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My impressions of Seattle

By Goran_K follow Goran_K   2019 Apr 25, 6:22pm 938 views   21 comments   watch   nsfw   quote   share    




My tiny little consulting company (comprised of me, my wife, and 4 sub-contractors) got a new state contract with Washington state. Met with my new government clients over 2 days and did 2 more days of being a tourist (because why not, it’s a business expense).

Anyway, few things I noticed.

- Seattle reminds me of San Francisco right before the tech boom exploded in the early 2000s. Think San Francisco of the mid-late 90s. It’s crowded but not overwhelmingly so, it’s not as smelly as SF, and the homeless while present are not quite at the levels of S.F. city center yet.

- The entire Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond area is beautiful. Love the neighborhoods, it’s like Marin County but somewhat less lefty and douchey. I could see why techies flock to this area. Good schools, clean steeets, and a plethora of tech firms that are constantly hiring. I even saw people wearing MAGA hats at Mod Pizza. Kinda crazy.

- weather is gloomy but I don’t hate it. I know people say the Pacific Northwest is constantly dreary but I feel if you can handle San Francisco, then Seattle is pretty similar. We did get some isolated sun here and there. I hear it’s better during the Summer. Air is way cleaner than the S.F. Bay Area, at least it smells that way.

- Pikes market area is awesome. Wish I had a farmers market type area of this size and variety near me.

I don’t know how long Washington will stay purple-ish or when it will turn Taxifornia and go full blue, but right now it seems like a good pick if i was looking for tech work and a lower tax burden than the S.F. Bay Area (no income tax in Washington).
1   Rin   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 25, 6:46pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Goran_K says
My tiny little consulting company (comprised of me, my wife, and 4 sub-contractors) got a new state contract with Washington state. Met with my new government clients over 2 days and did 2 more days of being a tourist (because why not, it’s a business expense).


Goran, business is business. If your business is local, i.e. govt of WA, then you have to make the best of the place you're at, even if it's got a lot of overcast and seasonal rain. Sure, I was lucky in the sense that in some strange way, I was never too far from my hometown of Boston for too long, but that's not the case for everyone else.

Good luck and try to make it a second home, even if it never becomes your primary one.

And SF sucks.
2   willywonka   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 25, 7:15pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

You can get to good skiing quicker from Seattle (Stevens, Crystal) than you can from SF to Tahoe by a long shot. Also, great hiking in the Cascades also relatively close, and 90 east is a greenbelt area. But commuting from the Eastside to Seattle is a beast, and they keep building more homes, but not roads. Seattle today is not at all like Seattle in the '90's - less crowded then, more affordable, and so more normal folks in the city and grunge! But everything is relative. Diversified economy - Microsoft, Costco, Travelocity, Boeing, Amazon. It does rain all the time, but not a lot. The Northeast gets more total rainfall. And August and September can be splendid with no rain at all. The new homes are being built with A/C, and the long time locals claim the weather is getting warmer. If so, Walla Walla is the new Napa. And checkout Woodinville - loaded with wineries including Chateau St. Michelle where you can see some decent summer concerts.
3   socal2   ignore (2)   2019 Apr 25, 7:16pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I travel to Seattle frequently for work. It is absolutely beautiful when the sun is out and seeing Mt. Rainier tower over the horizon is amazing. But the rain really sucks and it is a very long and dark winter period.

Seattle's City Council makes the nuts in Sacramento look halfway sane and Seattle is rapidly following other Liberal Progressive failures down the tubes.

I'll take San Diego any day of the week and twice on Sundays compared to San Francisco or Seattle.

Can't get the Youtube link to work but check out the recent "Seattle is Dying" news documentary KOMO News put out last month. It is very scathing towards Seattle's government and politicians. Like San Francisco, Seattle has a drug problem, not a homeless problem.

4   Ceffer   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 25, 8:23pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Sounds like Seattle doesn't have enough Californians yet. That'll fix 'em!

"Love the neighborhoods, it’s like Marin County but somewhat less lefty and douchey." Heh, Heh!
5   BayArea   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 25, 9:30pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Goran, Seattle is no Gardnerville
6   just_dregalicious   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 25, 10:11pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

socal2 says
I'll take San Diego any day of the week


Dude! Shush!
7   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 12:41am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Going in early September for strictly leisure/tourism. Love coastal areas, but for the first time in a while, I'm really not looking forward to a trip. I'll keep an open mind though. Any specific areas an hour or two drive out the city that are must see? We'll be downtown for 2-3 days and the other 5 or so we can do whatever outside of Seattle, but don't really want to drive a ton.

+10 on San Diego as well.
8   kt1652   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 26, 12:53am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Seattle is my girl friend I loved, but I can't live with her for 7 moody, depressed dark months of the year.
9   Ceffer   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 1:40am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I talked with a professional whose wife was from SoCal. He had a good opportunity and moved to Seattle. After two years, she said if he didn't move back to more sun and less overcast/rain, she would have to leave him because she was too depressed up there. She did OK in SoCal.

I also talked with a shrink who said that he had clients who lived in NoCal coast who HAD to leave for two months in the winter due to mood disturbances. However, not everybody has these, it is dependent on the individual.

My wife has a cousin who lives on one of the islands around Seattle, and he and his wife love it and have never had a problem with the climate.
10   WookieMan   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 2:21am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Ceffer says
I also talked with a shrink who said that he had clients who lived in NoCal coast who HAD to leave for two months in the winter due to mood disturbances


Yeah, that's a thing for sure. Costa Rica 1 time and Mexico 3 times since November. Not a brag, I just can't fucking stand IL winters. Hell the IL winters aren't even good enough, went to Montana and did some boarding at Big Sky and Bridger last month. I'm an IL unicorn though. Super low cost of living for IL and high(ish) income compared to the coasts so I'm happy enough here.

I'm a total warm weather and sun guy though. I suppose that's why I'm not looking forward to Seattle, though like others have said, August/Sept. shouldn't be too bad.

During that MT trip I actually flew into Spokane, WA and caught a show in Sandpoint, ID. Hidden gem (to me at least). That area is amazing and seems so chill (non-touristy, etc though maybe it is to locals). That said, if anyone has a pull (neighbor, friend, relative) at Southwest, tell them to get a route to Bozeman, MT though. Couldn't live there year round, but amazing area to visit almost year round. It's already hipster and kind of booming, but fun place either way. Enough land to get away from the hipster/yuppie/gay types in Bozeman/Belgrade proper. Or go over the pass to Livingston and be a true first wave hipster.
11   BayArea   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 26, 3:57am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Ceffer says
I talked with a professional whose wife was from SoCal. He had a good opportunity and moved to Seattle. After two years, she said if he didn't move back to more sun and less overcast/rain, she would have to leave him because she was too depressed up there. She did OK in SoCal.

I also talked with a shrink who said that he had clients who lived in NoCal coast who HAD to leave for two months in the winter due to mood disturbances. However, not everybody has these, it is dependent on the individual.

My wife has a cousin who lives on one of the islands around Seattle, and he and his wife love it and have never had a problem with the climate.


My how comfortable we’ve gotten as a society when a few clouds can launch us into depression, lol...
12   joshuatrio   ignore (0)   2019 Apr 26, 4:15am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Goran_K says
My tiny little consulting company (comprised of me, my wife, and 4 sub-contractors) got a new state contract with Washington state.


Congrats on the contract!
13   willywonka   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 4:37am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
pecific areas an hour or two drive out the city that are must see?
Rent a kayak and tour the Sound, Woodinville for all the wineries, Gasworks park, Sequim for the lavender, La Conner - kicked back town with good restaurants and galleries, Leavenworth for a somewhat cheesy recreation of a Bavarian town, take a ferry ride to one of the islands, Orcas if you can swing it, but Poulsbo for sure. Great little downtown with lots fo shops, galleries, bars and restaurants. Head east on 90 and hike. Most tourists choose Mt. Si, but for a real heart attack to the hall of the mountain kings, try the Ira Spring trail. But only if you and your group are in good shape. And there is always Snoqualmie Falls for an easier view of nature.
14   CBOEtrader   ignore (7)   2019 Apr 26, 5:39am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

just_dregalicious says
Sure, I was lucky in the sense that in some strange way, I was never too far from my hometown of Boston for too long, but that's not the case for everyone else.


I spent two summers in college living in UCLA frat houses. San Diego, IMO, is the best US west coast city. Or at least it was for broke college kids looking for perfect 10 coeds to chase circa 1999. Although, LA was way too easy as well. I went to ultra conservative Washington and Lee University, where the girls were neither hot nor slutty, but would grow up to have good jobs if that gets you off (gross).

Today. I'm looking to escape to Puerto Rico! ACT 22 = no commissions ftw!
15   Goran_K   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 5:49am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Rin says
Goran_K says
My tiny little consulting company (comprised of me, my wife, and 4 sub-contractors) got a new state contract with Washington state. Met with my new government clients over 2 days and did 2 more days of being a tourist (because why not, it’s a business expense).


Goran, business is business. If your business is local, i.e. govt of WA, then you have to make the best of the place you're at, even if it's got a lot of overcast and seasonal rain. Sure, I was lucky in the sense that in some strange way, I was never too far from my hometown of Boston for too long, but that's not the case for everyone else.

Good luck and try to make it a second home, even if it never becomes your primary one.

And SF sucks.


I’ll be traveling there a lot more now but not sure it would be worth buying another home. The places I would consider living are kind of pricey too.
16   clambo   ignore (5)   2019 Apr 26, 8:13am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Washington and Seattle are great except in the winter time.

I knew a guy who was well set up on Bainbridge Island and he would bail out to Baja Sur MX in the winter because he liked the sun not the rain and darkness. He could do it because he was retired.

I think life's too short to be not seeing sunshine frequently so I would visit up there in the nice months, and stay away in the winter.
17   Goran_K   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 26, 8:25am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

WookieMan says
Going in early September for strictly leisure/tourism. Love coastal areas, but for the first time in a while, I'm really not looking forward to a trip. I'll keep an open mind though. Any specific areas an hour or two drive out the city that are must see? We'll be downtown for 2-3 days and the other 5 or so we can do whatever outside of Seattle, but don't really want to drive a ton.

+10 on San Diego as well.


I don't know how you like to enjoy an area, I might be a little different/off compared to most but I barely spend time at the tourist areas. I did spend time at Pike's place, and I did spend time in Downtown, but I went to Yelp and searched for the best food places outside of Seattle. I find this great eatery in Bellevue that had a live music performance one of the nights I was there. Had a blast, chatted with some locals, and found out in the flesh that Seattle isn't 100% full of lefties. I don't usually talk politics normally in conversation, but when it came up, the couple I was talking with said basically outside of Seattle metro, a lot of the state is fairly purple. Wouldn't know that simply based on census data or surveys.

I did take a water taxi to get to West Seattle, and it was worth it for $3.75 I believe. The views of the city from the water are awesome. I'll check my camera to see if I have a pic.
18   socal2   ignore (2)   2019 Apr 26, 9:59am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Ceffer says
I talked with a professional whose wife was from SoCal. He had a good opportunity and moved to Seattle. After two years, she said if he didn't move back to more sun and less overcast/rain, she would have to leave him because she was too depressed up there. She did OK in SoCal.


Even when it is not raining, it is gloomy and dark. I think sundown is around 4:30 during December/January. Seattle doesn't get that much more rain than places back East and the Midwest, the problem is that it just pisses and drizzles down for days and days. Most other places in the country will see a rain front move through and get a few days of sun in between storms. Seattle just stays socked in for weeks and months.

Right now I am trying to convince one of my guys working in Seattle to relocate to the Bay Area. It is a really tough sell with the cost of living in California including Income Tax. His wife just moved to Seattle from Malaysia and is apparently over the rain and pushing him to move south.
19   kt1652   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 26, 10:11am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

BayArea says
Ceffer says
I talked with a professional whose wife was from SoCal. He had a good opportunity and moved to Seattle. After two years, she said if he didn't move back to more sun and less overcast/rain, she would have to leave him because she was too depressed up there. She did OK in SoCal.

I also talked with a shrink who said that he had clients who lived in NoCal coast who HAD to leave for two months in the winter due to mood disturbances. However, not everybody has these, it is dependent on the individual.

My wife has a cousin who lives on one of the islands around Seattle, and he and his wife love it and have never had a problem with the climate.


My how comfortable we’ve gotten as a society when a few clouds can launch us into depression, lol...

'Will Norway Ever Beat the Winter Blues?
Scandinavia uses giant mirrors, light-therapy clinics, and even positive thinking to overcome seasonal depression, but the disorder remains mysterious.'

Sunlight has a huge impact on people's mood.
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/03/seasonal-affective-disorder-mosaic/519495/
For many of us, we have a choice where we live and where we travel for leisure.
Yes, one can hike, run, bike, kayak, picnic, garden with a raincoat, but I enjoy these activities more in shorts and t-shirt.
Sure I can live in Winnipeg, but why?
It all comes down to tradeoffs.
20   socal2   ignore (2)   2019 Apr 26, 10:38am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

kt1652 says
Sunlight has a huge impact on people's mood.


Yep - my wife would divorce me if I made her move somewhere wet, cold and dark. Even if they doubled my salary and I could afford to live in a huge house with lots of land, what's the point if I am stuck inside with shitty weather 6-8 months of the year?

We used to live a few blocks from the beach in a little crap-shack rental in Pacific Beach and would get depressed in May/June with all of the marine layer fog (May-Gray, June-Gloom). Now that we live in Carlsbad about 4 miles from the coast and the coastal fog burns off quicker and we get much more sunshine than we did right on the beach. I am surprised at how much of a difference it makes even in always sunny San Diego.

Don't visit San Diego in May/June if you are looking for sunny beach weather.
21   porkchopexpress   ignore (0)   2019 Apr 27, 10:47am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I lived in Seattle for 6 years. The 7-8 months of dark, dreary, cold, damp, drizzly hell wears on you like Chinese water torture. You need at least 3 full winters there before you know you can handle it. The first and second winters are still in the honeymoon phase. It drove me fucking crazy, but it doesn't seem to bother other people. If you live in a dry climate (CA, AZ, NV, UT, etc.) and think you'll love Seattle because you like the rain, you have no idea what you're talking about. The only way to know is to live there for an extended period of time.

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