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The Rin Pill has a new ally ... Artemisinin


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2022 Oct 11, 7:14pm   895 views  17 comments

by Rin   ➕follow (6)   💰tip ($0.15 in tips)  

Looks like someone's figured out that by coupling a bioavailable version of Quercetin (Phytosome) & a more bioavailable Sweet Wormwood, Liposomal Artemisinin, that one can have an even better product.

Comments 1 - 17 of 17   

1   Rin   2022 Oct 11, 7:14pm  

Check 'em out on Amazon. There are various competitors of the same thing.
2   Ceffer   2022 Oct 11, 7:28pm  

Thanks again, Rin.
3   AmericanKulak   2022 Oct 11, 7:30pm  

Thanks, Rin!
4   porkchopexpress   2022 Oct 11, 7:46pm  

Thanks. I just ordered me some. Is it ok to take this as a maintenance dose long term?
5   Rin   2022 Oct 11, 7:53pm  

porkchopexpress says

Thanks. I just ordered me some. Is it ok to take this as a maintenance dose long term?


Yes, I believe so, however, if you want to use a double down maintenance strategy, take the Que/Art combo, once a day, and then, the Thorne (or competitor) Quercetin Phytosome pill alone, at night. And of course, don't forget Allisure Allicin, R-Lipoic Acid, Vita D, Zinc, etc.
6   mell   2022 Oct 11, 8:17pm  

Artemisinin has anti microbial properties and may have side effects. Don’t know this particular formulation, it's a great but potent natural drug. Will check this formulation out.
7   EBGuy   2022 Oct 11, 8:42pm  

Wild, did not know about this (3rd century Chinese Traditional Medicine)....
Returning to the earliest record of the use of Qinghao to treat malarial symptoms, which was in Ge Hong’s Zhouhou Beiji Fang (Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergency), Tu noted that the instructions for the Qinghao prescription involved consuming the strained “juice” of the Qinghao plant immersed in water. It was notable that the instruction made no mention of heating the medicine—something that was otherwise common for prescriptions in TCM. Drawing from the literature and her own knowledge of TCM, Tu arrived at the idea to modify the extraction process to use low-temperature conditions. The extracts produced from this new procedure were further purified by separation of the acidic and neutral phases in order to retain active components while reducing the toxicity of the original extract. The resultant substance displayed a striking 100% effectiveness against rodent malaria in experiments carried out around October 1971. This remarkable result was then fully reproduced in monkey malaria experiments carried out in late December of the same year, thus establishing the efficacy of the Qinghao extract beyond doubt [1].
The breakthrough had been made, but the journey of drug development was by no means complete. Conditions in China at that time made it difficult to perform clinical trials of new drug candidates to ascertain their safety for humans. In an attempt to accelerate the process due to the seasonal and time-sensitive nature of malarial research, Tu and colleagues decided to volunteer themselves as the first human subjects for toxicity and dose-finding tests [8]. This act established the safety profile of the Qinghao extract and enabled clinical trials to be carried out immediately, in the latter half of 1972. The trials (which were carried out in Hainan Province and at the 302 Hospital PLA (now incorporated into the Fifth Medical Center of the Chinese PLA General Hospital) in Beijing) proved successful, and paved the way for Qinghao research to be pushed to the national level. A subsequent concerted effort on the part of the Chinese scientific community at large drove further research and development of Qinghao forward. The active component of the Qinghao extract, artemisinin (also known as Qinghaosu) itself, was isolated in November 1972 by Tu’s team at the Institute of Chinese Materia Medica. The team would later go on to develop dihydroartemisinin (DHA), which remains one of the most pharmacologically relevant derivatives today.
8   porkchopexpress   2022 Oct 12, 7:02am  

Rin says

porkchopexpress says


Thanks. I just ordered me some. Is it ok to take this as a maintenance dose long term?


Yes, I believe so, however, if you want to use a double down maintenance strategy, take the Que/Art combo, once a day, and then, the Thorne (or competitor) Quercetin Phytosome pill alone, at night. And of course, don't forget Allisure Allicin, R-Lipoic Acid, Vita D, Zinc, etc.
I take a MegaFood multi each day plus Vit D if I don't get sun exposure that day. I also take Quercetin Phytosome, R-Lipoic Acid, Allicin and Curcumin Phytosome daily. I don't add Zinc unless I'm exposed to sickness or start feeling any symptoms because I've heard it can mess with Copper levels. Plus, I've read you don't need a lot of zinc but I could be wrong.
9   Rin   2022 Oct 12, 12:31pm  

porkchopexpress says

I've read you don't need a lot of zinc but I could be wrong.


No you don't need much.

mell says

it's a great but potent natural drug


Yes, which is why I think that taking additional Quercetin Phytosome, like loading up to 500 to 1500 mg/day, should be done alone using let's say Thorne's formulation of Que.
10   The_Deplorable   2023 Jan 18, 4:56pm  

Rin says
The Rin Pill has a new ally ... Artemisinin

Rin,

Can you please explain Artemisinin in plain English to the rest of us (assume we are not into vitamins but take supplements as we need them).

My simple understanding for example of Zinc Quercetin is that it is a Zinc Ionophore like HCQ that prevents Covid from replicating and wipes it out. I saw recently that Zinc Quercetin became a top recommendation by America's Front Line Doctors against Covid (Sorry I don't have the link off the top but see studies here https://c19early.org/qmeta.html ).

I just did a search on Google and Amazon where I looked up "Artemisia Formula" and learned that it is also an antimalarial medication that also works against parasites such as Lyme disease etc. And this (in my mind) explains your comment that Artemisinin is like an over the counter version of Ivermectin - meaning antiparasitic.

The_Deplorable
11   The_Deplorable   2023 Jan 24, 12:39pm  

The Story of Artemisin

This is from searching the internet...

In a nutshell, the anti-parasitic medication Artemisin was invented to cure Malaria.

Malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium, which infects the red blood cells and accumulates in the liver where it multiplies and spreads and finally kills the infected person. In the 1960s, a Chloroquine resistant strain of Malaria appeared that made Malaria deadlier.

In response, Dr. Tu Youyou - a young Chinese medical doctor - was assigned the task to find a cure for this Chloroquine resistant Malaria. Dr. Tu Youyou searched old Chinese literature on herbal medicine and found a very promising lead from a 400 AD text. The plant Artemisia Annua, in the Daisy family. This 1,700 year old reference claimed that the extract from Artemisia Annua cures Malaria.

At first, the Tu Youyou team boiled the plant to obtain the extractant and discovered that this does not cure Malaria. And this because the old Chinese text specified the use of cold water not boiling water, so back to square one.

They tried again using cold water with ether to obtain the extractant, and this cured the Malaria in mice and monkeys 100% of the time. Then she tried this on herself for side effects and found none. She then gave this extractant to 21 Malaria patients and all of them recovered. The active compound that cured Malaria was later identified as Artemisin.

In addition to China and Asia the plant grows around the world especially the Mediterranean.

In 2015 the Nobel Prize for Medicine went to Dr. Tu Youyou for the invention of Artemisin (50%) and to Dr. William C. Campbell and Dr.Satoshi Omura (each 25%) for the invention of Ivermectin. "This year’s Nobel Laureates have developed therapies that have revolutionized the treatment of some of the most devastating parasitic diseases." https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2015/press-release/

--To obtain Ivermectin go to Tennessee where it is an over the counter medication.

--Artemisin on the other hand is available without a prescription as a vitamin!

The_Deplorable
12   Rin   2023 Jan 24, 11:36pm  

The_Deplorable says


In 2015 the Nobel Prize for Medicine went to Dr. Tu Youyou for the invention of Artemisin (50%) and to Dr. William C. Campbell and Dr.Satoshi Omura (each 25%) for the invention of Ivermectin. "This year’s Nobel Laureates have developed therapies that have revolutionized the treatment of some of the most devastating parasitic diseases." https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2015/press-release/

--To obtain Ivermectin go to Tennessee where it is an over the counter medication.


I take a short sojourn from the forum & you've pretty much answered your own question.

Here's another difference, the Artemisinin extract is some 200 mg per capsule, however, Ivermectin has an adult dosage level of only 12-15 mg per pill. And that's significant, as the latter is a potent pharmaceutical whereas the former is a mere plant extract.

Now, here's what's important ... why take a strong pharma (albeit, off patent & off label) when if you combine Artemisinin with Quercetin, that you have the best one-two natural knockout blow against a vast array of viruses, including Covid, out there? And then, synergize with Allisure Allicin, Vitamin D, Aspirin/White Willow Bark, R-Lipoic Acid, N-Acetyl-Cysteine, Zinc/Copper, etc, you have a complete war chest against a vast majority of the infections out there.

The pandemic could have ended, summer of 2020, if the above were administered globally, that is if the CDC, WHO (not the rock band starring Pete Townsend & Roger Daltrey), NIH, and FDA weren't a bunch of Big Pharma douchebags.
13   AmericanKulak   2023 Jan 25, 12:49am  

@Rin, good to see you back.

Ah, Artemisinin is wormwood

What do Ivermectin and Wormwood have in common? Well, the latter was the traditional dewormer prior to the 20th Century, used for millenium across Eurasia.

Interesting, so what is the common chemistry between parasites and respiratory viruses? Perhaps they share some replication process proteins that are disrupted by the same compounds?
14   porkchopexpress   2023 Jan 25, 4:50am  

"I touch myself and see you before me."

- The Divinyls
15   RC2006   2023 Jan 25, 8:42am  

Anybody here tried NAD?
16   The_Deplorable   2023 Jan 25, 2:04pm  

AmericanKulak says
so what is the common chemistry between parasites and respiratory viruses?

Good question!

To me it looks like the human immune system treats the cold viruses as another parasite and that is why HCQ, Ivermectin and Artemisin kill the Covid virus in zero flat.

This explains why, when people in the Tropics get the flu or a cold, they take HCQ and within a couple of days they are cured. No need to take Antihistamines, Cough syrups, expectorants, nasal decongestants, napkins etc for a couple of weeks. In a nutshell, what we learned from Covid has in effect wiped out the multibillion dollar cold/flu industry. Right now I have HCQ, Ivermectin and Quercetin in my medicine cabinet and I am going to add Artemisin.

The_Deplorable
17   Rin   2023 Jan 28, 2:02pm  

The_Deplorable says


human immune system treats the cold viruses as another parasite


In this particular situation, a parasite is a type of fungus, much like the yeast for bread making, however, more pathogenic and dangerous like ringworm or candida.

How a drug or supplement interferes with a fungus vs a virus involves different pathways and that's not very clear at the time.

My other favorite supplement, Allisure Allicin (the active ingredient in garlic) involves immuno-modulation to prevent viral infection but doesn't directly inhibit their growth unlike in the case for a bacteria like Staph. So to get the best one-two punch out of it is to take it with Quercetin Phytosome, which is not only a Zinc ionosphore but also inhibits viral perfusion and propagation.

The_Deplorable says


Right now I have HCQ, Ivermectin and Quercetin in my medicine cabinet and I am going to add Artemisin.


Keep the pharmas, HCQ/Ivermectin for emergencies.

It's better to take the natural stuff (Quercetin Phytosome, Allisure Allicin, Artemisinin, R-Lipoic Acid) for daily prophylaxis as a small amount goes a long way & doesn't stress the body into developing tolerance over time.

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