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San Francisco's slide into hell under extreme leftism


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2021 Apr 15, 9:51pm   110,121 views  933 comments

by Patrick   ➕follow (55)   💰tip   ignore  

https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2021/04/19/chesa-boudins-dangerous-san-francisco/

‘Hey, where are you?” Hannah Ege texted her husband, Sheria Musyoka. He’d left on a morning jog and had been gone for an hour and a half. Hannah was home, taking care of their three-year-old son. She began to freak out. She called and texted and called again. He never answered.

Speeding and drunk — at just shy of eight in the morning — Jerry Lyons barreled through a red light at an intersection in a stolen Ford Explorer. Lyons struck and killed Musyoka, a 26-year-old Dartmouth grad who had moved to San Francisco only ten days earlier with his wife and their son. After clipping Musyoka, Lyons collided with another car, causing an eight-car pileup that sent several other people to the hospital.

The San Francisco police arrested Lyons on multiple charges that morning in February, but this was not the first time he’d been arrested for drunk driving in a stolen car. On December 3, he had been arrested for driving under the influence, driving a stolen vehicle, and driving without a license. Before that, he’d been released from prison after serving time for a grand-theft conviction; in fact, Lyons had been arrested at least seven times in the Bay Area since his release from prison, and his rap sheet goes back a decade. Still, San Francisco’s district attorney, Chesa Boudin, delayed pressing charges against Lyons until a toxicology report confirmed that he had been inebriated, which, more than a month and a half later in January, it did. Lyons then had 14 days to turn himself in to the DA’s office. On the 13th day, he killed Musyoka. While COVID-era difficulties might have accounted for the medical examiner’s slow speed in returning test results, a different DA could have chosen to move forward sooner — taking necessary precautions — and charged Lyons with a DUI based on observable factors alone, such as the results of Lyons’s field sobriety test, his erratic driving in a stolen vehicle, and close scrutiny of his behavior.

Hannah Ege expressed her grief and pain to a local TV news station, railing at the district attorney’s reluctance to lock up repeat offenders. Whom does she blame for her husband’s death? “The DA,” she said. “This freak accident was no freak accident. It was someone who was out in the public who should not have been out in public.”

The Lyons mayhem is not an isolated case in the city by the bay. On New Year’s Eve, a parolee on the run from a robbery — also in a stolen car — sped through a red light, striking and killing two women, 60-year-old Elizabeth Platt and 27-year-old Hanako Abe, who were in the crosswalk. The driver, Troy McAlister, had been released twice by the district attorney in the previous year: the first time because Boudin refuses to pursue three-strike cases, of which McAlister’s was one; the second — as recently as December 20, when the SFPD arrested McAlister for driving a stolen car — because Boudin kicked the case to the state parole officers, who did nothing.

Welcome to San Francisco’s latest idiocy, a new experiment in governance where everything is allowed but nothing is permitted. A paradox, you might say, but take a walk down Market Street, down that great avenue in a great city in a great nation, and note the desolation of the empty streets, the used needles tossed on the sidewalks, and the boarded-up windows on storefronts. Consider that, at various unpredictable times in the last year, it has been illegal — for the sake of public safety during COVID — to run a mom-and-pop corner shop or to serve food at sidewalk cafés. Reflect for a moment that, since time immemorial, it has been illegal to build any new housing, because of the most onerous and confusing zoning laws in the known universe. Mark Zuckerberg can apparently influence national elections by tweaking algorithms, but he is powerless before the planning commission when it comes to building apartments for his employees. The city has banned plastic straws, plastic bags, and McDonald’s Happy Meals with toys. And yet, all the while, drug dealers sell their wares — COVID or no COVID — openly and freely at all hours of the day and night, users shoot up or pop fentanyl in public and defecate on the street, robbers pillage cars and homes with the ease of Visigoth raiders, and the district attorney frees repeat offenders who go on to sow disorder, pain, devastation, and grief. A profound melancholy hangs in the air of this city, punctuated only by the shrieks of a junkie dreaming of demons or by the rat-tat-tat-bam of the occasional firework. (Or was that a gun?) ...

How did it come to this? On January 8, 2020, Mayor London Breed swore in Chesa Boudin as the new district attorney of San Francisco in front of a packed house at the Herbst Theater. Boudin won the election by a nose in a runoff, with oily promises to feel the pain of all parties to a crime, both victims and perpetrators. He made pledges to enact “restorative justice” and prison reform through “decarceration.” U.S. Supreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor recorded a congratulatory video message, which was played at the swearing-in ceremony for Boudin and the crowd. “Chesa, you have undertaken a remarkable challenge today,” the justice said. “The hope you reflect is a great beacon to many.”

The task before Boudin was already monumental. Before he assumed his office, San Francisco ranked No. 1 in the nation in property crime. On average, thieves broke 60 car windows per day, with impunity. In 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, a reform measure that reduced many felonies to ticketed misdemeanors, such as theft of less than $950 and hard-drug possession. There were more drug addicts on the streets than there were students in the schools. Tent encampments of homeless people had sprouted in every nook and alley and under every highway overpass. Commuters faced a daily gauntlet in the form of an appalling humanitarian crisis in the streets.

But Boudin immediately refused to take any responsibility for these issues. Among his first acts was to fire seven veteran prosecutors who were not on board with his radical views. (Over 30 prosecutors have left during his tenure because they don’t want to work for him.) Next, Boudin abolished the cash-bail system, so offenders are able to walk free after arrest. He rarely brings a case to trial: Out of the 6,333 cases to land on his desk since taking office, he has gone to trial only 23 times. This is one-tenth the rate of his predecessor, George Gascón, who was hardly tough on crime. Since the killing of George Floyd, there has been a shortage of cops, as officers retire in record numbers. San Francisco has also moved to defund the police, with plans to shift $120 million in law-enforcement funding to restorative-justice programs, housing support, and a guaranteed-income pilot, among other ideas.

To where does Boudin’s “great beacon” point? Over the last year, there have been more deaths from drug overdoses in San Francisco than from COVID-19. Walgreens has closed ten of its drugstores in the city because its shelves were being pillaged freely by shoplifters. According to SFPD’s CompStat, compared with last year, arson has increased 52 percent, motor-vehicle theft is up 21 percent, and burglaries have seen a 59 percent increase. One largely Asian neighborhood, the Richmond district, has reported a 342 percent spike in burglaries this year compared with last. Admittedly, some numbers are down, such as those for larceny and robbery. But police attribute these declines to the pandemic, since there are fewer opportunities for would-be criminals to commit such crimes as people shelter in place. One neighborhood association sent a letter in February to Boudin and Mayor Breed, begging them to restore public safety. The association also posted it on the Internet. “Our neighborhood can’t wait another day,” they wrote. “Our homes are repeatedly broken into and robbed. Our merchants suffer unsustainable losses from theft and smashed windows. Employees are threatened with guns. Residents are robbed at gunpoint on our own streets. The sound of gunshots is no longer unusual.” ...

Now, what rough beast slouches its way towards San Francisco? With a district attorney who won’t prosecute crimes, how long will it be until an anxious Google engineer defends himself from being harassed by a madman? Will envious arsonists light the Salesforce Tower on fire as a jacked-up mob courses through the streets burning and looting the Painted Ladies?

A desperate sun struggles through the fog. There may be one ray of hope. The city has recently approved the effort to recall Chesa Boudin from office. Locals could begin downloading signature-gathering petitions on March 12. If 10 percent of registered voters sign the petition, all voters may get the chance to vote the bum out. But even if they do, it will remain tragic for Musyoka, Platt, Abe, and others like them that the day did not come soon enough.


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884   Ceffer   2024 Jan 10, 2:05pm  

It's like William Burroughs 'Cities of the Red Night', with the gibbering hyperactive escaped asylum mates lunging into the cities and parks, the Kommie Latahs and dervishes parroting and twirling in their demented mantras.
885   Patrick   2024 Jan 11, 7:16pm  

https://notthebee.com/article/this-is-a-real-video-from-a-real-san-fran-city-board-meeting-


I thought it was a skit but turns out this was a real San Francisco board meeting


886   Patrick   2024 Jan 17, 1:28am  

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12971731/San-francisco-downtown-streets-store-closures.html


A journalist has shared alarming images of a once-prominent street that's been rocked by store closures in San Francisco.

One snap, taken in the heart of the city's famed shopping district, shows tourists wandering down a gutted Powell Street.

But instead of being graced with an array of shops, cafés, bars, and restaurants, the party is seen encountering countless shuttered storefronts.

More shots from Erica Sandberg show more of the same, and how the thoroughfare that runs adjacent to the city's Downtown, all the way from Market to Fisherman's Wharf, has become a shell of its former self.
887   Patrick   2024 Jan 18, 12:41pm  

https://sfstandard.com/2024/01/17/san-francisco-budget-deficit-1-4-billion-cuts-london-breed/


San Francisco in a ‘Tough Spot’ as $1.4B Budget Deficit Looms
888   Ceffer   2024 Jan 18, 12:57pm  

Patrick says

San Francisco in a ‘Tough Spot’ as $1.4B Budget Deficit Looms

Just less money to run the city. Graft from the Golden Goose comes first. Soros Fecal Impactions dancing on the bones of the city. Why do you think they appointed the pidgins in the first place?
889   Eric Holder   2024 Jan 18, 1:54pm  

Patrick says

https://sfstandard.com/2024/01/17/san-francisco-budget-deficit-1-4-billion-cuts-london-breed/



San Francisco in a ‘Tough Spot’ as $1.4B Budget Deficit Looms



Noooooooo!
890   AD   2024 Jan 18, 3:52pm  

raise taxes or austerity
891   RWSGFY   2024 Jan 18, 6:28pm  

ad says

raise taxes or austerity


Racist!
892   Eman   2024 Jan 18, 6:46pm  

ad says

raise taxes or austerity

There should be a meme for this

Austerity = Don’t want to listen to it
Raise taxes = smile and approve
893   Misc   2024 Jan 18, 10:49pm  

ad says

raise taxes or austerity


... or raid the pension funds by putting Municipal IOUs into it while selling off anything of value.
894   HeadSet   2024 Jan 19, 9:25am  

Misc says

ad says


raise taxes or austerity


... or raid the pension funds by putting Municipal IOUs into it while selling off anything of value.

Best choice.
895   AD   2024 Jan 22, 12:16am  

.

Eugene, Oregon is number one for homeless population as a percentage of per capita

Seattle is 5, San Jose is 4, NYC is 3 and Los Angeles is 2 ...

San Fran is ranked 8 ... I don't see Portland in the top 25, which makes me a little suspicious of the article

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/25-us-cities-highest-homeless-153443475.html

.
896   Ceffer   2024 Jan 22, 2:37am  

And how exactly does one go about counting homeless people? All the estimates are underestimates. The Politburo of the Great Socialist Paradise doesn't like to look too bad.
898   RC2006   2024 Jan 22, 8:15am  

Bay area is so bad I move there for any price. Weather is the only reason it hasn't turned into a Detroit.
899   AD   2024 Jan 22, 8:33am  

RC2006 says

Bay area is so bad I move there for any price. Weather is the only reason it hasn't turned into a Detroit.


It has nice geography also, and quite a bit of cultural activities. Good place to go sailing and boating as well as fishing.

But I agree with you as far as being a Democrat shithole.

.
900   AD   2024 Jan 22, 8:40am  

UkraineIsFucked says

https://wolfstreet.com/2024/01/21/status-of-the-housing-bust-in-san-francisco-lowest-price-for-any-december-since-2017-2019-silicon-valley-and-the-bay-area/


Yeah I'm glad Wolfman at WolfStreet is following one of the most inflated housing markets. Prices there would need to drop another 50% (as they already dropped about 25% from peak) in order for them to be affordable.

All the inflated metro areas will be the first to correct and will correct very significantly (i.e., +33% decrease from peak). Perhaps other areas like the Florida panhandle will not correct as much if the 30 year mortgage rate steadies no more than 5.5% in 2024 and 2025.

I figure prices would need to drop 25% in the Florida panhandle based on a 30 year mortgage rate (ie., 10% price drop for every 1% increase in 30 year rate) if the 30 year rate is at 5.5%.

This assumes the most extreme case that peak prices were set in early 2022 with locked-in 30 year mortgage rate of 3%.

However, income increased at least 4% annually 2022 and 2023 and likely in 2024.

So deduct (1.04^3 -1) x 100% or 12.5% from 25%, which is 12.5%. Prices should drop about 12.5% for the Florida panhandle.

.
901   Patrick   2024 Jan 24, 1:16pm  




All that money is paid to grifters for their political support, and to expand the homeless population to justify yet further increased funding.
902   Ceffer   2024 Jan 24, 1:42pm  

Patrick says

All that money is paid to grifters for their political support, and to expand the homeless population to justify yet further increased funding.

Of course. It's a circle jerk laundering racket disguising, as usual, the Satanic Inversion fake altruism.
903   Patrick   2024 Jan 26, 7:03pm  

https://sfstandard.com/2023/06/12/heres-how-long-it-took-to-buy-locked-up-basic-items-in-san-francisco-stores/


Here’s How Long It Took To Buy Locked Up Basic Items in San Francisco Stores ...

Aisle 10 inside the Safeway at Market and Church streets is lined with gleaming, locked acrylic cases stocked with everything from toothpaste and hand soap to sunscreen and K-Y Jelly.

But you can’t just go up to the shelf and grab what you want; you need to press a button to summon an associate to unlock the case. What’s more, the employee won’t even give the item to you. The staffer must put it in a basket and bring it to the register, lest you waltz out the door without paying.

Before I could press said button, a local resident named Danielle did. She and I waited three minutes and 31 seconds for our toothpaste, at which point a worker came over and hurriedly pulled two tubes of Crest off the shelf, put them in a shopping basket and walked away. ...

Two minutes and 34 seconds elapsed before a worker retrieved a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red for me. ...
904   Misc   2024 Jan 26, 7:09pm  

Wonder how long it takes a group of Obama's sons to completely take everything from a store without those lock up policies.

---- I am sure there is video somewhere.
905   RWSGFY   2024 Jan 26, 7:11pm  

Stores should go back to clerk-behind-counter model. You pay - you get your toothpaste.
906   AD   2024 Jan 26, 9:39pm  

RWSGFY says

Stores should go back to clerk-behind-counter model. You pay - you get your toothpaste.


forcing us to buy online and pickup or have it delivered ... the store just has to deal with its employees stealing ....

or the stores go the Sams Club or Costco way which makes it harder to steal
....
908   Patrick   2024 Jan 30, 9:31am  

https://www.piratewires.com/p/san-francisco-homeless-ticking-time-bomb


The hardest thing you’ll ever have to comprehend in terms of San Francisco’s government is the city’s leaders aren’t incompetent. This is what they want.

At any given moment, on any given day, there are around 8,000 people sleeping on the streets of the city — one of the wealthiest, per capita, in human history. Once acquainted with the basic facts of the crisis, including the incredible sum of money dedicated to solving the problem, the average San Franciscan concludes the city must be run by morons. How else, with billions of dollars, have city leaders failed to provide a few thousand temporary beds? Even with supportive services, the numbers don’t add up. This is because the average person assumes the small cabal of activists who run the city’s bloated homeless industrial complex want to temporarily shelter and rehabilitate the homeless. They do not. In fact, they are ideologically opposed to the concept. The goal of San Francisco’s activist government is to provide every person who moves to the city with a free, one-bedroom apartment for the rest of their life. City funds are largely allocated to this end. Once placed, this “permanent” solution costs money every year, and every year more people move to the city looking for free housing. The problem compounds.

While the project was never sustainable, the city’s sheep-like wealthy tax base has recently fled for the suburbs. Now, billions of dollars and a decade later, with more people living on the streets than ever, the government faces an impending $724M deficit, with around ten thousand more people reliant on funds, for “free” housing, that could easily cease to exist. This is a ticking time bomb.
909   Patrick   2024 Jan 30, 9:32am  

18th century Scottish lawyer Alexander Fraser Tytler:

A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the people discover they can vote themselves largess out of the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that democracy always collapses over a loose fiscal policy–to be followed by a dictatorship.
910   HeadSet   2024 Jan 30, 1:45pm  

Patrick says

18th century Scottish lawyer Alexander Fraser Tytler:


A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the people discover they can vote themselves largess out of the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that democracy always collapses over a loose fiscal policy–to be followed by a dictatorship.


That is true for universal suffrage. It would be a different story if voting was limited to net tax payers. That is, only people who pay more in than they consume are allowed to vote. That would remove military members, government workers, defense industry contactors, welfare recipients, and SS retirees from the voter rolls.
911   Ceffer   2024 Jan 30, 5:43pm  

Alas the Golden Goose, the Great Pidgin Soros Execution of the cities.
912   Patrick   2024 Jan 30, 6:48pm  

https://sfstandard.com/2024/01/30/san-francisco-life-support/


San Francisco’s Brand Is on Life Support. City Leaders Lack Courage To Act
by Hank Plante
Published Jan. 30, 2024

Brands die. Just ask Lord & Taylor, Blockbuster or the California Republican Party.

Even city brands die.

If it’s not dead already, San Francisco's brand is clearly on life support. It happened because officials allowed 4,400 people to destroy it. That’s the number of unsheltered homeless people in the city’s official 2022 point-in-time count, and they have essentially held the city’s reputation hostage. ...

A series of district attorneys who didn’t believe in prosecuting criminals didn’t help. DA Terence Hallinan had the worst record in the state in the late 1990s, winning convictions in only a third of his cases. His replacement, Kamala Harris, refused to seek the death penalty for a cop killer, drawing widespread condemnation from police and a rebuke from Sen. Dianne Feinstein at the funeral of the officer, Isaac Espinoza. George Gascón famously became the co-author of Proposition 47, which lowered the penalty for smash-and-grab thefts under $950 to misdemeanors. And Chesa Boudin, who was kicked out of office by voters in 2022, never seemed to realize that voters expected him to be a public prosecutor, not the public defender he once was.

Nor did it help when Mayor London Breed announced cuts of $120 million from the police and sheriff’s department budgets in 2020. The cops got the message. Who could blame them for feeling disrespected and less aggressive about fighting crime? ...

The city certainly cleaned up many streets by enforcing anti-camping laws during last year’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference. But permanently doing those things would require city officials to admit their progressive policies have failed.

I’m not convinced the city’s current political leadership has the courage to do that. San Francisco politics are tribal; many leaders are too afraid of looking “conservative” in a liberal town if they take a tougher approach. But the public backlash is real, and it may be the spark the city needs to stop hugging criminals, even if local politicians are the last to realize it.
913   Ceffer   2024 Jan 30, 6:59pm  

Maybe the Globalists will DEW it into oblivion, or HAARP a massive earthquake and divide it into ten fifteen minute cities, with the water front areas for elites only. Wait, the water front areas are already for elites only. Never mind.

No tech oligarchs were harmed in the spinning of this fantasy.
914   RayAmerica   2024 Jan 30, 7:38pm  

I spoke with a lady today that formerly lived in the Bay Area of California where she worked as an RN at an Oakland hospital. Just the other day, she spoke with a fellow RN that still works at the same hospital. Her friend told her that the hospital just put out a very strong warning for all hospital employees, stating that they should not leave the premises for lunch, due entirely to the extremely high crime in the area.

The decay of that entire area is alarming, and almost hard to believe.
915   mell   2024 Jan 30, 7:58pm  

RayAmerica says


I spoke with a lady today that formerly lived in the Bay Area of California where she worked as an RN at an Oakland hospital. Just the other day, she spoke with a fellow RN that still works at the same hospital. Her friend told her that the hospital just put out a very strong warning for all hospital employees, stating that they should not leave the premises for lunch, due entirely to the extremely high crime in the area.

The decay of that entire area is alarming, and almost hard to believe.

Yeah that was supposedly put out by Kaiser. Oakland has always been rough(er) though
916   Patrick   2024 Jan 31, 9:25am  

https://www.coffeeandcovid.com/p/regression-wednesday-january-31-2024




Take for example the Xerox building in Washington, DC. In times of major financial disruption, an asset like the Xerox building can get temporarily “stuck.” At the time of sale this month, the Xerox building was at least 40% unoccupied. It was not even earning enough to pay its bank loan. Worse, they couldn’t get any replacement tenants because the rent was too high, which it needed to be to pay the bank loans.

The building couldn’t attract new tenants with lower rates, because then its existing tenants would demand lower rents too, and it would be a financial death spiral.
917   Eric Holder   2024 Jan 31, 10:47am  

Patrick says

The building couldn’t attract new tenants with lower rates, because then its existing tenants would demand lower rents too


If the lease is not up for renewal they can suck a fat one.
919   Patrick   2024 Feb 1, 8:10pm  

https://patch.com/california/across-ca/target-clerk-unwittingly-tells-newsom-retail-theft-his-fault


Target Clerk Unwittingly Tells Newsom Retail Theft Is His Fault

When Newsom asked a clerk why she didn't intervene upon witnessing a theft, she blamed the governor, not realizing he was in front of her.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom got some unexpected feedback about the state’s shoplifting laws during a trip to Target.

The governor recounted the incident on a Zoom call about mental health that was recorded and shared Wednesday on X by Gabriel Lorenzo Greschler of The Mercury News. Newsom described his conversation with a clerk who saw a person walk out of the store with an item, noting the worker didn’t recognize the governor at first.

“As we’re checking out, the woman says, ‘Oh, he’s just walking out, he didn’t pay for that,’” the governor recalled. “I said, ‘Well why didn’t you stop him?’

“She goes, ‘Oh, the governor’ — swear to God, true story, on my mom’s grave — ‘The governor lowered the threshold, there’s no accountability.’ ...

Newsom then referenced that, at $950, California has the 10th-lowest threshold nationally for prosecutors to charge alleged offenders with a felony, before expressing frustration about his own transaction total.
921   Patrick   2024 Feb 3, 4:17pm  

https://sfstandard.com/2024/02/02/former-san-francisco-mayor-mark-farrell-will-challege-london-breed/


Mark Farrell Will Run To Be San Francisco’s Mayor Again, Sources Say

For a brief window of time, Mark Farrell was mayor of San Francisco. Apparently, that six months running City Hall wasn’t enough.

Multiple sources have confirmed to The Standard that Farrell—a San Francisco native who also served seven years as a supervisor for the Marina District—will challenge Mayor London Breed in November’s election. Farrell is expected to make a formal announcement in the next two weeks.

Farrell, 49, has been recruiting people to appear in his campaign ads, according to sources. Among those contacted was a business owner from the city’s Asian American community, which accounts for one-third of San Francisco residents. Farrell also has been receiving help from Margaux Kelly—a top exec for the nonprofit TogetherSF and one of his former supervisor staffers—to arrange meetings and coordinate his schedule, according to a City Hall source.


Maybe there's a little bit of hope for San Francisco.

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