8
2

Not So Fast on Electric Cars - WSJ


 invite response                
2022 Dec 26, 9:49am   27,766 views  695 comments

by RWSGFY   ➕follow (4)   💰tip   ignore  

Not So Fast on Electric Cars - WSJ

Allysia FinleyDec. 25, 2022 6:20 pm ET

Toyota’s CEO delivers a timely warning, and many states echo it.

Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda recently caused the climate lobby to blow a fuse by speaking a truth about battery electric vehicles that his fellow auto executives dare not. “Just like the fully autonomous cars that we were all supposed to be driving by now,” Mr. Toyoda said in Thailand, “I think BEVs are just going to take longer to become mainstream than the media would like us to believe.” He added that a “silent majority” in the auto industry share his view, “but they think it’s the trend, so they can’t speak out loudly.”
The Biden administration seems to believe that millions of Americans will rush out to buy electric vehicles if only the government throws enough subsidies at them. Last year’s infrastructure bill included $7.5 billion in grants for states to expand their charging networks. But it’s a problem when even the states are warning the administration that electric vehicles aren’t ready to go mainstream.

Maine notes in a plan submitted to the Federal Highway Administration this summer that “cold temperatures will remain a top challenge” for adoption, since “cold weather reduces EV range and increases charging times.” When temperatures drop to 5 degrees Fahrenheit, the cars achieve only 54% of their quoted range. A vehicle that’s supposed to be able to go 250 miles between charges will make it only 135 miles on average. At 32 degrees—a typical winter day in much of the country—a Tesla Model 3 that in ideal conditions can go 282 miles between charges will make it only 173 miles.
Imagine if the 100 million Americans who took to the road over the holidays were driving electric cars. How many would have been stranded as temperatures plunged? There wouldn’t be enough tow trucks—or emergency medics—for people freezing in their cars.
The Transportation Department is requiring states to build charging stations every 50 miles along interstate highways and within a mile of off-ramps to reduce the likelihood of these scenarios. But most state electrical grids aren’t built to handle this many charging stations and will thus require expensive upgrades. Illinois, for one, warns of “challenges related to sufficient electric grid capacity, particularly in rural areas of the state.”

Charging stations in rural areas with little traffic are also unlikely to be profitable and could become “stranded assets,” as many states warn. Wyoming says out-of-state traffic from non-Tesla electric vehicles would have to increase 100-fold to cover charger costs under the administration’s rules. Tesla has already scoped out premier charging locations for its proprietary network. Good luck to competitors.

New Mexico warns that “poor station maintenance can lead to stations being perpetually broken and unusable, particularly in rural or hard to access locations. If an EV charging station is built in an area without electrical capacity and infrastructure to support its use, it will be unusable until the appropriate upgrades are installed.”

Read More Life Science

• Where Was Biden’s SEC Sheriff on Sam Bankman-Fried? December 18, 2022
• Western Scientists Cheered On China’s Covid Repression December 11, 2022
• Hardly Anyone Is Buying Biden’s Bivalent Boosters December 4, 2022
Arizona says “private businesses may build and operate a station if a grant pays for the first five years of operations and maintenance” but might abandon the project if it later proves unprofitable. Many other states echo this concern, noting that federal funds could result in stranded assets.

The administration aims to build 500,000 stations, but states will likely have to spend their own money to keep them running. Like other federal inducements, these grants may entice states to assume what could become huge financial liabilities.

Federal funds also come with many rules, including “buy America” procurement requirements, which demand that chargers consist of mostly U.S.-made components. New Jersey says these could “delay implementation by several years” since only a few manufacturers can currently meet them. New York also says it will be challenging to comply with the web of federal rules, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, and a 1960 federal law that bars charging stations in rest areas.

Oh, and labor rules. The administration requires that electrical workers who install and maintain the stations be certified by the union-backed Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program. New Mexico says much of the state lacks contractors that meet this mandate, which will reduce competition and increase costs.

Technical problems abound too. Virginia says fast-charging hardware “has a short track record” and is “prone to malfunctions.” Equipment “previously installed privately in Virginia has had a high failure rate shown in user comments and reports on social media,” and “even compatibility with credit card readers has been unexpectedly complicated.”

A study this spring led by University of California researchers found that more than a quarter of public direct-current fast-charging stations in the San Francisco Bay Area were unusable. Drivers will be playing roulette every time they head to a station. If all this weren’t disconcerting enough, Arizona warns cyber vulnerabilities could compromise customer financial transactions, charging infrastructure, electric vehicles and the grid.

Politicians and auto makers racing to eliminate the internal-combustion engine are bound to crash into technological, logistic and financial realities, as Mr. Toyoda warned. The casualties will be taxpayers, but the administration doesn’t seem to care.


https://archive.vn/pcjK3

Comments 1 - 40 of 695       Last »     Search these comments

1   HeadSet   2022 Dec 26, 3:06pm  

RWSGFY says

Politicians and auto makers racing to eliminate the internal-combustion engine are bound to crash into technological, logistic and financial realities, as Mr. Toyoda warned. The casualties will be taxpayers, but the administration doesn’t seem to care.

I am surprised that no one seems to see what I see. Biden's Administration does not care because all is going fine for their goal. The plan is not to substitute electric mobility for ICE, the plan is for the public to stop driving while reserving personal transportation to politicians and the connected rich. Joe Citizen will take the bus while living in clustered cities. The "financial reality" is that an electric car in 2035 will cost the equivalent of $100,000 and be subject to high road use and mileage taxes to "pay for infrastructure." Get used to riding by bus or subway, living close to work in order to walk or cycle, and at best using a shared ride service, where something like 15 passenger van is summoned and scheduled by app to picked up and drop off people in an optimized route.
2   WookieMan   2022 Dec 26, 3:18pm  

HeadSet says

I am surprised that no one seems to see what I see. Biden's Administration does not care because all is going fine for their goal. The plan is not to substitute electric mobility for ICE, the plan is for the public to stop driving while reserving personal transportation to politicians and the connected rich.

Makes sense, but I have no intention of giving up my big cars. I NEED them. Not a want. Until EV/Car manufacturers solve that problem, 90% of America will not adopt EVs. SFBA, LA, NYC, MIA, etc, fine, they work over short commuter distances.

It really can't work in a place like IL as the OP states or Wyoming. Most of IL is cornfields. Rockford, Decatur, Champaign, Peoria and Springfield are the next biggest and they're all spread out. EVs are and will always be for city dwellers that don't travel at all outside the "zone" so to speak. Let the private market figure it out. Zero tax dollars should be going to EV's (and a lot of other things...).
3   DhammaStep   2022 Dec 26, 3:23pm  

Tesla Owner Stranded At Supercharger Station On Christmas Eve After Cold Weather Paralyzes Battery

BY TYLER DURDEN

SUNDAY, DEC 25, 2022 - 10:45 AM

Besides freezing door handles, Tesla owners who braved the cold this Christmas weekend were met with 'winter range anxiety.' As we explained last week, cold weather will degrade battery performance. At least one video went viral on Christmas Eve of a person whose Model S wouldn't charge in the cold at a Supercharger station.

Domenick Nati, 44, a resident of Lynchburg, Virginia, rolled into a Supercharger station Saturday afternoon with 19 miles left of charge. The Tesla's dashboard showed outside temperatures were 19 degrees Fahrenheit. He made a video about his awful experience over the last 24 hours. 

In a video posted on TikTok, Nati said battery issues began on Friday when his Tesla wouldn't warm up so it could charge. He tried charging at his house and a Supercharger station, but nothing seemed to work. In a last-ditch effort, he went to Supercharger station on Christmas Eve, where he experienced the same issues. 

https://www.zerohedge.com/technology/tesla-owner-stranded-supercharger-christmas-eve-after-cold-weather-paralyzes-battery

Hard no from me. A vehicle is a lifeline. If it is unreliable, it can actually put you in more danger than simply without it.
4   Onvacation   2022 Dec 26, 4:19pm  

Those charging cables have a lot of stealable copper.
5   HeadSet   2022 Dec 26, 7:28pm  

WookieMan says

Makes sense, but I have no intention of giving up my big cars.

You will when gasoline has been phased out and is no longer available.
6   Eman   2022 Dec 26, 8:12pm  

“In a video posted on TikTok, Nati said battery issues began on Friday when his Tesla wouldn't warm up so it could charge. He tried charging at his house and a Supercharger station, but nothing seemed to work. In a last-ditch effort, he went to Supercharger station on Christmas Eve, where he experienced the same issues.”

- The freaking car had “charging issue” both at home and at the supercharger. He knew about it. Why is it a problem? Am I missing something here? Any person with half a brain would use another car.
7   Eman   2022 Dec 26, 8:13pm  

Onvacation says

Those charging cables have a lot of stealable copper.

😂….That’s a rough way to make a living. Hope the thief doesn’t get electrocuted
8   rocketjoe79   2022 Dec 27, 8:13am  

Onvacation says

Those charging cables have a lot of stealable copper.

Most States have outlawed non-registered recyclers (homeless, single parties (AKA thieves)) to bring in copper to recycling centers.
9   zzyzzx   2022 Dec 27, 8:58am  

Well the stupid thing that California did to ban new ICE vehicles after a certain year is part of their emissions crap, so it applies to a bunch of other states. For some reason all the articles on this CA law failed to mention this. Fortunately Maryland declined to renew, for now. So Maryland won't be using CA emissions on new cars for a year or two. Our new Democrat governor (as of next January) is sure to sign up for this nonsense, but that won't take effect for a while so MD might be the only place exempted from this nonsense for a while, even if brief. Hopefully I will be living someplace else when this eventually happens.
10   Onvacation   2022 Dec 27, 6:27pm  

rocketjoe79 says

Most States have outlawed non-registered recyclers (homeless, single parties (AKA thieves)) to bring in copper to recycling centers.

If states outlaw copper recycling only outlaws will recycle copper. Laws don't stop thieves.
11   RWSGFY   2022 Dec 27, 6:30pm  

rocketjoe79 says

Onvacation says


Those charging cables have a lot of stealable copper.

Most States have outlawed non-registered recyclers (homeless, single parties (AKA thieves)) to bring in copper to recycling centers.


They will do the same thing they do with stolen converters: pack them into containers and ship overseas.
12   PeopleUnited   2022 Dec 28, 6:30pm  

HeadSet says

WookieMan says


Makes sense, but I have no intention of giving up my big cars.

You will when gasoline has been phased out and is no longer available.

People are willing to pay for gas, we have plenty of it and the infrastructure to find, refine and use more of it, why would it be “phased out”?

Oh that’s right, so the globalists can force us to be better slaves for them.
13   WookieMan   2023 Jan 6, 10:54am  

cisTits says





Lol. Joke? About peed my pants. I can tow 14k with a Honda civic. Is it safe? What’s my mileage?

You’ll get maybe 25-30 miles towing 14k on an EV. It’s a weight issue with electric. They’re batteries. We’d be doing it by now if we could. Ev’s are sedans and small SUV’s. The batteries to get the range and towing capacity make it impossible due to the weight of the batteries. And they’re actually light batteries. You’d need 3-4k lbs of batteries PLUS the load weight you tow. Ain’t happening without new tech.
14   HeadSet   2023 Jan 6, 1:19pm  

WookieMan says

You’ll get maybe 25-30 miles towing 14k on an EV.

Ah, but maybe that trailer is a just an external battery pack.
15   HeadSet   2023 Jan 6, 1:28pm  

WookieMan says

I can tow 14k with a Honda civic.

Even an F-150 or Chevy Silverado full sized pickup with the special towing package would have a hard time towing 14,000 lbs. My Pathfinder has a towing capacity of 6,000 lbs, and that is high for that class of vehicle, let alone for the much smaller Civic.
16   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   2023 Jan 6, 1:35pm  

In Idaho an electric car will be collecting rust not moving. I believe in Teslas genius to make great stuff, but they can't beat laws of physics and nature here. Those Teslas are great for CA/FL though where sun always shines and your solar panels go far.
17   EBGuy   2023 Jan 6, 1:58pm  

Tesla in pole position in Norway's race to EV goal
Four out of five new cars sold in Norway in 2022 were battery powered, led by Tesla, but some in the industry say new taxes could thwart the country's goal of becoming the first to end the sale of petrol and diesel automobiles by 2025.

Tesla Arctic Circle testimony:
I live nearly as far north in Europe as is possible, in the small town of Kirkenes on Norway’s coast by the Barents Sea. The Barents Observer covers stories from around the region, which means long distances in varied weather conditions. For about a year now, I have been driving my Tesla Model 3 around in the north, and have had very positive experiences by driving electric.
Last winter and this one have proven that electric is by no means a disadvantage in the Arctic. The car heats faster and better than my previous diesel Volvo, and even in very remote places, when parked without access to a plug, I don’t have to be afraid of the car not starting the next morning if it has been extremely cold at night.
One example: Last week I parked for four days at the airport in Kirkenes without a plug. Temperatures dropped to down to -32C. When I came back I turned on the heat via the Tesla app while waiting for luggage, and when I came to the car some 10-12 minutes later, all windows were without ice, the door was no problem to open, and I simply just jumped in and drove.
18   Tenpoundbass   2023 Jan 6, 9:07pm  

The Winter of 2023, has been Tesla's Soccer Mom Mini Van Super Bowl Commercial. An instant death nobody saw coming.
19   RWSGFY   2023 Jan 7, 10:55am  

cisTits says

EBGuy says


Four out of five new cars sold in Norway in 2022 were battery powered, led by Tesla, but some in the industry say new taxes could thwart the country's goal of becoming the first to end the sale of petrol and diesel automobiles by 2025.


I believe those numbers like I do Swedish rape stats.


They can be true, because Norway imposes draconian 100% tax on all passenger cars, except EVs.
20   rocketjoe79   2023 Jan 7, 3:49pm  

Tesla was in the top ten of ALL cars sold in the USA in 2022. Can't be all bad.
22   Hugh_Mongous   2023 Jan 7, 10:21pm  

rocketjoe79 says

Tesla was in the top ten of ALL cars sold in the USA in 2022. Can't be all bad.


They work as a niche product and do rightfully dominate their niche.
23   rocketjoe79   2023 Jan 8, 10:06am  

Hugh_Mongous says

rocketjoe79 says


Tesla was in the top ten of ALL cars sold in the USA in 2022. Can't be all bad.


They work as a niche product and do rightfully dominate their niche.

If Tesla continues their current growth rate, I predict the company will be #5 in 3 years. The Cybertruck, due to start making deliveries this year, has a 1.5 Million unit backlog, worth about $80 billion. I've been considering adding more Tesla Stock to my portfolio. I got "lucky" and made 5x the last time I cashed out. Paid for my Model Y.
24   Eman   2023 Jan 8, 10:34am  

Hugh_Mongous says

rocketjoe79 says


Tesla was in the top ten of ALL cars sold in the USA in 2022. Can't be all bad.


They work as a niche product and do rightfully dominate their niche.

I agree it’s a niche product. It’s not for everyone
25   WookieMan   2023 Jan 8, 2:26pm  

HeadSet says

WookieMan says


I can tow 14k with a Honda civic.

Even an F-150 or Chevy Silverado full sized pickup with the special towing package would have a hard time towing 14,000 lbs. My Pathfinder has a towing capacity of 6,000 lbs, and that is high for that class of vehicle, let alone for the much smaller Civic.

It's an over exaggeration on my end. It is possible with weight distribution hitches and substantially unsafe with a Civic. But it's doable. The energy needed to tow that amount over average distances, say 100-200 miles is not remotely possible with current tech with EV's. As I said a 14k trailer you're looking at 20-50 miles with an EV. It's pointless. It would take me 3 days to get to Nashville from Northern IL. 3 days back. I can do that is 6-7 hours now.

I'm looking at lithium golf cart batteries currently. While lighter, it's still a shit ton of weight. The physics don't work. Maybe the major auto companies lobby the fuck out of ICE vehicles. But EV's are decades away for people that tow stuff. 2050 best case is my estimate. And that's assuming much of the population dies off.

Ultimately you need coal, LGN or nukes to power a transportation network reliant on electric. They're pushing for solar and wind. Whatever....
26   Patrick   2023 Mar 27, 8:48pm  

https://igorchudov.substack.com/p/europe-abandons-all-electric-car


Europe Abandons All-Electric Car Mandate
Stupidity of "switch to electric" while killing power generation

Igor Chudov
1 hr ago

France24 and the Wall Street Journal (paywall-free link) report that the EU abandoned its much-ballyhooed transition to electric cars, which was supposed to culminate with a total ban on gasoline cars in 2035. ...

The transition was supposed to go on for 13 years after its announcement in 2022 but was abandoned only a year after its adoption. What happened?

Prodded by climate activists, the EU was pressured to ban fossil fuel vehicles and replace them with battery-powered vehicles. The problem is that such a transition is impossible:

Transitioning to electric passenger vehicles will increase electricity demand by 25%.

Transitioning to electric trucks will further raise electricity demand to a total of 40% increase.

EU is phasing out fossil fuel generation and replacing it with unreliable solar and wind generation - thus decreasing power availability instead of increasing it to meet greater demand.

As cars and especially trucks are charged at night, solar and wind power cannot contribute to charging.

Are electric cars more efficient?
Running a gasoline car involves:

Burning gas in the internal combustion engine and converting thermal energy to mechanical energy. That’s it.

Charging an electric car’s battery from the grid and driving the car involves:

Burning gas at the power station and converting thermal energy of gas to mechanical energy of the gas turbine. This is only moderately more efficient in a power station than gasoline cars.

Then, losses begin:

Converting the mechanical energy of the turbine into electrical energy in the generator involves generator losses

Converting medium voltage from the generator into high transmission voltage involves transformer losses

Transmitting the power along the high voltage lines involves transmission losses

Stepping down the voltage in several substations involves transformer losses again

In a home charging station, converting 220v power into DC for car charging again involves conversion losses

A chemical process in the battery being charged heats the battery, involving charging losses

Running the car’s electrical motors from the battery requires inverter losses to generate electricity for traction motors and motor losses.

Take a look at what happens when a driver needs heat in the cab:

Heating a gasoline car in winter involves redirecting waste heat (hot antifreeze) from the engine into the cab heater, thus not requiring additional fuel.

Heating an electric car requires a resistance heater or a heat pump, needing to eventually consume more energy from the grid - with all the above conversion losses included.

Which process (gasoline car vs. electric) is more efficient at converting fuel, burnt directly in the car engine or at distant power stations, into usable energy to propel a car traveling on a highway? The gas engines win outright. ...

The climate change field is full of crooks and is directed by those who recently gave us a non-working and dangerous Covid vaccine.

I do not believe them or their paid scientists any more than I believe the dishonest “Covid science.” ...
27   richwicks   2023 Mar 27, 8:55pm  

Patrick says


https://igorchudov.substack.com/p/europe-abandons-all-electric-car


Europe Abandons All-Electric Car Mandate
Stupidity of "switch to electric" while killing power generation

Igor Chudov
1 hr ago

France24 and the Wall Street Journal (paywall-free link) report that the EU abandoned its much-ballyhooed transition to electric cars, which was supposed to culminate with a total ban on gasoline cars in 2035. ...

The transition was supposed to go on for 13 years after its announcement in 2022 but was abandoned only a year after its adoption. What happened?

Prodded by climate activists, the EU was pressured to ban fossil fuel vehicles and replace them with battery-powered vehicles. The problem is that such a transition is impossible:

Transitioning to electric passenger vehicles will increase electricity d...



Hallelujah, they are finally seeing the light, although they've been covering their eyes for the last 10 years. Electric vehicles are a grift, a scam. Invest in a failed technology, pump it up through propaganda for years, sell, let the bagholders take a bath. Looks like it's bath time..
29   RWSGFY   2023 Mar 27, 10:45pm  

Patrick says

https://notthebee.com/article/one-tiny-little-detail-they-forgot-to-tell-you-about-those-electric-vehicles





That's why insurance for Model 3 is 2x of a similarly priced vehicle. At least it was for me when I priced it against a Jeep.
30   rocketjoe79   2023 Mar 28, 12:16pm  

It's 2x because there is still high demand for ALL Tesla Products.
https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-market-share-q1-2023-cox-automotive/
They made a price reduction recently to get M3 and MY below the Federal Rebate limit. Now is the time to buy. I've been saving about 2/3 of my gas costs using electric fuel. I'm in NorCal, and I pay the highest gas and electricity costs nationwide, I believe.
Also, I had a rear-ender and didn't have to replace my battery. It's the usual, nonsense hype. Also the hype about "You'll have to replace your battery and it'll cost you a fortune!!" is overblown.
https://www.recurrentauto.com/research/how-long-do-ev-batteries-last
31   HeadSet   2023 Mar 28, 2:36pm  

rocketjoe79 says

It's 2x because there is still high demand for ALL Tesla Products.

I can see why high demand would increase the price of the Tesla, but why would high demand double the insurance cost?
32   rocketjoe79   2023 Mar 28, 5:28pm  

HeadSet says

rocketjoe79 says


It's 2x because there is still high demand for ALL Tesla Products.

I can see why high demand would increase the price of the Tesla, but why would high demand double the insurance cost?

Insurance Companies have trouble evaluating Cost-of-repair for new tech vehicles. Also, you have very few Aftermarket parts available for Tesla. This is one of the reasons Tesla Insurance was started (along with making money, of course.) Tesla gets data on each collision, and they know the cost of repairs. This should drive down costs and allow them to make future vehicles safer, cheaper and quicker to repair.
35   Patrick   2023 Jul 5, 11:24am  




Could be fake, but funny anyway.
37   RWSGFY   2023 Jul 6, 8:43am  

Patrick says







Fat chance: if the popo didn't first witness the act of speeding and then didn't measure the speed using a certified device he can go and fly a kite, pound sand or fuck himself (his choice).

But Tesla will punish you for speeding by increasing your rate if you buy insurance from them.
38   HeadSet   2023 Jul 6, 8:46am  

Patrick says





More likely the car will not allow you to speed in the first place. But then again, tickets are a source of revenue.
39   HeadSet   2023 Jul 6, 8:48am  

RWSGFY says

Fat chance: if the popo didn't first witness the act of speeding and then didn't measure the speed using a certified device he can go and fly a kite, pound sand or fuck himself (his choice).

The precedence has already been set with red light cameras and speed cameras.
40   RWSGFY   2023 Jul 6, 9:43am  

HeadSet says

RWSGFY says


Fat chance: if the popo didn't first witness the act of speeding and then didn't measure the speed using a certified device he can go and fly a kite, pound sand or fuck himself (his choice).

The precedence has already been set with red light cameras and speed cameras.


Yes, it was: red light cameras have been deemed illegal and ordered to be removed in CA.

Comments 1 - 40 of 695       Last »     Search these comments

Please register to comment:

api   best comments   contact   latest images   memes   one year ago   random   suggestions