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Amazing High Tech Military can't find it's own Top Tech Jet on own Territory


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2023 Sep 18, 11:29am   5,744 views  76 comments

by AmericanKulak   ➕follow (7)   💰tip   ignore  

How does a plane with autopilot, advanced GPS features, IFF, etc. simply disappear off South Carolina and can't be found?



I could see if it was flying a few hundred feet off the ground under total Emmissions Control on a mission, but on a flight in the US?

Furthermore, there were TWO planes on the mission. The wingman didn't not the time and place of the bailout, and then they could calculate the trajectory of the plane from there?

More to this story than what we're being told.

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38   AmericanKulak   2023 Sep 19, 11:58am  

It crashed less than 100 miles from it's base in well populated east-coast CONUS and took 28 hours to find.
39   Ceffer   2023 Sep 19, 12:51pm  

Well, the F35 might already be obsolete in one way or another. Or, ceding it to the blackguards could be a spy vs. spy maneuver by filling it with spy shit and and false technology leads/ crypto softwares to make their imitations fall out of the sky with the push of a button. Or, just a payout from captured politicians so they can stay alive. By the time they finish analyzing the fucking thing and establishing industrialized production of the elements, the whole theater of war might have moved on.

The military knows instantaneously where this thing is and went, unless they put it into a huge faraday cage.
40   Ceffer   2023 Sep 19, 1:24pm  

Another twist from the twist mill:

42   Ceffer   2023 Sep 19, 4:07pm  

Are they sure that isn't an Apollo landing site on the moon?

https://t.me/SGTnewsNetwork/52877
44   komputodo   2023 Sep 19, 7:15pm  

I'll bet it crashed in a field and buried itself
46   NuttBoxer   2023 Sep 19, 8:18pm  

RWSGFY says

Complex tech does fail sometimes. Even simple tech does. Fucking flintlocks fail to fire now and then. You are in SW QA, aren't you? So you know how the sausage is made.


I just know that tech is routinely over-hyped, and government contracts produce some of the most half-assed equipment manufactured anywhere. I've never taken government contracts for moral reasons, but I've heard plenty from people who have.
48   RWSGFY   2023 Sep 19, 9:26pm  

NuttBoxer says

RWSGFY says


Complex tech does fail sometimes. Even simple tech does. Fucking flintlocks fail to fire now and then. You are in SW QA, aren't you? So you know how the sausage is made.


I just know that tech is routinely over-hyped, and government contracts produce some of the most half-assed equipment manufactured anywhere. I've never taken government contracts for moral reasons, but I've heard plenty from people who have.


Without government contracts there won't be any military equipment. Without military equipment there won't be military. You aren't proposing we go w/o military, are you?
49   AmericanKulak   2023 Sep 19, 10:13pm  

We go back to "Name the price per piece in lots of 100" and contractors build the prototype on their own dime.

No more cost-plus, it's been a disaster.
50   Ceffer   2023 Sep 19, 10:23pm  

It's probably in a Walmart warehouse somewhere waiting to be crated and shipped back to China.
51   Ceffer   2023 Sep 19, 11:05pm  

All we know about this missing aircraft is that everything is still up in the air.
52   apex   2023 Sep 20, 6:05am  

> All we know about this missing aircraft is that everything is still up in the air.

Except... um, you know... the aircraft.
53   NuttBoxer   2023 Sep 20, 8:08am  

RWSGFY says

Without government contracts there won't be any military equipment. Without military equipment there won't be military. You aren't proposing we go w/o military, are you?


Didn't need one when the country was founded. All citizens had free access to the latest guns and ammo back then.

Do you trust our government? Do you believe they have your best interests at heart? Asking because you seem to think you need them to protect you. Despite the fact that throughout government has always done the opposite.

For what we need I will refer you to the 2nd Amendment, specifically well regulated militias.
54   Patrick   2023 Sep 20, 10:34am  

https://www.coffeeandcovid.com/p/spoofed-wednesday-september-20-2023


ABC quoted one of its regular news contributors, retired Colonel Steve Ganyard, who was shocked that the military could somehow “lose” the plane for 28 hours. "Even though it's a stealth aircraft, losing a stealth aircraft is hard to understand. ... It does seem ridiculous that an aircraft this expensive, this sophisticated, it could just vanish," he said.

Yes. It does seem ridiculous. Ridiculous and indescribably shameful.

You might also muse about how it’s odd to lose any kind of aircraft only one mile from the airport. Plus, the plane basically continued on the same line after the pilot ejected:




Did they even try flying the flight path in a helicopter? It was only 80 miles away right along the flight path. It should have taken them only half an hour to find it.

To be clear, we don’t have any idea what caused the crash or why it took the military 28 hours to find the crash site. Yesterday I speculated about nefarious Chinese hackers, and some skeptical commenters thought the theory premature. But I wasn’t the only one wondering about that theory. The UK Daily Mail ran this story:




It wouldn’t be the first time the military got hacked this year. Remember Jack Texiera? The young part-time Texas national guard member and video game aficionado who supposedly hacked all our intelligence agencies and downloaded embarrassing Ukraine intel that showed Biden had been lying for a year?

Like a lost F35 fighter jet, Texiera completely vanished off the news radar in May. But I digress.

According to the Mail’s article, a four-year-old GAO report warned the $80 million F35’s systems “provided a back door for hackers.” POGO, a military watchdog agency, also released a report in 2019 showing that nearly every software-enabled weapon system they tested between 2012 and 2017 can be hacked - including the F-35. ...

As if that weren’t enough, also in 2019 the Pentagon itself confirmed the F35B — the same plane that just crashed in Charleston — has already been hacked by the Chinese.

As I understand it, somebody with a Chinese accent called the Pentagon saying they needed the F35 login password to update the antivirus software.
55   Ceffer   2023 Sep 20, 10:49am  

Patrick says

As I understand it, somebody with a Chinese accent called the Pentagon saying they needed the F35 login password to update the antivirus software.

Milley: "Oh, sure, I have it written on a scratch pad here somewhere, and it's also taped to my laptop. Here you go. Will that same Chinese tranny hooker be at the Watergate, tonight? It's my favorite."
56   AmericanKulak   2023 Sep 20, 5:29pm  

Bad weather? C'mon. This thing can fly way, way above any bad weather.



Xir or Woman pilot, STOL issues, or Hack? Only options IMHO.

Pilots don't touch the F-35 until they've had 1000+ hours in simulations, trainer aircraft, then simulations specific for the F-35 for a hundred or two hundred hours, before they're allowed to fly it in perfect visibility doing routine staight and level flights for scores of hours.

There's no way the Defense Department or Lockheed Lobbyist Paid DoD Rules would force an F-35 pilot to continue training in bad weather (in a populated area no less), lest it makes the aircraft look bad. I doubt the Pilot felt compelled by Rules to remain in a dangerous situation on a training flight.

All She/They/Them had to do was pull up and gain a few thousand feet in altitude, which anybody who spent hundreds of hours in a T-34 Mentor could easily do.

And why Eject instead of pulling up?
57   HeadSet   2023 Sep 20, 5:57pm  

AmericanKulak says


Bad weather? C'mon. This thing can fly way, way above any bad weather.

And through any bad weather. All military warplanes are seriously IFR equipped and max use is made of IFR on every flight regardless of weather conditions. The only rule in the Air Force was never to penetrate a thunderstorm in peacetime. Nobody bails out because the weather got bad. I will comment on "flying above any bad weather," though. Thunderstorms in the Midwest top often out above 50,000 ft, so no flying above those.
58   Ceffer   2023 Sep 20, 7:28pm  

Maybe the tranny pilot stopped to ask for directions, and went into the alleged death spiral. It broke a nail ejecting.
60   Misc   2023 Sep 20, 8:09pm  

Damn climate change did it.
61   ForcedTQ   2023 Sep 20, 11:22pm  

HeadSet says

AmericanKulak says



Bad weather? C'mon. This thing can fly way, way above any bad weather.

And through any bad weather. All military warplanes are seriously IFR equipped and max use is made of IFR on every flight regardless of weather conditions. The only rule in the Air Force was never to penetrate a thunderstorm in peacetime. Nobody bails out because the weather got bad. I will comment on "flying above any bad weather," though. Thunderstorms in the Midwest top often out above 50,000 ft, so no flying above those.


Unless you’re a U2 pilot…
62   FortwayeAsFuckJoeBiden   2023 Sep 20, 11:59pm  

Trollhole says

Ceffer says




https://t.me/drue86/44761


I thought they were $80 million


worst part is they won’t tell us why this happened.
63   just_passing_through   2023 Sep 21, 7:36am  

AmericanKulak says

All She/They/Them had to do was pull up and gain a few thousand feet in altitude, which anybody who spent hundreds of hours in a T-34 Mentor could easily do.


Modern computer controlled (fly by wire I think it's called) airplanes that may not work. So you pull up and the computer says: No

Then what?

My uncle was a top gun aggressor trainer pilot and told me a story about how he was doing some sort of maneuver when his plane started falling out of the sky in a stall sort of situation. With older planes he'd flown in the past he could get out of it but his F15 wouldn't do what he was telling it to.

He kept falling and falling the suddenly a big green arrow appeared on the screen pointing left so he pulled left and suddenly was flying again.
64   just_passing_through   2023 Sep 21, 7:43am  

Also interestingly I have a cousin who is a United pilot who told me something to the effect that his routes are nearly completely automated these days. He takes over the controls for the last few seconds landing and similar for take off, the rest, computer controlled.

When he's at cruising altitude if he ever has to switch off auto pilot he can't, "fly the plane as smoothly as auto pilot does". Apparently the computer makes many micro adjustments to provide a smooth ride so quickly and constantly that a human can't do it.
65   HeadSet   2023 Sep 21, 2:20pm  

just_passing_through says

Modern computer controlled (fly by wire I think it's called)

Fighter planes as long ago as the F4 Phantom require computer aided flying. The reason is that the center of gravity is placed right at the center of lift, which makes the aircraft very maneuverable but also too unstable to be mechanically flown. Airbus introduced the concept of center of lift at center of gravity to the A300 series because that configuration also increases efficiency and fuel milage. If the fly by wire goes out, the A300 series cannot be mechanically flown. It does have a triple redundant system, though. For planes that are mechanically flown, the center of lift is always aft of the center of gravity, for stability reasons. That includes military planes like the KC-135 and C-141, and even Cessnas. Even a private pilot can tell you about the weight and balance calculations he must do if he wants to load a lot of baggage in the aft cargo section.
66   just_passing_through   2023 Sep 21, 7:56pm  

My cousin and uncle at United fly Boeings. My dad flew F100s around the time of F4s but I don't think they were fly by wire. Others in the family C5s, C141s, and warthogs, WWII bombers I that don't recall in the Pacific. The military pilots I guess. Some other pilots in the family too. Whenever I'm around a bunch of them I don't know half of what they're talking about.
67   HeadSet   2023 Sep 22, 5:54am  

just_passing_through says

My dad flew F100s around the time of F4s but I don't think they were fly by wire.

The F4 was computer aided, not fly by wire. Same with the same era F-106. Moving the stick did not directly move flight control surfaces. The plane's electronic system took the pilot's input and then moved the flight control accordingly. The F-100 was sill old school direct linkage. "Fly by wire" is more advanced than the old computer systems and I think fly by wire debuted with the F-16.
68   AmericanKulak   2023 Sep 22, 8:21am  

just_passing_through says

Modern computer controlled (fly by wire I think it's called) airplanes that may not work. So you pull up and the computer says: No

Then what?

Yep. Hack or shit software. The latter has been a perpetual problem with the F-35
69   stereotomy   2023 Sep 22, 8:48am  

HeadSet says


Fighter planes as long ago as the F4 Phantom require computer aided flying. The reason is that the center of gravity is placed right at the center of lift, which makes the aircraft very maneuverable but also too unstable to be mechanically flown. Airbus introduced the concept of center of lift at center of gravity to the A300 series because that configuration also increases efficiency and fuel milage. If the fly by wire goes out, the A300 series cannot be mechanically flown. It does have a triple redundant system, though. For planes that are mechanically flown, the center of lift is always aft of the center of gravity, for stability reasons. That includes military planes like the KC-135 and C-141, and even Cessnas. Even a private pilot can tell you about the weight and balance calculations he must do if he wants to load a lot of baggage in the aft cargo section.

I fly higher power rockets as a hobby, and this applies to rockets as well. Any rocket that has its center of pressure (the centroid of aerodynamic forces acting on the rocket) too close or forward of the center of mass will be completely unstable and pinwheel, possibly impaling bystanders. For flight safety, all rockets must have their centers of mass at least one caliber (main tube thickness) forward from the center of pressure; preferably it's at least 2 calibers.

I see this all the time with high power certification flights - the "kids" built a rocket that is barely stable, so until the airspeed builds enough to generate stabilizing drag, the rocket wiggles or fishtails off the pad.
70   Ceffer   2023 Sep 22, 1:35pm  

Another theory. At least it's not Global Warming. Trump's military countering the powdered, rouged, lipsticked, bewigged armchair Pentagon MIC/DARPA generals and their CFR Illuminati plots? https://en.as.com/en/2022/03/13/latest_news/1647181885_381700.html

https://t.me/drue86/44812


71   Ceffer   2023 Sep 23, 12:38am  

So boring hanging around a debris field when there is no debris to pick up.
72   Ceffer   2023 Sep 24, 12:08am  

This would be funny if true, but sounds like just another lame spin attempt to justify the violation of the Second Amendment to remove firearms from the public. Never let a good propaganda opportunity pass you by, especially when you otherwise look like incompetent dolts. Was this AI spin as well? AI wouldn't have the value judgment to know it was shooting itself in the microchips.
Ever seen a jet fly by at an air show? Think small arms fire has a gasp in hell of hitting it? It would have to be stock still on the ground to get plinked like an old country road stop sign.

73   HeadSet   2023 Sep 24, 9:32am  

Ceffer says

This would be funny if true, but sounds like just another lame spin attempt to justify the violation of the Second Amendment to remove firearms from the public. Never let a good propaganda opportunity pass you by, especially when you otherwise look like incompetent dolts. Was this AI spin as well? AI wouldn't have the value judgment to know it was shooting itself in the microchips.



Quite the marksman to hit a fast-moving target 2500 feet away. Lead the target and account for droppage. That would be hard to do even with tracer fire.
74   NuttBoxer   2023 Sep 26, 7:00am  

Ceffer says

but sounds like just another lame spin attempt to justify the violation of the Second Amendment to remove firearms from the public.


If my best plane gets shot down by small arms, I say I lost it. I don't say what really happened because I don't people knowing they can beat us. This would be a terrible propaganda idea.
75   NuttBoxer   2023 Sep 26, 7:03am  

HeadSet says

Quite the marksman to hit a fast-moving target 2500 feet away.


According to this guy it was hovering, and there was more than one shot.
76   RWSGFY   2023 Sep 26, 9:18am  

HeadSet says


Ceffer says


This would be funny if true, but sounds like just another lame spin attempt to justify the violation of the Second Amendment to remove firearms from the public. Never let a good propaganda opportunity pass you by, especially when you otherwise look like incompetent dolts. Was this AI spin as well? AI wouldn't have the value judgment to know it was shooting itself in the microchips.



Quite the marksman to hit a fast-moving target 2500 feet away. Lead the target and account for droppage. That would be hard to do even with tracer fire.



The BS is so obvious you shouldn't have dignified it with a serious answer. Just laugh and point your finger as if somebody told you there are 47 genders. It's the same level of idiocy, really.

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