doing nothing, even during a conversation.

I'm just giving you a HYPOTHESIS of why they may have been collecting data on GPS and WiFi. It could have just been research. I have thought of this myself, why not replace the vast majority of cell towers with modems? Voice data isn't large in comparison to most of what we do on the Internet now, which is video. Why not just use another frequency to handle telephone calls and let any owner of a wifi network (which is everybody now), do it?

Maybe the data is useless, but I know Google collects ALL DATA THEY CAN, because you don't know what might be useful later.

I know, for a FACT, every search and ip address associated with that search, has been stored by Google. How is this useful? Well, perhaps to build up a psychological profile of the user over time, or the IP address, or a family? Who knows? I bet Google doesn't know, but 30 years of data, maybe they can make a product out of all this information?
289   HeadSet   2024 Apr 23, 6:50pm  

richwicks says

Voice data isn't large in comparison to most of what we do on the Internet now, which is video.

Ah, but remember that cable company modems now have competition from Verizon et al 5g "internet" that can deliver 100meg bandwidth. Lots of 4k video will be passed over that, it will hardly be restricted to voice. The future of the internet in many areas will be from cell towers.
290   richwicks   2024 Apr 23, 7:26pm  

HeadSet says

The future of the internet in many areas will be from cell towers.


Possibly. We use QAM for data transmission, and we're beyond where I thought we could go, and there's shaped wave forms, it's impossible to tell.

I can tell you this, if we do move to a society that only accesses the internet through cell technology, you'll be behind a NAT and you will be dependent on a 3rd party to connect to anybody. You will have to go through some sort of authority for EVERYTHING, every communication. If we go there, freedom of speech is dead.

I have my own website on my own computer, sitting away from me 2 feet away. I can't lose it because of a 3rd party says they won't host it. I have 100% control over this. That will go away if I'm placed behind a NAT router I cannot control.
292   Patrick   2024 Jun 13, 4:18pm  

Just ran across this. I have no affiliation with them and get no money for posting it. But I approve of it.


295   WookieMan   2024 Jun 19, 6:12am  

Patrick says





Are they still doing this out there in CA? I haven't seen it since roughly the end of 2022 and that was only at airports. I actually don't mind it. Having to print updated menus as items change is kind of a bitch, especially for non-chain restaurants. Passes costs down to the customer.

But I do get it's one more layer of tracking. I'm clearly indifferent on it. If I know a place has slow service, sometimes being able to put in the order directly to the kitchen is better. Especially flying as they're notoriously slow and black service wise.
296   GreaterNYCDude   2024 Jun 19, 6:39am  

richwicks says

The_Deplorable says







This seriously happens. If you have an Alexa or a Google Home, or possibly even Siri - fake a discussion about a pet you'd never own with your family, and see what ads you start getting.

They are 24/7 listening devices. This is a simple test. I've gotten a FEW people to try it, but not with Siri. It's the 1984's telescreen. I'm giving you a test so you can verify it's true, if you don't do the test, whatever. We've been trying to warn you for years.

I have had this happen. Not talking about a pet I'd never own, but about something obscure; a few days later... Ad for said I secure thing. And I don't have an Alexa or Siri or any of that crap. Just my android phone and a couple of laptops.

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